Results 1 to 7 of 7

Thread: Basswood

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Location
    Western Illinois
    Posts
    111

    Default Basswood

    I would like to plant about 100-150 basswood trees (for the bees of course!) and was wondering where a good nursery is. Also, I've found a site that will sell me the seeds. Is it too late in the year to plant these? Thanks!

  2. #2
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Hillsboro, Wisconsin, USA
    Posts
    1,672

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Beacon Woods View Post
    I would like to plant about 100-150 basswood trees (for the bees of course!) and was wondering where a good nursery is. Also, I've found a site that will sell me the seeds. Is it too late in the year to plant these? Thanks!
    You might try to get the trees as seedlings next spring through programs offered by conservation districts, the DNR, or similar. You can usually buy larger numbers of trees fairly cheaply. Champaign County in IL has a program, for example. Remember that Basswood grows best on deep, fertile, well-drained loam and clay soils, and it is essentially a flood plain tree. You don't want to plant them in dry sloped areas, but primarily in lower areas with higher amounts of moisture.

    MM


    BTW, the seed is difficult to germinate, and I don't find too many seedlings near the trees on my acreage. They regenerate primarily from sprouts after they are felled.
    Last edited by MapMan; 07-18-2008 at 04:51 PM.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Location
    Inver Grove, MN
    Posts
    1,462

    Default

    Basswood seed is notoriously hard to germinate. Percentages are usually very low.
    Linux - World domination through world cooperation

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Location
    Western Illinois
    Posts
    111

    Default

    I didn't know that it was a flood plain tree. I have the perfect spot! I was going to plant willows there but this will probably be better. Thanks Mapman, I can always count on you for good information!

  5. #5
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Hillsboro, Wisconsin, USA
    Posts
    1,672

    Default

    Don't plant them too close to standing water. Need well-drained location. Oh, stay away from willows - you will regret it if you plant them, as they are messy, and come down in storms, too! I have a horticulture degree, among others...

    MM

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Location
    Kennebunk, Maine
    Posts
    201

    Default

    At what age or height do Basswood trees start blooming? I planted four of them last year. They are still only about 2 feet tall.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Hillsboro, Wisconsin, USA
    Posts
    1,672

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Luke View Post
    At what age or height do Basswood trees start blooming? I planted four of them last year. They are still only about 2 feet tall.

    That's a tough question, as there are many variables which come into play before any tree blooms, such as location, environmental extremes of heat and cold, amount of moisture available, amount of growth per year based on climate, etc. Age and height are not always good indicators either, as age and height are not always related - some conditions on northern slopes are ideal for most tree growth, whereas southern slopes tend to be drier and the trees mature more slowly.

    In ideal conditions, I've seen some basswoods (we're talking the American Basswood here) bloom when they are 20 feet high, and I'd guess (and it is a guess) that most bloom by 30 feet in height. I've seen it referenced that a tree won't bloom and set seed until it is 15 years of age, so how high it is is dependent on environmental factors. It is tough to tell sometimes, because they are a sprouting tree - many (most) trees have at least two trunks originating from a central trunk, and they all bloom in varying years. Aside from their blooms, I think that it makes some of the best construction lumber around - much better than pine/spruce/fir, and it is fantastic for carving. The floor joists in an addition to my home added in the '20's is basswood - solid as can be.

    MM

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
Ads