Results 1 to 8 of 8

Thread: Cranberry honey

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    Dane County, WI.
    Posts
    3,721

    Default Cranberry honey

    Do the bees collect a reasonable amount of nectar from cranberry blossoms? Wisconsin is one of the top states for cranberries and some growers rent hives for the sole purpose of pollination; Michigan, Minnesota and Maine may be some of the others. The reason I am asking is that I recently bought one [$2.59/lb.], 'cranberry honey' just to try it; it really didn't taste different from regular 'store honey'.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    Kiel WI, USA
    Posts
    2,368

    Default

    I've always heard they practically starve on cranberry bogs. hrug:

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    Lake county, Indiana 46408-4109
    Posts
    3,543

    Default

    I am with U Oldbee I bought some on the east coast and cant tell much differance but my taster dont work to good
    Ed, KA9CTT profanity is IGNORANCE made audible
    you can`t fix stupid not even with duct tape

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    Owen, WI, USA
    Posts
    2,560

    Default

    I think it depends on the bog and the year. If they are placed where they have no choice but to work the cranberries, AND the cranberries are yielding they might make a little cranberry honey. I have had it, could taste the difference, and liked it. That said, I sure wouldn't put bees in cranberries expecting a honey crop. They usually don't do well at all on cranberries, and there is honey to be made elsewhere that time of year. Especially when the price of the honey you might miss is high, you better be paid well to take them into cranberries.
    Sheri

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    Worcester County, Massachusetts
    Posts
    3,742

    Default

    i don't think i'd eat cranberry honey unless i was very sure of the source, and the treatments used on the berries.

    dave mendes recently gave congressional testimony, including"
    The samples taken while my bees were in Massachusetts cranberries show levels of fungicide in the pollen as high as 7000 ppb.
    http://www.google.com/url?sa=t&ct=re...mPqk9Ak6-04KIA

    deknow

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    Owen, WI, USA
    Posts
    2,560

    Default

    I agree deknow.
    In addition to the pollen maybe being contaminated I have heard the water the bees have access to may also have some problems. I know there are organic bogs and that is where I would be wanting to place my bees, if we ever went into cranberries and that is where I would want to buy any cranberry honey.
    Sheri

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    Worcester County, Massachusetts
    Posts
    3,742

    Default

    yes...we had a discussion about this on the organic list. i looked up the label for the fungicide that the neighbor of a listmember was spraying with....spray on the open bloom (which is also in a bog...so spray the water too), and no mention of avoiding foraging bees....just don't spray within 30 days of harvest

    deknow

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    Dane County, WI.
    Posts
    3,721

    Default

    Thanks for the information. The honey I bought was off to the side in a gourmet section I guess, along with some other varietal honey. It was from a major grocery store. If you 'google' cranberry honey you can see some of it has a reddish tinge, lol.; the one I have is more amber.

    honeyman46408: My 'taster' probably doesn't work so good either, lol.

    Gee! I didn't know cranberries needed to be sprayed very much. What does that say about eating the fruit itself? And they say it's soo good for you. Oh well. Actually MA., NJ., OR., and WA. are the other states.

    http://findarticles.com/p/articles/m...1/ai_n16066298 The honey is not from this beekeeper.

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
Ads