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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Location
    Chillicothe, Ohio
    Posts
    102

    Default Ant control help

    We are currently using the brown plactic hive top feeders from Brushy Mountain which we like but are having a real ant problem. (These are the large ants, maybe carpenter) We tried putting the legs of the stand in bowls of oil but too many bees were drowning. Then we tried greasing the legs which doesn't seem to help. It's a platform stand with 4x4 legs. Any better suggestions for the legs?
    Thought about doing a central feeder in the apiary but know there will be a lot of uninvited guest.
    What do you do and how do you do it. Details
    Why are we feeding? To build up hives recently started from Nucs to try to get strong enough for winter.
    Thanks in advance for any help here.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    VENTURA, California, USA
    Posts
    3,604

    Smile Ant control help

    Seek and destroy the nest works best.
    Ernie Lucas Apiaries
    Ernie
    My websitehttp://bees4u.com/

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Location
    Sacramento,California,USA
    Posts
    3,876

    Default

    Try puting ground cinnamon in the hive stand leg bowls instead of oil, it might work for ya. I use Oil in the past and was thinking of switching to cinnamon, but I've not had any ant probs so far this year so have not tried it out myself.
    “When one tugs at a single thing in nature, he finds it attached to the rest of the world.” – John Muir

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    CapeCod MA
    Posts
    96

    Default ant help

    I stoped using the top feeder and went to division board feeders with floats. I use two of them taking the place of the 2 outside frames. I also sprinkled cinnamon on the top cover and screened the hole in it. It has worked very well for me.

    jay burgess capecod ma

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    Orlando, FL
    Posts
    1,313

    Default

    I too use the brushy Mtn brown plastic hive top feeders and I too have had some problems with these ants.

    I have had good luck greasing the legs of the stand. The ants can't crawl through a thick layer of grease. Problem is with 4x4 legs you'll need a lot of grease.

    I redesigned my hive stands, so that they now stand on a rebar legs. I cut off the 4x4 legs flush, and then drilled a 5/8 hole in the center of the 4x4 leaving so it was 3" deep and left at least 1.5" of solid wood. I used a Forstener bit so that I could get a nice flat bottom hole. I then cut the rebar into 12" lengths and hammer them into the hole. 3" in the hoel and 9" for a leg.

    They are amazingly strong, require no glue, and are easy to grease up when feeding. I do have to put down a paver stone so that the rebar legs don't sink into the sandy soil we have here, but it works pretty well.

    The other thing I noticed is that the bees seem annoyed by the ants, but I think they are there more for the warmth than the food. I don't think they are harming the bees any.

    As stated previously, these red ants have a main nest nearby and have built a satellite nest in the beehive. If you follow the ants, they are taking the sugar back to the main nest somewhere. Follow them and destroy the main nest. I have followed them sometimes for a long time and a long distance before finding the main nest.

    On my own house they were in the attic over the garage, and I followed them down the side of the house around the back across the lawn and down the fence all the way to a tree stump down near my lake front. It was 300 or more feet and I followed an average of 10 feet per night for a month to find the main nest.
    Troy

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Location
    Starkville,Ms,USA
    Posts
    516

    Default

    Don't worry; They won't drink much.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    Keene, NH, USA
    Posts
    240

    Default

    I used oil and had a lot of drowned bees, too. Now I go to Starbucks and get the used coffee grounds that they bag for garden compost. I've put a barrier of grounds around the perimeter of my stand (6' long for 2 hives) and have not had a problem since.
    7 yrs, 6 hives, TF for 6 years, small cell, moved to OAV this fall.
    www.honeymeadowfarm.com, www.nhbees.wordpress.com

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Sparta, Tennessee
    Posts
    2,139

    Default

    I took the suggestions of a few here on BS and mixed Borax with jelly and I smear the slather on the underside and sides of my pallets that the hives set on...instant ant control. It's worked for me.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    Redlands, California, USA
    Posts
    26

    Default Ant control suggestion

    A farmer/beekeeper in western NY state told me that burdock leaves (fresh) get rid of ants. I have no way of testing this as I live in So. Cal now, and there aren't any here.
    We use cinnamon around the legs. Works well.
    A pest control guy told us to spray liquid dish detergent (mix with H2O) every couple days around hive, moving farther and farther away thus driving the ants away. Find the nest and destroy it with detergent. He also told us that
    the BIGGEST problem with ants is that they can bring poison into your hive, and wipe it out entirely. This happened to us!
    A neighbor placed ant traps around the outside of his house. Our girls suffered a 20K dieoff within 2 days of him putting them around. It's a heart wrenching thing to see, and be helpless to do much.
    KEEP ANTS OUT OF YOUR HIVES!!!!

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    greer south carolina USA
    Posts
    86

    Default ants

    simply put oil cups under the hive and the bees will not drown.

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