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Thread: Moving bees

  1. #21
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    Davis,South Dakota,USA
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    Gee that would take alot of buses.

  2. #22
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    Dec 2006
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    Amador County, Calif
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    Big Grin

    Quote Originally Posted by high rate of speed View Post
    Gee that would take alot of buses.
    Ya... And make sure you look underneath the bus for Keith before starting.lol
    Last edited by Keith Jarrett; 07-20-2008 at 02:13 PM.

  3. #23
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    Jan 2008
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    ::.Bees do weird things to a person sometimes.Gotta love it.

  4. #24
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    Jul 2008
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    Damascus, Maryland
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    Two hives per window so they won't be crowded. No skid loader to have, no more anything hard to do just drive the bus/buses to where ever you wish to polinate and unhook your tow behind an go home:}:}

    you might even be able to do four hives, one on top the other also, I didnot mesure for that aspect.


    Quote Originally Posted by high rate of speed View Post
    Gee that would take alot of buses.
    "Life without God is like an unsharpened pencil - it has no point."

  5. #25
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    Jan 2008
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    Davis,South Dakota,USA
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    [QUOTE=J-Bees;336471][B]
    Two hives per window so they won't be crowded. No skid loader to have.
    Sounds like one heck of a doctor bill loading all of those babys.If a person even had 500 colonies it just doesnt seem realalistic.But good luck.

  6. #26
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    Nov 2004
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    Owen, WI, USA
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    How many school buses does it take to pollinate a cucumber field? How many hives go in a school bus, anyway? Let's see, if there were 20 windows (I have no clue how many windows) on each side that is 40 colonies a side so 80 colonies a bus. If you figure 800 colonies minimum to make a living, that would be 10 school buses! I think I would spend my money on a flatbed and a swinger, but hey, that's just me.

    I could see this on a sideline scale, to chase a particular bloom maybe, but there have been a lot of smart people in pollination for a long time and I think if this was feasible on a large enough scale to make a living someone would have done it by now. Somebody would be doing it now. Another problem is you can't spread out colonies in the orchards. Growers want a couple pallets here, a couple pallets there, but maybe with some row crops it is different. What do I know? Get back to us on this one once you work out the details. Maybe I will buy school bus stock, just in case.
    Sheri

  7. #27
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    Sep 2007
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    Phelps Co. Missouri USA
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    School bus would probably work, in Europe they build special truck beds to make moveable apariy's.

    In Washington, Mo. a fellow had converted a school bus to haul cattle, he did get a lot of strange looks going down the highway, seems everyone honked and waved, he used it for a number of years till he retired !!

    PCM

  8. #28
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    Mar 2005
    Location
    Odessa, Missouri
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    629

    Smile

    Gregg,
    I move hives all the time in the country without tying down on flat back roads. We also move pallets out of and into almonds from holding yards (less than 5 miles and not interstate) without tying (but only two pallets high). Did loose a stack once in a rough spot around a dyke in almonds but the stack was three pallets high.

    I put a easy pull nail in the top of the first two rows of lids *if* speeds reach over thirty MPH and windy.

    We have trouble with lids trying to blow off at highway speeds on the first two rows with tying (ropes) so we always put a pallet to hold the lids down to cover the lids of the first two pallets.(or a nail in each lid of the first two rows.) Easier than losing lids.

    If cross straps and follower boards are not placed correctly on semi loads you can end up with a bunch of lids off hives bunched under nets by the time you reach California.

    I always tie newly worked or equipment which has not yet been propolis sealed by the bees. I shrink wrap supers (especially dry supers) when moving around. Got tired of always falling and shifting around.

    I don't shrink wrap honey supers coming in from the field. Only tie or strap down.
    Bob Harrison

  9. #29
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    Jul 2008
    Location
    Damascus, Maryland
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    Quote Originally Posted by JohnK and Sheri View Post
    Sheri
    Well some of us small guys don't quite know what all you big money makers know YET:}:}

    UNDERSTAND A WOMAN
    (A MAN'S PERSPECTIVE)
    I know I'm not going to understand women.
    I'll never understand how you can take boiling hot wax,
    pour it onto your upper thigh, rip the hair out by the root,
    and still be afraid of a spider.





    I won't ever get that big, but did think a lot about. I will try it for a few years just as a hobby and a little extra retirement money.


    JB:}
    "Life without God is like an unsharpened pencil - it has no point."

  10. #30
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    Feb 2008
    Location
    Hanford Ca
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    I got w clips for my pallets. Here in Central Ca we tend to get very hot in the summer. Just a few weeks ago we had a week of over 108s with 2 days in the 112s. Having th w clips help the air circulate around each hive helping the bees keep the hives cool so that you dont loose any frames of comb to melting. I had one weak swarm hive who lost 3 frames of comb in the 112 degree days we had. melted to one another and to the bottom of the pallet. It was pain in the butt to get it out.

    Angi

  11. #31
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    Nov 2004
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    Owen, WI, USA
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    Quote Originally Posted by Angi_H View Post
    lost 3 frames of comb in the 112 degree days. Angi
    Wow that would be a pain. We don't have to worry about that here in Wisconsin but the tops of the frames do sometimes get a little melty on a sunny day because we use migratory covers. By the time it gets that warm here we have supers on, so no harm.
    Sheri

  12. #32
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    Jan 2008
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    Davis,South Dakota,USA
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    The reason we use the w clips is for the damp winters in california.Keeping the boxes spaced slows the rotting process.As far as the heat goes,I have friends that live in Imperial valley where the temps reach 120,they build sheds over the hives to prevent them from melting down.

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