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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    hamburg, new york, usa
    Posts
    440

    Default Do you use water based or oil paint?

    What do you use to paint your supers?

    1) Water based or oil based paint?
    2) Does anyone use oil based stain? Thanks

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Location
    Loganville, GA
    Posts
    2,172

    Default

    The only people that benefit from water based paints are the painters and manufacturers. The best latex paint will not stick, seal or wear as well as oil based paints. And painting over latex with oil paint is a waste of good paint because it will only last as long as whats under it.
    "Success is not final, failure is not fatal: it is the courage to continue that counts." Winston Churchill

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Pepperell, MA.
    Posts
    3,764

    Default

    I just switched back to oil based paints. Even on the house. And, the oil based paints made today aren't as good as they used to be. Last spring, I only had oil based paint so I did up one hive body. Right now, all the rest look just OK while the oil based one looks nearly perfect. Latex has its place but oil is better.
    "My wife always wanted girls. Just not thousands and thousands of them......"

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Location
    Town of Lyndon in Western New York
    Posts
    203

    Default

    Oil base - In fact, although it is extra time & expense, the best quality primer you can get is a must.

    Dale
    My mind works like lightning. One brilliant flash and it\'s gone.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    hamburg, new york, usa
    Posts
    440

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Hayseed View Post
    Oil base - In fact, although it is extra time & expense, the best quality primer you can get is a must.

    Dale
    Dale I didn't understand you. Did you mean to say to apply primer first and than oil paint.

    Thanks to all.

    BTW did anyone ever used oil stains?

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    Fairfield, Connecticut
    Posts
    597

    Default

    I have a Rossman nuc that I finished with half polyurethane and half lacquer(spar) mixed. I did 5 coats, you should see this baby shine. I like the natural cypress clear coated. My other full hives are latex primer and latex solid stain (evergreen finish)
    Last edited by GRIMBEE; 07-09-2008 at 11:14 PM.
    If it isn't broken, don't try to fix it. If you build it, they will fill it.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Location
    White County, Arkansas
    Posts
    874

    Default

    I use what ever mismatched paint they have available. Two coats of that over two coats of Kilz primer and still looking good after three years. The only item I had a problem with I never primed first, a telescoping cover. Looks ratty and wore out. Still solid and in good sturdy shape though.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Location
    Town of Lyndon in Western New York
    Posts
    203

    Default

    [QUOTE=pcelar;333858]Dale I didn't understand you. Did you mean to say to apply primer first and than oil paint.

    The ones holding up best have one coat of either Kilz or Zinsser shelac based primer. (2 coats if there are a lot of cracks/knots. Follow up with any good oil-based paint. By the looks of them (3 & 4 years later) the extra effort is worth it.

    I used a nice stained poly for a few. Held up fairly well. Stopped using as ext paint worked as well and less expensive. One warning - a dark paint/stain will absorb suns energy and can cause comb collapse if not enough ventilation. [sort of like a solar melter]

    Dale
    My mind works like lightning. One brilliant flash and it\'s gone.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    Orlando, FL
    Posts
    1,313

    Default

    You know it is interesting that you mention using the shellac based primer as I too thought that it would be the best thing to use.

    I read the label and it clearly says not to use in an outdoor or very humid environment. Well here in Florida - all we have in the outdoors is an extremely humid environment.

    I wonder why it says that?

    I decided to use the Kilz latex primer and then a white latex paint. I've got to say I don't think the results are very good.

    I am concerned about the cure time of an oil based paint though. How long before you can't smell it anymore?
    Troy

  10. #10

    Default

    But onn the other hand Zinner 123 primer is a VERY good pruduct. Made by the same people.
    My-smokepole
    http://www.davidspaintingandwallpapering.com"

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    mt. airy, surry county, nc
    Posts
    217

    Default

    this may be a little off thread. when and how often do you paint your hives? do you paint the hives with the bees in it or do you change boxes? do you think the paint has ever harmed the bees?
    "Any fool can learn, the trick is to understand - Einstein"

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Barry, TX USA
    Posts
    861

    Default

    I used to paint all of my hives and supers with oil over a coat of primer. I've descended into latex paint with no primer. To be honest I wouldn't even paint unless I wanted the lighter color on the outside of the hive because of how hot we get in the summer. This year painting duty has fallen to my 15 year old daughter who is very artistic. We still paint bottom boards, covers and supers white. The hive bodies have taken on all different pastel colors because that's what my daughter wanted. It makes for a pretty and very feminine apiary but I'm glad to involve my daughter and have her influence. Somehow, I think my manhood is intact.

    We don't paint hives with bees in them. I normally switch out hive bodies after I've had a dead out or sometimes because the wood finally gives up the ghost under all of that weight. We paint when we assemble and that's it. I think it's good to change out woodenware over the years.

    Some of my original supers, primed and painted with oil, still don't look that bad and they're over 10 years old!

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    hamburg, new york, usa
    Posts
    440

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by beyondthesidewalks View Post
    Some of my original supers, primed and painted with oil, still don't look that bad and they're over 10 years old!
    I bet those were painted with oil paint base.

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Location
    Grifton, NC
    Posts
    1,302

    Default

    I've used only white semi-gloss or satin exterior latex and have never had a problem with paint not sticking. It dries quickly and cleans up easily. I have some boxes that are 8 years old and have no rot. Oil and water do not mix, so if you put oil paint on a raw wooden box that absorbs atmospheric moisture, it won't stick as well as latex.
    Banjos and bees... how sweet it is!

  15. #15
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Johnson City, TN
    Posts
    217

    Default

    I use Severe Weather exterior latex paint. Some of my hive bodies are over 15 years old and still in good shape. That's long enough for me.
    Bee just and just bee

  16. #16
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Murfreesboro, TN, USA
    Posts
    575

    Default

    I use a good quality white exterior latex paint. Works for me and makes clean up easy!
    "My child, eat honey, for it is good." (Proverbs 24:13)

  17. #17
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    SLC, Utah, USA
    Posts
    15

    Default Finish Compatability

    I was union trained as a painter and have been in the business for 26 years.

    Everything I have ever been made aware of regarding the compatability of polyurethane and lacquer it that they are not compatable.

    If you have information that states otherwise, I would be interested in knowing where it comes from, since it would contradict my materials handbook.

  18. #18
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Location
    Oak Harbor, WA
    Posts
    2

    Default

    Since he called it (spar) lacquer, I assumed he really meant (spar) varnish. The spar varnish was probably polyurethane, as well, with some long oils and UV absorbers added (since plain poly deteriorates under UV).

    -jon-

  19. #19
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    Luzerne County, Plains, PA, USA
    Posts
    162

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by papa bear View Post
    this may be a little off thread. when and how often do you paint your hives? do you paint the hives with the bees in it or do you change boxes? do you think the paint has ever harmed the bees?
    I cant imagine painting with bees in the hive is a good idea, unless your goal is the have your hive(s) decorated with dead bees stuck all over the outsides.

    Guess i could be wrong, maybe the bees hate the smell, and wouldnt consider landing on it, but i would never paint with bees at home....... I'll be switching boxes when that time comes.
    A beekeeper is not what I am, it's what I aspire to become.

  20. #20
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    SLC, Utah, USA
    Posts
    15

    Default

    Fres~Coat Troubleshooter® Alkyd/Linseed Oil Wood Primer from California Paints would be my recommendation based on how well it preforms over time on home exteriors.

    I'm not sure how bees would feel about it though.

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