Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 123 LastLast
Results 21 to 40 of 47

Thread: Heat stroke

  1. #21
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Tulsa, OK
    Posts
    3,451

    Default

    When you get your minerals out of whack, try drinking Pedialite (or a generic version). It is for young kids who are at risk of being dehydrated from being sick. Not the best tasting stuff, but it gets your electrolytes back in balance.

  2. #22
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    New Albany, Ohio
    Posts
    350

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by deknow View Post
    ...although advice from a physican can't hurt
    Well, THAT's an interesting statement. :confused:

  3. #23
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    46,113

    Default

    >...although advice from a physican can't hurt

    My experience varies...
    Michael Bush bushfarms.com/bees.htm "Everything works if you let it." ThePracticalBeekeeper.com 40y 200h 37yTF

  4. #24
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    Worcester County, Massachusetts
    Posts
    3,623

    Default

    one does not have to put all advice into action...and although doctors are far from always right (or even close), many people's lives are improved and saved by consulting with physicians every day. it's up to the individual to decide what advice from what doctors are worth following.

    deknow

  5. #25
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Location
    Asheville, NC
    Posts
    7

    Default

    For long periods in the beeyard you could wear a camelback under your beesuit.

    Also a spray bottle filled with water is great way to cool your face, head and neck on really hot days.

    And it really helps to put a little something in your water, even if it is just a squeeze of lemon. There is also a gatorade type product called recharge, that is all natural, basically fruit juice and sea salt.

  6. #26
    Join Date
    Jan 2001
    Location
    New York City
    Posts
    3,401

    Default

    I learned about heat stoke years ago when supervising and
    managing a team shaking bees in Georgia.

    The amusing thing here is that some of the symptoms of
    impending heat stroke overlap the symptoms of Anaphylaxis,
    so one has to play a little game show with one self, and
    all the questions are very high-value questions.
    But yeah, water is good and minimal protective gear is
    another. A few stings are less problem than heat stoke,
    which is why I've never owned a bee suit.

    Salt tablets can be deadly in this environment as pointed
    out by at least one other poster. Doctors can be a big
    help, as they went to medical school and we didn't.

    Note that those being dismissive of medicine are also
    generally dismissive of science in general, so it is no
    surprise that they would ignore educated medical advice.

  7. #27
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    New Albany, Ohio
    Posts
    350

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by deknow View Post
    one does not have to put all advice into action...and although doctors are far from always right (or even close), many people's lives are improved and saved by consulting with physicians every day. it's up to the individual to decide what advice from what doctors are worth following.deknow

    Well said...

  8. #28
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Location
    The Scenic Flint Hills , KS
    Posts
    5,159

    Default

    I never drink enough water, never have, still don't. For some odd reason I also don't like ice in my drinks preferring fridge temps or warmer. Really cold drinks make my throat constrict and I get the feeling of suffocation.

    That said, when I was in my late forties I was working in the garden during a typical 100+ summer day, heat never bothered me before but on that day I suffered a heat stroke. Now I can't endure the heat like I used to, I have to be more careful and force myself to drink liquids. It's also the reason I bought a Camelback to freeze and wear before I go out on a really hot day, and the number one reason to have a Golden Bee suit.

    Heat stroke is a life changing event.
    Bullseye Bill in The Scenic Flint Hills , KS
    www.myspace.com/dukewilliam

  9. #29
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    Fayetteville, AR, USA
    Posts
    144

    Default

    X2 on using a camelback, I found out the advantages of using one while doing a century bicycle ride in nebraska years ago.

  10. #30
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Location
    Nicosia, Cyprus
    Posts
    96

    Wink Heatstroke

    I cannot believe that all you beekeepers have not suggested some honey in the water you drink - we have had all the advertisements for every company under the sun!!!
    You should be all ashamed of yourselves for leaving your own product out of making water taste nice.
    Be sweet!
    Oly.

