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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Location
    Auburn, CA, USA
    Posts
    17

    Default Bears and Baiting Electric Fence

    Hi All,

    I'm new and yesterday a bear hit my hive...looks like I might be ok, but now I'm needing some help on my baiting the electric fence. I have done some searching and people indicate to leave some bacon on the wire so that the bear gets hit in the mouth. How long do I need to keep the bacon on the wire? How often does it need replacing if it should stay there? I had my 2 hives inside a 6 foot poly mesh wire to keep out the deer, but the bear tore through it. I do have a steel deer fence around my orchard, which is 10 feet away...should I move my hives over into the orchard? Will that short of a move confuse the bees? Any help would be great.

    Evin

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Location
    North Conway, NH
    Posts
    11

    Default

    Baiting the fence is a good thing but you need to go a Little further...depending on your soil, I would use three ground rods. I would also lay a two foot section of chicken wire around your yard just outside the wire, then attach to your ground system at your fencer. This will give her a big surprise. I have been dealing with a mom and three cubs. Lets just say she has been introduced but will sit within 50 feet looking at the bees....

    John

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    Madison, Wisconsin, USA
    Posts
    39

    Default

    I'd agree with the ground system comment. If it's dry in your neck of the woods, make sure you pour some water around the ground rods to keep the soil moist for better grounding

  4. #4
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    Snowmass, Colorado, USA
    Posts
    2,497

    Default

    We have lots of bears in our area. A good idea if your ground is dry to use two or three 8ft ground rods. Next is make sure your fence has enough juice. Its the joules that matter. Make sure your system puts out 2.5 or better joules. That is enough to give a bear a kick.

    Lastly, sad to say but if the bear got though your fence then it will most likely be back. I usually don't bait my fences, but in your case it may be a good idea to get him to get a zing since he is going to go after it anyway.

    Good luck

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Location
    Milford, PA
    Posts
    58

    Default

    I know many Beekeepers bait their fences, but I would check the laws with the game warden. In PA it is against the law leave bait for bears.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Location
    goshen, ma
    Posts
    359

    Default

    Bacon can work very wel but after a day or so i always had the birds steal it so it might not be a bad idea to try strips of rag dipped in peanut butter in between the bacon. it stays better and the bears really need to mouth it for awhile to get the stuff off giving it more time to get shown the way back home




    -jeff

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Location
    Princeton, West Virginia
    Posts
    478

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by jeff123fish View Post
    Bacon can work very wel but after a day or so i always had the birds steal it so it might not be a bad idea to try strips of rag dipped in peanut butter in between the bacon. it stays better and the bears really need to mouth it for awhile to get the stuff off giving it more time to get shown the way back home


    -jeff
    I agree with the peanutbutter only I would take a piece of hardware cloth about 8 " by 3 " bend it double across the width of it and coat it with peanutbutter and hang it on the electric fence.

    Then go to a nearby tree and mount a game camera. You might get some good pictures to put on the picture forum
    What I Smoke has a Sting to it

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    Red Bluff, Ca
    Posts
    301

    Default Charger

    I got a P30 from this site.


    http://www.patriotchargers.com/index.html

    It will knock your socks off!! Arc will jump 3/8 of a inch if you stand on the chicken wire ground.
    Dan

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    Ludington, Michigan
    Posts
    638

    Default

    use tin foil about 2 inchs wide and smear peanut butter on it and fold it over the wire. The foil protects it from sun and rain

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    South San Ysidro, NM
    Posts
    503

    Default

    I do as Danno suggests. I've seen scat in the area but am not sure if they have taken the bait yet - no scuff marks on the ground that I can see...

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Location
    Auburn, CA, USA
    Posts
    17

    Default

    Thanks for all the suggestions... I'm keeping an eye on the fence and I have put chicken wire on the ground as well. I have a Zareba Yellow Jacket that is rated at 0.28 J and my fence is about 60 ft long with 4 wires = 240 feet total will this do the trick? it gave me one good shock

    Evin
    Last edited by Evin; 07-17-2008 at 10:59 AM.

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Sparta, Tennessee
    Posts
    2,136

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by metrosean View Post
    I know many Beekeepers bait their fences, but I would check the laws with the game warden. In PA it is against the law leave bait for bears.
    I'd rather save bacon fat for the birds in PA! My method for delivery would be to wire bacon impregnated t-shirt strips on my electric fence for those birds! This way they have a perch to stand on while they feed and fatten up prior to the harsh winter!

  13. #13
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    Concord, CA
    Posts
    4,141

    Default

    Then if you're caught. You can say you weren't baiting the bears, you where feeding the birds.

    I'd do it in a heartbeat.

    Dan

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    Nevada County, CA
    Posts
    1,083

    Default

    I use cans of sardines wired to the hot wire and cracked open about 1/4 inch. I like to put some on the fence when the yard is empty and leave the power off until I find the empty cans ripped of the fence. Then I turn the power on for a week or so before I move the bees in. Since we have multiple bears in our area this gives them all a chance to taste the shock before they are tempted to go through it. I also use either stock panels hung on insulators or grounded field fencing with the hot wire held away from it by insulators so they can't get part way through the fence before they feel it. If their head is already past the wires and the get shocked they will sometimes just lunge forward. It's a real problem to find a bear in your beeyard that is afraid to go back out becaus of the electric fence. This is especially true is the charger is mounted on the fence and you have to get that close to turn it off.
    doug

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