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  1. #1
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    Campobello, SC, USA
    Posts
    195

    Angry Hornets eating my bees!

    I'm starting to get frustrated, maybe its just me but it seems like I have had encounters with every problem bees have to deal with and this is just my first year. This time, HUGE Hornets are coming down about 4 at a time and catching bees. I watched them for a while and this was continously going on at every hive. I know that it wont hurt to lose a few bees, but if this keeps up, I have no doubt that with the weakened colony, I will have problems with Wax Moth, Small Hive Beetle, and who knows what else. Any Idea of how I can put a stop to this? I dont know were they are coming from. They did fly pretty high up with the bees they were catching.
    BTW- Has anyone used Checkmite? How does it work for Small Hive Beetle?
    Thanks, Daniel

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Location
    Starkville,Ms,USA
    Posts
    516

    Default

    You really need to get yourself a trap on your weakest hives for SHB. I think checkmite is approved only for mites- I have not heard anything about it being used for beetles. I would recommend the West SHB trap- I have found it to be extremely effective. I had one placed in a hive which only had about 6 frames and caught 113 adults in five days.

    Yes, if you have weak hives they will be vulnerable to every pest and disease you can think of. The key is nursing them along until they can become strong by combining hives if you can and reducing the space they must defend if not.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    Campobello, SC, USA
    Posts
    195

    Default

    Thanks, I am ordering the beetle traps, but all the suppliers sell this product (Checkmite) for use as SHB control, I have never heard of anyone that used it. Its kind of expensive but if anyone knows how it works before I order it it would be appriciated. I think one hive could use this product if it works well.

    This is the link to Rossmans (Checkmite) labeled for SHB

    http://www.gabees.com/store/product_...f5b9806f825f85

    Also, is there some deterent for hornets, or will they learn to defend themselves by becoming more aggressive?

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    Brookings, Oregon USA
    Posts
    244

    Hornet Traps

    dhood,

    What kind or hornets are they? Are they yellow and black or are they black with a white face. Last year was a very bad year in my area for yellow jackets and bald-faced hornets. I made some traps and set they around the perimeter of my property. I even bought some and hung them from my fence around the bee yard. I caught thousands. Do a google search for a homemade trap, you'll save money and can make them bigger than the ones you can buy in the store. Here is one http://www.ehow.com/how_1740_make-trap-yellow.html - There are more on line - I started with just a soda bottle and saw it really worked within a week I was using the tubs the cat littler comes in. Because of the traps I put out last year I have only seen one or two hornets this year.


    Corinne
    Last edited by golddust-twins; 07-20-2008 at 03:32 PM.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    Campobello, SC, USA
    Posts
    195

    Default

    golddust-twins, I'm not sure. I looked on the internet to identify them. The closest picture I found was the Asian Gaint Hornet, which it said there not in the US. But, I saw two of them go in an empty bucket, I set a piece of plywood on top to keep them in. In a couple of days(after they die) I will go and get them so I can identify them. I knew about the traps, but I was afraid the honeybees would go in them also. My son left a half full A&W rootbeer beside the hives one day, when I saw it a few days later it was full of dead bees that had drowned. Whatever kind of hornet these are they catch honeybees in midair and flyoff with them. They also, land on the landing board and pick them up like its a buffet.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    Brookings, Oregon USA
    Posts
    244

    Default

    dhood,

    Check out the link I gave you....just don't use the banana. I too was worried about the bees being attracted to the traps. So I left the banana out. It still caught the hornets. We don't have the hornets you describe here on the Southern Oregon Coast. Good Luck...hope you identify them.

    Corinne

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    Brookings, Oregon USA
    Posts
    244

    Angry Hornets From Hell???

    dhood

    If this is what they look like.....http://www.badspiderbites.com/giant-hornet/ Not good. National Geographic calls them the Hornets From Hell.

    Corinne

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Location
    Randolph County, Indiana
    Posts
    694

    Default

    Why not just fill it with Coca Cola? Yellow Jackets love pop, and bees don't.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    Campobello, SC, USA
    Posts
    195

    Default

    Why not just fill it with Coca Cola? Yellow Jackets love pop, and bees don't.

    reply- That is true, it would most likely work for yellowjackets. And although I have plenty of them around. The bees seem to be able to defend themselves pretty good from them. But would this attract a bee eating hornet? I havent seen these things stop chasing the bees to even look at the syrup feeders.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    Brookings, Oregon USA
    Posts
    244

    Default

    dhood, I think these hornets are looking for meat not sugar. You might want to set a trap out with meat or fish like tuna for the lure. If you do hang the meat make sure the bottom of the bucket, bottle, what ever you use for the trap has liquid in it so the hornets will drown.

    Corinne

  11. #11
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    Campobello, SC, USA
    Posts
    195

    Default Identified "European Hornets"

    I caught two of the hornets today, I think I have identified them as European Hornets. They are still eating honeybees. I will be looking for the nest this week.

    I can't get a decent picture from the digital camera I have but,this is the best I could do.

    Here is a picture of them.

    http://i317.photobucket.com/albums/m.../hornet013.jpg

    http://i317.photobucket.com/albums/m.../hornet012.jpg

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    Brookings, Oregon USA
    Posts
    244

    Default

    dhood,

    Those look nasty to me. Good luck in finding the nest. Take a blow tourch and suit up--don't forget your veil & gloves .

    Corinne

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Location
    Arundel, Maine USA
    Posts
    1,207

    Default

    so, I wanted to share this thread from awhile back. This guy was hilarious. I could totally picture him rigging bacon to a plastic soda bottle.

