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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    Phelps Co. Missouri USA
    Posts
    856

    Default Offsetting Hive Boxes

    In the 95 degree plus heat;
    Does anyone offset the hive boxes open 3/8 inch or so ?

    Years ago it was done, just wondering about these days.

    Thanks
    PCM

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    Devils Lake, North Dakota
    Posts
    9,123

    Default

    I just pop the lids a bit. But I am beginning to wonder if
    we'll see any 90's this summer at all up here??

    Offsetting seems like to much work to this hombre.

    Do you have screened bottom boards?? Those with
    top entrances, and propping the lid up in nasty hot
    weather work well for me.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Indian Valley, Virginia
    Posts
    587

    Default

    wouldn't there be a rain problem offsetting the boxes?

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    Devils Lake, North Dakota
    Posts
    9,123

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by randydrivesabus View Post
    wouldn't there be a rain problem offsetting the boxes?
    That would certainly be an issue I think....... Leading to even
    more work running out and "fixing" it for a rain storm.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Apr 2003
    Location
    Greenville, TX, USA
    Posts
    4,397

    Default

    Rain just rolls down the inside wall of the box. If you have SBB or tilt the hives a bit to the front, it goes right on out. It's not over the cluster or brood areas.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Location
    Oxford, Kansas
    Posts
    1,988

    Default

    I dont slide mine back. I do at times rotated them about 10 to 20 degrees from one another to allow for better ventilation between the top hive body and the honey supers rain hasnt been an issue

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Urbana, IA
    Posts
    294

    Default

    When it gets really warm out I prop up my top covers my inner covers have a 1/2 in hole in the front edge as well as the top hole. When it gets really hot I will remove the inner covers an leave the top cover on but still propped up. I have not used screen bottom boards yet but I do plan on trying them.
    I cant say these are the best things to do but it seems to help for me.
    Good Luck! Phil

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Location
    west point, ms
    Posts
    381

    Default

    What is rain?

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Location
    Buda, Texas
    Posts
    922

    Default

    I slide mine back in the way you describe. I never have any problems from it that I have noticed. With most days 100 degrees or over this year, increasing ventilation is important.
    "I am the Good Shepherd. The Good Shepherd lays down His life for the sheep. " John 10:11

  10. #10

    Default

    Bless you, Ted and Ms. I hope you get some soon.
    Try to learn something new every day and give thanks for all your blessings.

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    Phelps Co. Missouri USA
    Posts
    856

    Default

    Thanks for the repies;

    I was just wondering, I see a number of post discussing high heat on these forums, the standard answer appears to be, use SSB & raise the lids a little, I don't believe I have ever seen the suggestion to offset or stagger the boxes !

    Back in the 50's we offset & and used a board, rock or brick to raise the top, wasn't any SSB's or popcycle sticks then.

    Oh, I checked and this is a recommended way in the old book ABC-XYZ.

    Again thanks for your replys
    PCM

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
    Posts
    276

    Default

    I know this flies in the face of every beek that wants to provide ventilation during hot weather, but this is my mentor's method. I'm just throwing it out there as a point of interest. I am reluctant to try it myself but his argument goes like this:

    The bees provide their own ventilation by posting many workers at various points in the hive to move the air around. We've all seen this at the entrance, bees flapping their wings to create a pull or draft in the hive. This expells bad air and creates a de-pressurized zone, so fresh air is forced in to represurize it. Actually bees are also positioned on the inward side of the breeze and flap their wings to help the air come in. When you introduce extra holes (i.e. ventilation by cracking open the lid, re-orienting boxes etc...) you are making life very difficult for these ventilating bees. In nature a hive would live in a hollowed tree cavity or something like that and would never have the benefit of extra ventilation.

    Like I said, I have never tried this but the laws of physics seem to support the theory.

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    Niles, Michigan USA
    Posts
    167

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by MichelinMan View Post
    I know this flies in the face of every beek that wants to provide ventilation during hot weather, but this is my mentor's method. I'm just throwing it out there as a point of interest. I am reluctant to try it myself but his argument goes like this:

    The bees provide their own ventilation by posting many workers at various points in the hive to move the air around. We've all seen this at the entrance, bees flapping their wings to create a pull or draft in the hive. This expells bad air and creates a de-pressurized zone, so fresh air is forced in to represurize it. Actually bees are also positioned on the inward side of the breeze and flap their wings to help the air come in. When you introduce extra holes (i.e. ventilation by cracking open the lid, re-orienting boxes etc...) you are making life very difficult for these ventilating bees. In nature a hive would live in a hollowed tree cavity or something like that and would never have the benefit of extra ventilation.

    Like I said, I have never tried this but the laws of physics seem to support the theory.
    Good point.

    Last year I had a lot of bearding during the summer, and went the ventilation route this year. I have those tubular "happy bottom" boards and a ventilated attic. Not a beard yet, even with a few weeks in the 90s so far this year.

    Meanwhile, I have been intrigued by the Warre hives and how they try to mimic a natural gum. Both from a top ventilation standpoint (none) and true bottom supering (adding supers under the brood nest).

    I'm veering off topic here but I am wondering about the Warre method using Langsroth equipment. Very-bottom supering (my term) and taking boxes off the top in the fall...
    Kevin
    Milton Township, Michigan (near South Bend, Indiana)

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Location
    Tucson, Arizona, USA
    Posts
    5,401

    Default

    It seems more to me like the bees adapt their behaviors (including how they instinctively manipulate air) , depending on all the environmental factors they experience. If the weather is hot and humid, they behave in a particular way. If it is cold and dry, they behave in a different way, etc. Feral colonies choose a multitude of different spaces for their living quarters, even occasionally, open air. In all these different climates and various abodes they choose, they always seem to be able to adjust the environment inside their nests, so as to successfully accomplish all that they need to accomplish.
    ---
    My impression is that the bees will do what they need to keep their nest environment as they want it to be. I only use hive designs and configurations that seem to have the best chance of enhancing the bees abilities to control their internal nest environment. Of course, my efforts may be unintentionally causing more stress than I am intending to relieve, but I must try. My observations seem to indicate that I have been, at least, partially successful.
    48 years - 50 hives - TF
    Joseph Clemens -- Website Under Constructioni

  15. #15
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Location
    The Scenic Flint Hills , KS
    Posts
    5,159
    I agree with Joe.

    We do things to help the bees as much as we can trying to free up the bees that were delegated to cooling and freeing them up to foraging and other duties.

    I slide at least one of the supers back about 3/8ths on every stack. I also use SBB's and will lift one end of the outer cover as well. All my OC's have notches on both ends for ventilation and egresses.
    Bullseye Bill in The Scenic Flint Hills , KS
    www.myspace.com/dukewilliam

  16. #16
    Join Date
    Apr 2003
    Location
    Greenville, TX, USA
    Posts
    4,397

    Default

    Actually, the laws of physics say heat rises. Cracking the top creates a natural draft that the bees don't have to work to maintain. Anybody remember attic fans? How about roof vents? Double hung windows before airconditioning? Open the bottom one a couple of inches, open the top one a couple of inches, nice draft.

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