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  1. #21
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Sparta, Tennessee
    Posts
    2,139

    Default

    I welcome my honeybee inspectors in both NY and PA. Both Gents are super and I've learned much and they've learned a few things from me.

  2. #22
    Join Date
    Jan 2001
    Location
    New York City
    Posts
    3,401

    Default

    The building inspector may not be as fine a craftsman as I, but
    his sign-off is required before I can call my work "finished". If
    he and I disagree, he can refuse to approve my work, and force
    me to fix it before the structure can be "occupied". The goal
    here is public safety.

    The health inspector may not have any skills at all, but if he
    finds that my honey house is dirty, he can shut me down until
    it is as clean as he wants it. After all, he is merely protecting
    the public from unsanitary food, and honey is food.

    The automobile inspector may not be a good mechanic at all,
    but if he does not like the condition of my brakes, exhaust,
    tires, lights, or whatever, he can refuse to give me a sticker
    until I fix them to his satisfaction. Without a sticker, the car
    can't be driven anywhere but between home and the repair
    shop(s) of my choice.

    The ATF can stop by any time they like, and when they do
    stop by, one can assume that they are not visiting about
    the alcohol or the tobacco. They have powers that can
    result in convictions and prison time for even the most
    shaky flaky accusations, such as this one.

    The bee inspector may not be as good a beekeeper as you
    or I, but if he wants to, he can send off some samples to a
    lab and if the LAB says I have foulbrood, his boss can force
    me to destroy the hives.

    Somehow, it seems that the bee inspector has nowhere near
    the unilateral power of the other kinds of inspectors. Why all
    the hatred of the guy with the LEAST power?

  3. #23
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    College Station, Texas
    Posts
    6,973

    Default

    it is quite the pleasure when I get to ride around here with the state bee inspector, about 1/2 day twice a year. I appreciate his time and the information I acquire is worth every dollar I might ever spend for whatever permit I might be applying for....

    we have a limited hive registration permit here... if you have under about 10 hives and don't move them across county lines you don't really need to register.

  4. #24
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    46,384

    Default

    I have to pay the inspector to come out. $150. I went through the hives with him the first year, but after that I haven't bothered. He's always been careful and respectful of my hives.
    Michael Bush bushfarms.com/bees.htm "Everything works if you let it." ThePracticalBeekeeper.com 40y 200h 37yTF

  5. #25
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    St. Albans, Vermont
    Posts
    5,503

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Michael Bush View Post
    I have to pay the inspector to come out. $150. I went through the hives with him the first year, but after that I haven't bothered.
    How much will he do for $150? One yard? One day?

  6. #26
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Location
    White County, Arkansas
    Posts
    874

    Default

    I've met both of our inspectors and their boss, during training. One was my beekeeping class instructor and the other is often at one of the local beekeepers club meetings. The only reason I would want to be there is for the training available and reaffirmation to what I may already know. I trust them all with my hives since they are also beeks and one has a spouse that is a commercial beek, so that is some insight I normally wouldn't regularily get.

    Registartion is required and free and inspections are if we want them or if we want to move a managed hive and also free.

  7. #27

    Default

    I've never seen the arse cloth of my inspector. He has not shown it to me and I've not asked.

    This is in a way a discussion for those in Ohio only, they got all kinds of politics there.

    Give Ceasar his due, it is his pic on the coin.

    So this is a rant about something that could happen? Lord I did not know I could complain here about the possibilities...

    I can't shoot a tin can or a black bear from 20 feet so my inspector has nothing to worry about, but maybe Mr Green Thumb is a Mr Happy Trigger FInger?

  8. #28
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    Massillon, Ohio
    Posts
    3,433

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by MrGreenThumb View Post

    I seen beekeepers and inspectors wearing dirty [edit by mod] cloths covered with bee goo from numerous other colonies. Some of these colonies were healthy while others were sick.
    Without calling out any names, I'm just curious where you witnessed an inspector moving recklessly between healthy and sick colonies covered in bee goo?

    Our Stark County Inspector was the same gentleman who inspected the 200+ registered colonies in Carroll County last year. I'm sure it wasn't him you're referring to.
    Last edited by Barry; 06-04-2008 at 07:49 AM.
    To everything there is a season....

  9. #29
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    46,384

    Default

    >How much will he do for $150? One yard? One day?

    One yard.
    Michael Bush bushfarms.com/bees.htm "Everything works if you let it." ThePracticalBeekeeper.com 40y 200h 37yTF

  10. #30
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Location
    Washington County, NY
    Posts
    115

    Default Is hive registration required in NY?

    Just curious if I missed something, and where I could find out.

  11. #31
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    New Albany, Ohio
    Posts
    350

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by MrGreenThumb View Post
    My bees are ... ...away from the city, pesticides and pollution...
    You'd have to be living on another planet for that to be a realistic statement.

    Quote Originally Posted by MrGreenThumb View Post
    I fear that if a bee inspector pays my bees a visit they will then come down with 'something' bad...
    As aforementioned, you sign a non-inspection waiver.

    Quote Originally Posted by MrGreenThumb View Post
    ...its like going to the hospital for a check up but leaving there in a body bag.
    Can't help you there. Bad things happen to good people.