    Seems to work for him... I'd go with his concoction of "soapy water, tuna, sugar water something on the menu for everyone"

    ROFLMAO!!!

    http://www.beesource.com/forums/show...=hornets+wasps
    Let's BEE friends

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    floyd county, georgia
    Posts
    53

    Default me too!!!

    I have the same hornet, they are usually out in the woods deep but will come around if people live out. This year we have nest near our hives but they have not attempted to bother the bees. Their main source of food are flies. I have read that some beekeeps encourage them to stay because they eat wax moths at night. now if you find the hive there are about 300-700 in it with each having a stinger of 1/4 inch long. A bee suit is of no use. I have found our nest sight but are just leaving them alone for now. They will eat some but usually <1%, but to me that is alot. good luck

  15. #15
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    Brookings, Oregon USA
    Posts
    244

    Default Great One

    >http://www.beesource.com/forums/show...=hornets+wasps

    hummingberd, That's great .

    Corinne

  16. #16
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Faulkner Manitoba, Canada
    Posts
    1,696

    Default

    If this is a hornet that you can not readily identify contact your ag office. If this hornet is not suppose to be in your area the ag office, usda etc should know. They tend to monitor these type of things and sometimes take measures to control them so they do not get a foot hold in an area they are not suppose to be in especially if they tend to be invasive or a threat to a commodity.

  17. #17
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    Fayetteville, AR, USA
    Posts
    144

    Default

    Try this
    http://hgic.clemson.edu/factsheets/HGIC2510.htm
    Homemade Traps: A crude yellow jacket trap is made by hanging a raw fish or piece of liver (slightly diced on the exterior) by string about 1 to 2 inches above a container of detergent and water. The detergent will act as a wetting agent and eliminate surface tension which will improve trap efficiency. Foraging yellow jackets are attracted to the raw meat and will often become overloaded with food and fall into the water and drown. This method of yellow jacket control is not as efficient as nest elimination but it may help reduce the population to acceptable levels.

    "Bee Lining" for Fish Bait: Bee lining is a method by which a person may locate a yellow jacket nest by observing foragers as they return to their colony with food. A freshly caught small fish should be diced slightly on the exterior with a knife and hung in a tree about 5 to 6 feet off the ground. Foraging yellow jackets will be attracted to the raw fish and will chew off a tiny particle of the meat. By close observation, a person can follow the flight line of the yellow jacket back to her nest. The foraging yellow jacket will normally make a "bee line" straight to the nest which is often no more than 1,000 yards from the food source. Fishermen have been known to use this procedure to discover yellow jacket nests and use the grub as excellent fish bait.

  18. #18
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    Fayetteville, AR, USA
    Posts
    144

    Default

    Based on your photos, it looks like you have European hornets, Vespa crabro.
    http://entomology.uark.edu/museum/crabro.html
    The European hornet is easily distinguished from our common yellowjackets. It has a large, robust body with a characteristic black and orange striped abdomen. The head, parts of the thorax, and front of the abdomen are patterned in reddish brown coloration. The head is swollen behind the eyes, and ocelli (the small, simple eyes on top of the head) are remote from the rear margin of the head.

    Workers usually hunt active insects, which they masticate and feed to the larvae in the cells of the nest combs. They have been known to raid bee hives, taking the bees and their larvae and pupae as food, but leaving the honey.

    As its common name implies, the European hornet is native to central and western Europe, but it is never found north of the 63rd parallel. In North America, it was first found in New York State in the mid 1800s. During the following century, it spread slowly through southern New England and south through New Jersey and Pennsylvania to Virginia and North Carolina. By 1973, outlying populations were detected in scattered localities in Georgia, Tennessee, Kentucky, Ohio, and Indiana.In the late 1970s and early 1980s it spread rapidly across Kentucky. By the early 1980s, isolated reports revealed that it covered the area from Maine and southeastern Canada south to North Carolina and west to Michigan and Tennessee, with only scattered occurrences in states south of Tennessee and North Carolina, and for Wisconsin, Illinois, Minnesota, and adjacent areas north of Missouri and west of the Mississippi River

  19. #19
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    owensboro,ky
    Posts
    2,240

    Default nest

    Quote Originally Posted by jeannie View Post
    I have the same hornet, they are usually out in the woods deep but will come around if people live out. This year we have nest near our hives but they have not attempted to bother the bees. Their main source of food are flies. I have read that some beekeeps encourage them to stay because they eat wax moths at night. now if you find the hive there are about 300-700 in it with each having a stinger of 1/4 inch long. A bee suit is of no use. I have found our nest sight but are just leaving them alone for now. They will eat some but usually <1%, but to me that is alot. good luck
    jeannie: could you post a pic of the nest or give us a decription of it? thanks,mike
    "Wine is a constant proof that God loves us and loves to see us happy" Ben Franklin

  20. #20
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Location
    Starkville,Ms,USA
    Posts
    516

    Default

    Hmm. I just saw a large hornet in my back yard about a dozen feet from my hives. It looked very similar to the picture I've seen of the European hornet. It had the black and yellow stripes and red legs.

    The only problem with that is I spotted it digging a small crater in the ground. I have been seeing these holes in my lawn where the grass is pulled out of about a 2 inch diameter area and have been wondering what created them. Mystery solved. The hole doesn't lead anywhere and I assume they are gathering mud but I thought hornets made nests made of paper.

    What would they be doing gathering mud? These things are much larger than mud daubers or yellow jackets.

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