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Thread: Disaster!

  1. #21
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    Lurton, Arkansas
    Posts
    13

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    Are you guys saying not to use excluders for a honey crop? Then why are they selling them?
    And should I collect the honey every 2 weeks?
    I am a newbee at all this so you will have to excuse all the questions.
    I am just a thick headed flatfooted hillbilly from Arkansas

  2. #22
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    lewisberry, Pa, usa
    Posts
    6,080

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    Quote Originally Posted by simpleman View Post
    Are you guys saying not to use excluders for a honey crop? Then why are they selling them?
    And should I collect the honey every 2 weeks?
    I am a newbee at all this so you will have to excuse all the questions.
    I am just a thick headed flatfooted hillbilly from Arkansas

    queen excluders are all about proper use of the right equipment. What type excluder you use dictates what you could do to increase effectiveness. Upper entrances, not placing ONLY foundation above a newly installed excluder, placing it sideways, stepping up entrances, etc.

    I have bees using an entrances above an excluder within seconds. The workers are also not inhibited from the supers and are not forced to go through any excluder, although one is installed....because I use them (plastic) sideways.

    And I think anyone qualifying as using them "once" should try a second or even third approach, and perhaps find better use of excluder.

    In the days when I thought I would leave the honey on till I could get a fall flow, (which I do not do any longer), then excluders was no big deal. By late summer, all the brood is forced down below.

    But now I take my honey off after the main flow, (June/July) and I do not want brood in the supers. By doing so, I can make the summer splits I need, let the bees build up the rest of the summer and use the fall flow to get heavy with stores. Its nice to go out, take supers off, and be ready for the next phase of my operation.

    As a side note....supers that have NEVER had brood raised in them are almost always free from wax moth damage. Keep clean supers, and you will have little damage.

    For me, excluders are now something that fit my IPM management and business model very nicely.

  3. #23
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    Snowmass, Colorado, USA
    Posts
    2,496

    Default

    simpleman,

    I use excluder's not for keeping the queen out of the honey supers, but for splits. When I want to split a hive, I will shake the bees into the lower hive or medium, place the excluder on and leave it till the next day. The nurse bees will move up to care for the brood and you know you won't be getting the queen when you pull those to do your split.


    I have had no trouble with the queen staying away from the honey supers without using an excluder if you make sure they have enough frames in the brood area. I run 10 frames in brood and nine in honey supers...seems to work.

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