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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Silverado, CA
    Posts
    16

    Default Trap out failure

    I tried my first trap out. I coned the entrance and put a hive under it 3 weeks ago. The house is old and leaky, so I kept adding screen to it and stapling the openings closed. They just keep getting it. I opened the hive today, and got attacked bad. Even with smoke, they were super aggressive.
    The landlord called, a tenant got chased inside, I returned an hour later and they were waiting. I took the hive down, double bagged and buried it to kill them. I took the cone and some screen down, and my veil, clothing and gloves took hundreds of stings. I took about 6 stings to the arms. A quarter mile hike still had them after me.
    So, I told the land lord to call a bee removal company to pull the wall and kill them. Was that the right thing?
    I suspect they are Africanized, or just super surly.
    I also split my other hives today, and they were all fairly mean when I worked with them. Weather is fine, 80 degrees, light winds. What happend?

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    Fairfield, Virginia
    Posts
    1,003

    Default

    Sounds like you probably got it right, never had bees that bad here, though we don't have AHB's yet anyway.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    owensboro,ky
    Posts
    2,243

    Default ahb

    your other hives smell the venom from the cut-out stings. good luck,mike
    "Wine is a constant proof that God loves us and loves to see us happy" Ben Franklin

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Location
    Sawyer, Michigan, USA
    Posts
    2,118

    Default

    Mike has a good point, if you suit has taken a lot of stings or is just getting foul form sweating launder it. It will make a difference when you come in contact with other hives.
    The Busy Bee teaches two lessons: One is not to be idle and the other is not to get stung.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Location
    Seattle, Washington State
    Posts
    4,417

    Default

    Sil:

    I am not following you here. Why did the trap out fail? Were they getting back into the cone? Did they find another entrance?
    Chef Isaac..Culinary Arts and Honey are a sweet mix! http://www.sweetascanbeehoneyfarm.com & http://www.adoptahive.info

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Location
    Oxford, Kansas
    Posts
    1,988

    Default

    I dont think they are AHB but there could be a possibility. Was they agressive before you started the trap out. I assume they wasnt or you wouldnt have been able to get the trap on without getting tore up. There is several factors that could get the bees agitated. Did you have the opening of the new hive as close as possible to the original opening of the hive. If you didnt they will cluster outside the base of the cone trying to get back in. this can make them aggressive. Look at it this way if you came home from work and found the locks changed on your home and you couldnt get back in would you be agitated? IMO I wouldnt try a trap out where getting them sealed out would be a problem the best way is to go the cut out route. If you was called to remove the bees the landlord looks at you to be the bee removal company. I would remove the cone let the bees back in. They will settle down. Study up on cutouts get with the owner and go to work. you just has well make the money.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Silverado, CA
    Posts
    16

    Default trap ou

    I say it failed, mostly because of the structure. The building is kind of high, so lots of ladder work. The failure was I could not seal the buidling well enough. I agree the bees were pissed from the lock out. There may be more than one queen. The owner is cheap, I was using it as a learning experiance.
    I washed my coveralls. Good idea about all the venom driving them crazy!

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Location
    Seattle, Washington State
    Posts
    4,417

    Default

    I wouldnt give up. I am doing one like that right now in Seattle. It is best if you take steel wool and pack it into places where you might see bees using it as an entrance.
    Chef Isaac..Culinary Arts and Honey are a sweet mix! http://www.sweetascanbeehoneyfarm.com & http://www.adoptahive.info

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Silverado, CA
    Posts
    16

    Default

    I talked to the resident, land lord today. She wanted me to do the cut out for free, so I declined. The entire strucure is just too full of holes. It is a cut out candidate. It was a good learning experience. I would consider the cut out for maybe 500 or so, but I don't see that happening.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Location
    Oxford, Kansas
    Posts
    1,988

    Default

    I wouldnt have done the cone for free.

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Silverado, CA
    Posts
    16

    Default smart

    You are smart, riverrat. I was trying to learn and help a neighbor, but I learned my lesson!

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