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Thread: Queen excluders

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Delta, Utah
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    494

    Default Queen excluders

    Just curious what others are doing. I go back and forth on this. Honey excluder or queen excluder? Last year I had almost no problems with the queen moving up. This year I have over a thousand supers with a substantial amount of brood in them and I'm not going to exctract the brood thank you very much. The brood will eventually hatch but I wanted to extract this earlier, lighter honey a couple of weeks ago not later when darker honey is being brought in.

    Anyway, messing with brood is extremely time consuming. I want white comb in my honey supers not dark comb - less problems with wax moths and hopefully better honey?? What's the consensus among y'all?
    -Rob Bliss
    Bliss Honey and bee supplies

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
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    Tucson, Arizona, USA
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    Default

    Maybe this thread will help: http://beesource.com/forums/showpost...84&postcount=5

    Wow, queen excluders are certainly a popular subject. I am certainly thankful for that or I might never have learned how to use them efficiently.
    Last edited by Joseph Clemens; 07-22-2008 at 07:52 PM.
    48 years - 50 hives - TF
    Joseph Clemens -- Website Under Constructioni

  3. #3

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    I use some excluders. I hate waiting to pull honey too. This year I am trying something different then what I have in the past. I pull the excluders back 1 inch or so. Seems to get the bees through real quick and so far no queens. She usually stays towards the center anyway.
    Columbia City, Indiana

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Davis,South Dakota,USA
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    401

    Default Queen excluders

    It just matters how fast your flow is,and how patient you are.

  5. #5
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    Nov 2004
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    Owen, WI, USA
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    Default

    Up here in the north country it would be tough getting the honey off and extracted in a timely manner if we had to wait for a bunch of brood to hatch, plus we want light supers too. We try to run excluders on everything, but sometimes don't get them on. If not John has the time consuming job of consolidating brood.
    Sheri

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    Venango/Crawford Pennsylvania
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    Default

    I have always use one super of comb honey between the hive body and extracting supers. I never had a problem with the queen going up. However, having said that, if you find the brood chamber filling up you better add another hive body or super for her to lay in.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
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    Delta, Utah
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    Default pulling honey

    When pulling honey, do you pull the excluder out before putting your fume boards on or do you just force the bees right through the excluder?
    -Rob Bliss
    Bliss Honey and bee supplies

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
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    Owen, WI, USA
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by pahvantpiper View Post
    When pulling honey, do you pull the excluder out before putting your fume boards on ....
    We leave them on. We have several colonies with fume boards on so don't have to wait for them to go down. Any remaining bees get blown out.
    Sheri

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    owensboro,ky
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    Default

    removing the excluder first would work better but one or the main advantages of fume boards is less handling of the supers.
    Last edited by mike haney; 07-23-2008 at 06:47 AM. Reason: spell
    "Wine is a constant proof that God loves us and loves to see us happy" Ben Franklin

  10. #10

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    I leave the excluders on when I throw the fume boards on. I have 8 or so fume boards. Time I get the last one put on most of the bees are out of the first one. Then blown out like Sheri does. Hmmm. I seem to alot of stuff like Sheri and John.
    Columbia City, Indiana

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
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    Owen, WI, USA
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    Quote Originally Posted by greenbeekeeping View Post
    Hmmm. I seem to alot of stuff like Sheri and John.
    That is because we are all so smart
    Sheri

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    LaGrange, Ga. USA
    Posts
    2

    Use of plastic excluders

    I've tried using queen excluders but gave up for two reasons: 1. A high wind actually blew a super off the plastic was so slick 2.A state bee inspector told me he felt they were unnecessary here in the deep steamy south. I use one deep super and no more than two honey supers. Yeah, I get a lot of splits but what the hey !

  13. #13

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    I'll agree to that Sheri. haha. Smart yep thats me... Just like my good sentence in the previous post. Its not my fault though. My brain works faster than my hands can move. haha.
    Columbia City, Indiana

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
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    Manitoba Canada
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    >>I leave the excluders on when I throw the fume boards on. I have 8 or so fume boards. Time I get the last one put on most of the bees are out of the first one. Then blown out like Sheri does.

    Right on the money, exactly what I do! That is when set aside dosesnt work anylonger
    Ian Steppler >> Canadian Beekeeper's Blog
    www.stepplerfarms.com

  15. #15
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
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    Michael Bush bushfarms.com/bees.htm "Everything works if you let it." ThePracticalBeekeeper.com 40y 200h 37yTF

  16. #16
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
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    Tucson, Arizona, USA
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    Default

    Since I began using queen excluders in the configuration I presently use, I realize that the comment, "queen excluders = honey excluders" is most accurate in my experience, but my queen excluders help keep surplus honey out of my brood nests, where it doesn't belong, and encourages it to be deposited into the honey supers, where I do want it, in that sense my queen excluders are honey excluders, and I'm glad that they are.
    48 years - 50 hives - TF
    Joseph Clemens -- Website Under Constructioni

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