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  1. #1
    SueBeeH Guest

    Default Question: beetle control

    Iam a brand new beekeeper with one hive, going well, but discovered a few beetles. I'ma aware of the trap using DTE (diatomaceous earth). Question: we have pool grade DTE, and I've read that you cannot use that in the hive. Can anyone tell me why?
    Thanks,
    SueBeeH

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    owensboro,ky
    Posts
    2,243

    Default bugs

    not fine enough
    "Wine is a constant proof that God loves us and loves to see us happy" Ben Franklin

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    piperton,Tennessee,usa
    Posts
    369

    Default

    Most SHB I see are flying in from feral hives. Best option is strong hive, Remove any suspected hiding spaces, and or give your bees less real estate to cover.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    Cleveland, Texas
    Posts
    1,385

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by mike haney View Post
    not fine enough
    Actually, filter grade DE contains a lot of much finer particles and can present a risk of silicosis from breathing the dust. Food grade DE (which is what is used for pest control) is graded to be fine enough for effective insect control, but not so fine as to present the risk of silicosis. One should always wear a good aspirator when handling filter grade DE.
    "The UNKNOWN, huh? That would be SNORBERT ZANGOX over in Waycross."

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    owensboro,ky
    Posts
    2,243

    Smile fine

    thanks for correcting me. i had it backwards
    "Wine is a constant proof that God loves us and loves to see us happy" Ben Franklin

  6. #6
    SueBeeH Guest

    Default Question: Beetle control

    thanks for all the helpful answers. As I understand it, the danger is to the human handling the DE. The pool grade DE will not harm the bees? We only have one hive, have a pool and have handled the DE safely for years.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Location
    Dallas, TX
    Posts
    374

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    I'm beginning to wonder if taking any measures is really worth the trouble.

    This is my second season, and I have a strong hive, and the beetles are under control.

    I had a sandwich trap with banana and oil last week, and I got only one beetle. Not effective. Next step will be AJ's, which I haven't installed yet, but I wonder if it's more for me, or for the bees. I highly doubt that I will be rid of them.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    Cleveland, Texas
    Posts
    1,385

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by arthur View Post
    I'm beginning to wonder if taking any measures is really worth the trouble.

    This is my second season, and I have a strong hive, and the beetles are under control.

    I had a sandwich trap with banana and oil last week, and I got only one beetle. Not effective. Next step will be AJ's, which I haven't installed yet, but I wonder if it's more for me, or for the bees. I highly doubt that I will be rid of them.
    I have very little problems with strong colonies. I use my traps mostly in nucs and new cut outs that have been weakened by the stress of the removal. If you have a yard full of strong hives and you move in a nuc or a weak hive, the beetles will gravitate to the weak hive very quickly and overrun it.
    "The UNKNOWN, huh? That would be SNORBERT ZANGOX over in Waycross."

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