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  1. #1
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    Dripping Springs, Texas USA
    Posts
    8

    Thumbs down Help-No summer Brood - Is this normal?

    I am a newbie with a couple of hives trying to figure out if the lack of any real capped brood this time of year is normal. Down here in Texas it has been consistently around 100 degrees. I found my queens and the bees are not starting new queen cells. How many brood frames, if any, should I expect in the heat of the summer? When will the queens start laying again? Should I start feeding to spur new laying?

    This is a cool learning experience, but I sure am in the dark. Your help is appreciated. rds.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    Grapevine,Texas
    Posts
    59

    Default hot texas

    You may not have enough ventilation. Had that problem with a nuc-- moved them to reg box with screened bottom board ans fed them. Started laying immediately. I'm in DFW area.

    Ray
    Back To The Future

  3. #3
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    Dripping Springs, Texas USA
    Posts
    8

    Default Thanks - I'll move some air

    I have Top Bar Hives. I guess I will remove the divider board, open up the whole hive and allow some cross-ventilation. I will skip over to the TBH forum and see
    what the good people there suggest. rds.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    Comer, GA, USA
    Posts
    18

    Default no food-no brood

    If you're nectar and pollen sources are currently dried up, the queen will likely stop laying until supplies resume.
    "it's not having what you want . . . it's wanting what you've got"

  5. #5
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    Dripping Springs, Texas USA
    Posts
    8

    Default No Brood is Normal in a drought?

    We are in a pretty good drought right now. Is it normal to go for long periods with no brood at all? They have plenty of honey and pollen stored, should I be feeding more during this time of no nectar to encourage laying? rds.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    piperton,Tennessee,usa
    Posts
    369

    Default

    How long since you stopped feeding them? Is there room to lay or are they honey bound?

    If honey bound give her more room to lay. ie empty comb.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    Dripping Springs, Texas USA
    Posts
    8

    Default Won't they re-use old comb?

    I gave them some more frames, they were pretty honey-bound. But won't they clean up and use the empty comb that has already been used for brood? rds.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Apr 2003
    Location
    Greenville, TX, USA
    Posts
    4,376

    Default

    Yes, they will lay in old comb pretty much indefinitely.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    Dane County, WI.
    Posts
    3,721

    Smile

    "Down here in Texas it has been consistently around 100 degrees".

    From: "The Beekeepers Handbook: 100^ F. ambient air: all brood rearing stops [STOPS], the colony needs water to cool hive".

    From: 'Hive and the Honey Bee'. "Temperature control is one of the areas where the beekeeper can assist his bees with minimal effort on his [now,hers/his] part.
    "At temperatures over 92 ^ F., the bee brood will begin to overheat and die".

    "The beekeeper's contribution to temperature control are basically in apiary SELECTION, PAINTING the hives, providing an adequate WATER source and providing SHADE WHEN APPROPRIATE".

    I don't live in the great state of Texas and have never kept bees there; have a TBH, or,..experienced,....days and days,..or weeks on end with temperatures in the 90's! I don't know what it's like to,..........."keep bees",.....in,..TEXAS.
    Last edited by Oldbee; 06-30-2008 at 05:59 AM.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Apr 2003
    Location
    Greenville, TX, USA
    Posts
    4,376

    Default

    Mine are still brood rearing in a 100 degree heat, but they are on a mesquite flow and about 100 feet from a pond. I would say it is most likely lack of nectar. Feed if you want more bees.

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    burnet texas
    Posts
    80

    Default

    I live in the Hill Country in Central Texas. I too am new to Beekeeping. My bees have all but stopped making brood also. I have a 1 acre pond about 125' from my hives but its just been so dang hot. I find them by the hundreds near the bank, seems like they just like to suck water from the mud instead of getting to close to the water. Never enjoyed working with something like this ever before . I sure hope they do ok.
    A big dog weighs a hundred.

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    46,113

    Default

    If they swarmed there will likely be no brood somewhere in the sequence of events. If the queen was killed, or superseded, they may be no brood. If there's a dearth there may be no brood. If they are actually queenless, of course, there will be no brood.
    Michael Bush bushfarms.com/bees.htm "Everything works if you let it." ThePracticalBeekeeper.com 40y 200h 37yTF

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