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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jul 2003
    Location
    Bartonville, TX USA
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    456

    Default soldering a copper tube into jar feeder

    on Randy Oliver's web site he has a picture of a jar feeder with a copper pipe soldered into the tiop. He then drills a hole into the top cover and the tube fits down into the body. Any others who use this method, ideas on pipe size and length, pro's and con's??

    Thx.
    "Beware of all enterprises that require new clothes"
    Henry David Thoreau, Walden

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Apr 2003
    Location
    Greenville, TX, USA
    Posts
    4,379

    Default

    I believe it's a 1/8" flared fitting for use in copper compression fittings. I found them in the plunbing spare parts at Lowes and HD for about .80 each.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    Crawfordville, FL
    Posts
    2,569

    Default

    I think they're using a tube insert for a compression fitting.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Hays, Kansas, USA
    Posts
    1,080

    Default

    Why wouldn't silicone sealant work to hold the tube in place? Soldering dissimilar metals is a challange and the heat would cause premature corrosion of the tin jar lid IMO.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Location
    Manitoba Canada
    Posts
    19

    Default

    I tried it this year, but it didn't work for me. The jars seemed to work fine indoors, but when I used them outside the sun warmed up the jar and all the syrup leaked out drowning my mating nukes!!! What a mess!! Unless I missed something, but I copied Randy Oliver's method that I found in the ABJ. Does anybody has any ideas on what I might have done wrong???

  6. #6
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Hays, Kansas, USA
    Posts
    1,080

    Default

    Without seeing it with my own eyes, I'd assume the tube was too large a diameter or somehow air was getting into the jar allowing the syrup to drain. Only a guess, though.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Location
    Seattle, Washington State
    Posts
    4,398

    Default

    why not just ask randy oliver?
    Chef Isaac..Culinary Arts and Honey are a sweet mix! http://www.sweetascanbeehoneyfarm.com & http://www.adoptahive.info

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Location
    Manitoba Canada
    Posts
    19

    Default

    The tube size was 1/8" As far as I know it should work just fine. The lid was sealed tightly as well.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    owensboro,ky
    Posts
    2,240

    Default tubes

    why bother at all when a 1 gallon paint can or a pickle jar with some holes punched in the lid with a frame nail works so well and is so easy?
    "Wine is a constant proof that God loves us and loves to see us happy" Ben Franklin

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Apr 2003
    Location
    Greenville, TX, USA
    Posts
    4,379

    Default

    It's nice that it only takes a 1/4" hole in the lid. Mine worked great, but a quart paint can with 3 holes in the lid works as well and it's cheaper and easier.

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Location
    Berkey, OH, USA
    Posts
    1,487

    Default

    Hi all
    After trying to solder the 1/8" copper lengths to fruit jar lids I took someone on here's advice and used epoxy. That did the trick, but the tubes let too much syrup out. It worked ok in the house, like Lance said, but in the field too much syrup came out.
    So I squeezed the end of the tube closed about 40% with pliers.

    Reason it works better than pickle jars is because you can stick a pint or quart jar of syrup over a 2 frame mating nuc (or whatever) and just drill a 1/4" or so hole through the top.

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Location
    Sacramento,California,USA
    Posts
    3,660

    Default

    As the sun comes up and the day starts warming, the liquid in the jar will start expanding and squirt out into the nuc or hive. I use various containers inside an empty box on top, or use inner hive frame feeders, so I don't get the expansion of the liquid from sunlight shining thru a jar or bottle.

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    College Station, Texas
    Posts
    6,973

    Default

    I have a handful of feeders made up for mating nucs. I use a nail to make the hole in the lid and I use a bit of old telescoping radio antenna for the 'feeding' tube. the seal is made by using a hot glue gun. any and all types of exposed glass feeders here (texas) must be shielded from the sun to prevent evacuation of the content via temperature and pressure (I think mr marler suggested the same thing).

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    hamburg, new york, usa
    Posts
    440

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Ross View Post
    but a quart paint can with 3 holes in the lid works as well and it's cheaper and easier.
    How do you see Ross how much is used?

  15. #15
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    Cleveland, Texas
    Posts
    1,378

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by pcelar View Post
    How do you see Ross how much is used?
    I use the same method, and you get pretty good at estimating based on the weight of the can when you lift it slightly.
    "The UNKNOWN, huh? That would be SNORBERT ZANGOX over in Waycross."

  16. #16
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    El Dorado County, CA
    Posts
    605

    Default

    i was ready to try some .22 shells and jb weld but while thinking about it i came up with the question of why even bother with a tube? i like the idea of only having a quarter inch hole in the cover but why not just a single hole in the jar lid and no tube?
    all that is gold does not glitter

  17. #17
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Location
    Berkey, OH, USA
    Posts
    1,487

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by RayMarler View Post
    As the sun comes up and the day starts warming, the liquid in the jar will start expanding and squirt out into the nuc or hive. I use various containers inside an empty box on top, or use inner hive frame feeders, so I don't get the expansion of the liquid from sunlight shining thru a jar or bottle.
    OK thanks Ray that explains it! I tested it repeatedly inside the house and it did not leak. I think it is a combination of a vacuum and surface tension.

    But surprised that they do seem to leak sometimes even though I squeezed off the tube to make it smaller.

  18. #18
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    hamburg, new york, usa
    Posts
    440

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Gene Weitzel View Post
    I use the same method, and you get pretty good at estimating based on the weight of the can when you lift it slightly.
    Let me ask out of curiosity, why don't you guys use glass jar with couple 1/16" holes in the cover?

  19. #19
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    Knoxville, TN
    Posts
    1,933

    Default

    The size of a hole in the hive lid is important to consider in
    my area. I tried glass jars, and
    plastic buckets with holes over a ~2" diameter hole in the
    lid. In winter, it killed bees pretty good with leaking rain
    water. Any other time of year, rain leaked in around the
    jars pretty good. Then when I was done feeding, I had to seal
    up the holes with caulk and a covering, as anything else would
    leak. A small hole could probably be filled with duct tape till the
    bees propolized it.
    I imagine if you drilled a very small hole
    in the lid, then did not use a tube, it would be pretty darn hard
    to hit the hole. I haven't tried the tubes yet, but have a pack
    ready to install, with some half gallon glass jars. We'll see how
    it goes, at some point.

  20. #20
    Join Date
    Apr 2003
    Location
    Greenville, TX, USA
    Posts
    4,379

    Default

    I have 2" and 3" holes in virtually all of my tops. I just lay a loose board over them when not in use. Rain leaking in has never been an issue. I'm not saying it doesn't leak in, but I haven't lost a hive (out of 50 now) in several years. Mine are on SBB, so the water doesn't stay around. I would look for other causes.

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