Hi Guys,

I have just read this book by Author Grace Pundyk.

It presents much like a travel log, as Grace has travelled the world researching, as she calls it, 'the politics of honey.' What makes it so special, is that Grace is seeing the industry with fresh eyes, not having had much if any exposure to beekeeping prior to this assignment.

Interesting tit-bits emerge, like this one: Honey was one of the first foodstuffs to emerge out of the contaminated zones after the Chernobyl Nuclear Accident. WOW! That tells us heaps about the very unique nature of flowers and bees. Better keep that little gem in your first aid kit!

Grace manages to weave a bit of her own philosophy and vision into the tales, and pretty much calls it as she sees it, sometimes at a cost in political correctness! Grace also addresses the issue of Osama Bin Laden's involvement with the honey trade. Regardless of all this, she emerges a committed fan of honey.

Honey is such a fundamental commodity, so pertinent to all cultures, races and regions, the subject is difficult to reign in and encapsulate into the one narrative. However, the international trade in honey is such, that it has in effect become a monetary commodity. It appears to me that those who really understand the world wide impact honey has, are keeping it a bit quiet, choosing rather to quote local conditions, selected cases and isolated situations, when in fact they are all woven together into a world market. Grace lifts the lid on so many stories as yet untold, the reader commences to get a whole new perspective on just how much honey there is in the world and just how little, at times too.

The book was published in Australia, and as yet seems not to be available elsewhere, however it is available by post, from Australia, at this book store:
http://www.dymocks.com.au/

I believe all of us could do our little bugzies a favour by promoting this book, and of course especially by buying it and reading it! It is a compelling read once you start, so take the weekend off in advance!

Cheers,

John