  11. #31
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Location
    Signal Mountain, Tennessee
    Posts
    30

    Default

    The Camelback is a great idea. I had not thought of that. I work in wildland firefighting and our safety and medical officers recommend using a 4:1 ratio mix of water to gatorade type stuff. Drinking water is great but you also have to add in the electrolytes.
    Moderation in all things...

  12. #32
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    Statesboro, Georgia, USA
    Posts
    27

    Default

    I pour water over my bee suit. Just wet your back, chest and arms. The water evaporating keeps me cooler.

    Have a nice day
    Charles

  13. #33
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Location
    avery county n.c.
    Posts
    240

    Default

    Your symptoms sound a lot like mine that turned out to be Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever.
    Thanks for your time, Beehopper

  14. #34
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    owensboro,ky
    Posts
    2,240

    Default

    OUCH! hope you have recovered-bad stuff! good luck,mike
    "Wine is a constant proof that God loves us and loves to see us happy" Ben Franklin

  15. #35
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Location
    Terre Haute, Indiana
    Posts
    240

    Default

    When I was in the service we had to mark the uniforms of anyone who had ever had a heat injury like that. The next time it will happen quicker and with less effort. For some reason the body never quite gets over heat damage.
    Carry lots to drink and a gallon or so to dump on yourself if you stop sweating again. The key is to get that temperature down again before shock sets in.

  16. #36
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    lewisberry, Pa, usa
    Posts
    6,080

    Default

    I did not know that heat stroke had long lasting impact. I know it impacted me, becuase it scared the crap out of me. (Not to worry...I've been told I have lots! ) I will definately think about always having extra water or juice on hand. The stories have been interesting. Thank you.

  17. #37
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    Edgefield County, South Carolina
    Posts
    651

    Default

    After a first time issue with true heat stress, as you have had, It is usually easier for the monkey to get on your back next time around !

    Take care!!!
    sc-bee

  18. #38
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Amador County, Calif
    Posts
    3,173

    Big Grin

    Quote Originally Posted by BjornBee View Post
    , becuase it scared the crap out of me. (Not to worry...I've been told I have lots! ) .
    Yes BB, tell us something we don't know.

    Sorry I couldn't resist.

  19. #39
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Location
    Baltimore, Maryland, USA
    Posts
    49

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by zzub View Post
    For long periods in the beeyard you could wear a camelback under your beesuit.

    Also a spray bottle filled with water is great way to cool your face, head and neck on really hot days.

    And it really helps to put a little something in your water, even if it is just a squeeze of lemon. There is also a gatorade type product called recharge, that is all natural, basically fruit juice and sea salt.
    Gotta jump on this bandwagon. Fill with ice, water and a lemon cut into quarters. And remember to make a conscious effort to drink at at least a certain rate. Counting on your thirst to tell you when to drink will get you in deep trouble.

    I only work one hive, but I have to work in the elements for my job, often with protective equipment. For the exposure windows you guys are talking about that involve several hours in 100+ degree weather, under full body suits, one camelback probably isn't gonna do it, so have a refill ready. Don't poison yourself by drinking too much water, though (it happens). A good guidepost mentioned earlier is that urine should be frequent, and "Clear and Copious".

    Finally, remember to rest in the shade often. Drinking fluids is only one method of regulating your core temperture. With the gear you are wearing, it might not be enough.

    It comes right back to respecting nature and what it can do to us.

  20. #40
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Location
    Navarro county, Texas, USA
    Posts
    109

    Default Re: Heat stroke

    One thing that helps big time is bring you some 1/2 pickle juice and 1/2 tomato juice mixed up in a old water bottle, after 2 or 3 waters drink that, is will replace the salts and give you energy. Of coarse you have to like pickle/tomato juice. It might sound weird but it works good.

    My biggest problem is when im doing a bee removal and cannot drink through my ultra breeze bee suit. Im covered with honey and have about 500 bees at all times trying to get in. Im thinking about a small camelback pack to go on under my bee suit so i can drink some cool water without getting ate up myself
    "If everyone is thinking alike, someone isn't thinking."
    - General George Patton

Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 123 LastLast

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
Ads