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Thread: Hive die outs

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  1. #1
    Join Date
    May 2008
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    Snowmass, Colorado, USA
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    Default Hive die outs

    Talking to a fellow commercial beek today and he asked if I was having any problems with my hives. He stated that he was having a higher then usual die out of hives from being queenless. The problem seems to be that if the queen dies, instead of building queen cells for new queens the bees are just dying off and not building queen cells. We are wondering if there is some genetic strain that has gotten into the bees that prevents this, maybe some anti-swarming genetic that someone was playing around with. Anyone else experiencing this? The majority of the queens are Kona but it could be anything. Also to note, there is not any unusual AFB or EFB going on and the hives that are not losing queens are exceptionally strong this year....never an easy answer.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
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    Amador County, Calif
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    Quote Originally Posted by alpha6 View Post
    Anyone else experiencing this? The majority of the queens are Kona but it could be anything.
    Ya every year at this time. Also note, nothing wrong with Kona.

    This month, I'm going around with a queen bank checking & requeening hives on the whole outfit. About the last five years or so been doing this and it keeps your winter loss rate down.

    Next month pollen sub.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
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    Davis,South Dakota,USA
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    Heck, requeening is like going to Reno,shoot what am I talking about beekeeping in general is a gamble.[JUST A COUPLE OF GALLONS]

  4. #4
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    May 2008
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    No, nothing wrong with Kona queens, most are strong and they get are good about filling very large orders in the spring so I have nothing bad to say about them. I just put that out there in case anyone else getting the majority of their queens from them were seeing the same thing.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    May 2002
    Location
    San Mateo, CA
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    I have been seeing more queen problems the last two years since the CCD stuff started. Swarms going queenless, hives going queenless.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    College Station, Texas
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    alpha 6 writes:
    We are wondering if there is some genetic strain that has gotten into the bees that prevents this

    tecumseh replies: well I am by self description a serious sideline (not commercial) but this observation was made some years ago (sometime around the mid 1980's) when I worked for a commercial concern.

    at that time I was rearing a goodly number of queen cells and I observed that some hives just didn't ever seem to get around to rearing emergency queen cell. there never really seemed to be any signifcant shortage of pollen or stores in these hives when you would break them apart. it just 'seemed' that they had forgotton how do do this essential task.

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