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  1. #21
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    Cleveland, Texas
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ross View Post
    I have 2" and 3" holes in virtually all of my tops. I just lay a loose board over them when not in use. Rain leaking in has never been an issue. I'm not saying it doesn't leak in, but I haven't lost a hive (out of 50 now) in several years. Mine are on SBB, so the water doesn't stay around. I would look for other causes.
    I follow almost exactly the same protocol with exactly the same results. I thought I came up with it on my own, but I guess some sensible options can hit independently on the imaginations of multiple persons.
    "The UNKNOWN, huh? That would be SNORBERT ZANGOX over in Waycross."

  2. #22
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    Knoxville, TN
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    1,933

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    No need to look for other causes, just look in the upper right
    hand corner of your post. TX and TN are very different. We often
    get late winter rain followed by sub-freezing
    temps. Wet bees + freeze = dead bees.
    Pour enough rain on the top you described and it will leak.

  3. #23
    Join Date
    Apr 2003
    Location
    Greenville, TX, USA
    Posts
    4,422

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    So do we. Don't mistake hot summers for mild winters in north Texas. November up through April ice storms are very common here. Single digits aren't unheard of, but aren't common. Teens and twenties are common. 16 days without getting above freezing in 1980.

    My tops are plywood without a rim. If you add strips around your tops, that makes a dam that then feeds into the hole.

  4. #24
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    Cleveland, Texas
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    1,378

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    Quote Originally Posted by Ross View Post
    .... 16 days without getting above freezing in 1980.
    I remember that cold snap. I was living in West Central Texas at the time we went 21 days without getting above freezing. My wife and I had just gotten married, we bought an all electric house and our electric bill for that one month was over $600.00 (that's 1980 dollars)! What a miserable 3 weeks.
    "The UNKNOWN, huh? That would be SNORBERT ZANGOX over in Waycross."

  5. #25
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Hays, Kansas, USA
    Posts
    1,080

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    Quote Originally Posted by Gene Weitzel View Post
    I remember that cold snap. I was living in West Central Texas at the time we went 21 days without getting above freezing. My wife and I had just gotten married, we bought an all electric house and our electric bill for that one month was over $600.00 (that's 1980 dollars)! What a miserable 3 weeks.
    I, too was a newly wed around that era. We had other ways to keep warm. A woodstove was but one of them.

  6. #26
    Join Date
    Apr 2003
    Location
    Greenville, TX, USA
    Posts
    4,422

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    Turn down the AC and revive the memories

  7. #27
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    College Station, Texas
    Posts
    6,973

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    gene weitzel writes:
    I follow almost exactly the same protocol with exactly the same results. I thought I came up with it on my own

    tecumseh replies: I utilize what sounds like the same thing... being quite non inventive I stole the idea from a commercial beekeeper who use to employ me in florida back when heck was a pup (perhaps ??? four decades ago).

    if the feeder lid get properly glued in place, then very little water problems occur. most time when problems arise (for me) it is when a bottle gets blown off the top. I would also suggest that the net effect on a hive with a leaking top cover of snow is not the same as ice.

  8. #28
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    Blanco, Texas
    Posts
    74

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    Quote Originally Posted by Gene Weitzel View Post
    I follow almost exactly the same protocol with exactly the same results. I thought I came up with it on my own, but I guess some sensible options can hit independently on the imaginations of multiple persons.
    Hive mentality here

    I cut holes with a holesaw in my tops that fits a wide mouth mason jar. I can buy half-gallon mason jars locally, which make great feeders ( you can check them at a distance). Since the holesaw leaves a circular cutout piece, I just nail it to a scrap board that is larger than the hole. This makes a lid or cover for the hole that will not blow away. The bees will readily propolize the 1/8" internal gap which makes a good seal.

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