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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    Crescent City, FL USA
    Posts
    76

    Post New queen and queen cell?

    I made some splits a few weeks ago and I introduced mated queens in all four splits. Now in one of the hives she is letting them build a queen cell. Just one queen cell, but this is a fresh hive with only 2 1/2 frames drawn so far, and this queen cell was not in hive before queen was introduced. She seams to be laying a good pattern, and she is good and healthy so I dont think they would be replacing her, but I have been wrong in the past. They are not bound up so they should not be wanting to swarm. Oh and this is not a normal queen cell this is actually a supersedure cell.

    Should I crush the cell and see if they build another?

    If they do build another should I pull the new queen from that hive and see if another hive will accept her better? (I have a hive that could use a new queen)

    Thanks,
    Richard
    Florida
    6 Hives

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    Helmetta, New Jersey, USA
    Posts
    99

    Default

    From what I understand, some bees like to have cups available, but never do anything with them. I've seen this in my own hives fairly often. They have a couple ready at all times, but they get torn down and built elsewhere for whatever reason.

    IMHO, if the bees feel their queen isn't up to snuff, they are better judges than we are. Crushing the cups won't stop the bees if they feel the queen needs to be superceded.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    lewisberry, Pa, usa
    Posts
    6,081

    Default

    I have reported this event, or something similar for a couple years here on beesource. I noticed that with certain strains, like requeening or splitting Italians and adding Russians, that the bees seem to accept the queen and even allow her to lay. But the bees are intent with replacing her at the first chance they get. At first I thought that they just merely started a queen cell while the queen was being released, with the thought that as soon as the queen would get around to it, she would kill the queen. But I would go in a couple of weeks later, and my queen was replaced by the one the hive raised. It seems to happen much more often later in the year.

    Although sometimes a hive just simply rejects a queen for whatever reason, I feel that there is a certain "something" at play that makes this scenario more than a simple acceptance point. there was a study that dismissed the whole acceptance comments that some feel is true when changing genetics of the hive, like changing over to Russians. But I am not sure if the study just stopped at the first sign of release and egg laying. I wish they would of monitored to see how many queens would still be around a period of time later.

    Of course this begs to question...were these queens yours? Or were they bought? From the information we are getting lately about chemicals and such, it would not surprise me to have bees just simply reject a chemical laced queen the first chance they had.

    I had wondered if you stick the queen cell with something like a pin, to simulate the queen killing it off, would this have a positive impact or end result. I do not know, but I think I will try it.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    Crescent City, FL USA
    Posts
    76

    Default

    I bought my queens from ROSSMAN. I bought 4 queens and only 2 where accepted. Now it looks like one of the 2 accepted will be gone pretty soon. I think I will pull this queen and re introduce her into a nuc with some capped brood and hope it takes this time. I hate to have only one out of four queens still around after paying for them.

    I am looking at getting set up to raise my own queens but have not got up the money to invest nor the confidence yet to do it on my own yet.

    Thanks,
    Richard

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