    Quote Originally Posted by MrGreenThumb View Post
    I seen beekeepers and inspectors wearing dirty ass cloths covered with bee goo from numerous other colonies.
    So, I have to assume you've been along on inspections and witnessed these actions first hand? "Bee goo"? Not dirty knees from kneeling in someone's muddy apiary? Not propolis stains from experience? You have some secret detergent that removes propolis stains? Everything I've ever worn in the apiary has propolis stains on it.

    Quote Originally Posted by MrGreenThumb View Post
    What is to stop a bee inspector from spreading sickness from one colony to the other when checking numurous apiaries in a weeks time?
    Protocol requires that, when a disease is identified in an apiary, the inspector stops what he's doing after closing that hive and washes/sterilizes his equipment before proceeding on. After inspecting each apiary, the inspector also washes/sterilizes his equipment. If you knew anything about the Ohio program, you'd know that. Or, you'd report the incident. But you wouldn't be here, slandering others in cyber-space...

    Quote Originally Posted by MrGreenThumb View Post
    I do not need other peoples bee problems spread in my apiary.
    So, if your neighbor has a dead out that your bees rob, your bees somehow cleanse themselves before returning home. You should market your queens. Varroa would cease to exist...

    You've been more than a little critical of a program that, for the most part, is provided free of charge for you. All the inspectors I've interacted with have been helpful, courteous, and EXPERIENCED individuals. And they don't get paid much for their service.

    As for not registering your hives, statistical information is necessary for determining funding, or the exclusion of, for programs like Ohio's Inspection Program. So, you may be partly responsible for the loss of this program. Congratulations. This program will most likely be axed, thanks to State budget cuts, and disappear after this year.

    So where should all our new beginning beekeepers go for help? Should we list you as a contact for all beginning beekeepers in Ohio, in case they would like some advice or help with their hives?
    Last edited by John Gesner; 06-04-2008 at 08:12 AM. Reason: various

  12. #32
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Location
    Starkville,Ms,USA
    Posts
    516

    Default

    I've never seen the arse cloth of my inspector.
    I was deeply offended by this description.

    Seriously, I would think bee inspectors are more viewed as a great resource rather than a nuisance.

  13. #33
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Location
    Columbus, Ohio
    Posts
    546

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Dr.Wax View Post
    I was deeply offended by this description.

    Seriously, I would think bee inspectors are more viewed as a great resource rather than a nuisance.
    I'm not wanting to post to "engage in battle" or anything, but in my own personal opinion, which may be flawed at times, feel that the Ohio Apiary Inspection/Registration program is excellent. I feel the state has taken the responsibility to measure disease, parasites, hives, etc to monitor the (kept) bee populations in the state. They offer thorough records online, http://www.ohioagriculture.gov/plant...ionSummary.pdf ) which could help spot trends (good or bad) and outbreaks of pathogens, disease, etc. Check out the web page...

    http://www.ohioagriculture.gov/plant...t-ap-index.stm

    The cost is $5.00 per year for each apiary, and might as well be free as far as I'm concerned. Inspector will come out at least once per year, and spend time with you if you wish, and will leave a written report on his findings if you aren't available. You are allowed the option of "opting-out" of the inspections with this form...

    http://www.ohioagriculture.gov/oda3/...t_4201-001.pdf

    What more could you ask for. I don't feel its regulated or anything, I think its a genuine concern from the state of Ohio about its agriculture.

    I now keep my bees in Madison County (Plain City) area, and do allow inspections by the bee inspector. Brad, I think, is his name.

    Like the program or not, you can complete a No Consent Form and be on your merry way...
    Find A Beekeeper - Swarm List
    "There's nothing wrong with me, it's the rest of the world that has a problem"

  14. #34
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    El Dorado County, CA
    Posts
    605

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by HarryVanderpool View Post
    Thats all I needed to read.
    I really hope your inspector has his book of matches handy.
    :P
    if i had concerns over inspectors it would be that i might have to deal with someone with the above attitude regarding not treating hives with chemicals.
    all that is gold does not glitter

  15. #35
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    Brasher Falls, NY, USA
    Posts
    27,802

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by space bee View Post
    Just curious if I missed something, and where I could find out.
    You can contact the NY State Apiculturalist at 1-800-554-5401, ext 2087 or 518-457-2087. His name is Paul Cappy and he can answer all of you questions and tell you who your "local" Apiary Inspector is.
    Mark Berninghausen To combat Ebola, please consider supporting http://www.doctorswithoutborders.org


  16. #36
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    Atlanta, GA
    Posts
    174

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by jdpro5010 View Post
    You ought to do little research in Ohio registration before making such wide and ignorant statements. You have to register because it is the law. You do not have to allow the inspector into your hives. When you register they will also send you an authorization slip of sorts, You can mark the spot that says do not inspect my hives and they will not and cannot inspect your hives(it's the law) but you still have to register. Now why would you not want to register? It gives your local pesticide applicators (in theory) notice of where your hives are and then if there is a poisoning you have some recourse. Without registration you are making them faultless if they kill your bees. Seems illogical and unharmful to register to me and I dislike Big Brother as much or more than the next guy.:confused:
    Why not be nice when giving advice. He might be uniformed of the details of the law, but as far as I can tell he's a lot nicer guy than you!

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