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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    Cuyahoga Falls, Ohio USA
    Posts
    312

    Default Anyone else NOT want the bee inspector messing with their hives??

    Non of my colonies are sick, all made it through winter and I never treated any of them. My bees are located in the hills of Carrol county...away from the city, pesticides and pollution and doing fine. I fear that if a bee inspector pays my bees a visit they will then come down with 'something' bad...its like going to the hospital for a check up but leaving there in a body bag.

    I seen beekeepers and inspectors wearing dirty [edit by mod] cloths covered with bee goo from numerous other colonies. Some of these colonies were healthy while others were sick.

    What is to stop a bee inspector from spreading sickness from one colony to the other when checking numurous apiaries in a weeks time???? I do not want to take the chance so I had not even listed/registered my bees. I do not need other peoples bee problems spread in my apiary. I would be the first to burn a hive if it had AFB...I do not a bee inspector, [edit by mod] telling me what I should do.

    thx
    Last edited by Barry; 06-04-2008 at 07:42 AM. Reason: profanity

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Leetonia, Ohio
    Posts
    389

    Default

    You ought to do little research in Ohio registration before making such wide and ignorant statements. You have to register because it is the law. You do not have to allow the inspector into your hives. When you register they will also send you an authorization slip of sorts, You can mark the spot that says do not inspect my hives and they will not and cannot inspect your hives(it's the law) but you still have to register. Now why would you not want to register? It gives your local pesticide applicators (in theory) notice of where your hives are and then if there is a poisoning you have some recourse. Without registration you are making them faultless if they kill your bees. Seems illogical and unharmful to register to me and I dislike Big Brother as much or more than the next guy.:confused:

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    Massillon, Ohio
    Posts
    3,403

    Default

    You can also jot down your phone number and make a note on your registration stating that you must be contacted prior to inspection and you wish to accompany the inspector when he makes his visit. Columbus will have these notes typed right out on the inspectors forms.

    I've done it before and they always follow the instructions perfectly. My request was not because I don't trust the inspector... but because I enjoyed going through the colonies with him, talking bees, and picking his brain a bit.

    The inspectors I've met down this way are well aware of the risks of spreading disease and they are very vigilant in taking necessary precautions to prevent it. It's their job, and the last thing they want to do is spread diseases.

    It's in your best interest to register your colonies every year, even if you request they not be inspected. If there is an outbreak in your apiary location, and you're not registered, you will never get a friendly notice to take precautions. Actually, it's really not an option to ignore registering your apiaries. It's a requirement, not a request.
    Last edited by Mike Gillmore; 06-02-2008 at 03:22 PM.
    To everything there is a season....

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Location
    Tucson, Arizona, USA
    Posts
    5,324

    Default

    I once kept bees in Ohio. Back when I was a teenager. I had two hives on my great uncle's farm in Key, Ohio. I don't know if registration was required back then, but it probably was, I just wasn't aware of it.

    I'm a little older now, but I am aware that I presently live in one of the few states where there is no registration or inspection for honeybees.
    48 years - 50 hives - TF
    Joseph Clemens -- Website Under Constructioni

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Location
    Buda, Texas
    Posts
    922

    Default

    All in all, I am glad for the bee inspector. I would like to be present, if possible, when the inspector arrives, so that I can pick his brain for local knowledge and conditions. Of course, I also prefer to be present when ANYONE steps foot on my property so I can keep an eye on things.
    I would think and hope that inspectors are trained in proper procedures to prevent the spread of diseases; I would also think and hope that healthcare workers are trained in proper procedure to prevent the spread of diseases, yet, they are a source of lots of hospital-acquired infections. In both instances, it is prudent to keep a watchful eye out yourself.
    "I am the Good Shepherd. The Good Shepherd lays down His life for the sheep. " John 10:11

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    Manitoba Canada
    Posts
    5,847

    Default

    Its in your best interests to have your colonies surveyed.

    Its kind of a long shot fearing disease contamination of your hives from a dirty suit.

    But your right to a point. Why is thier coverals dirty? Not like they are working the hives. If you ask me, they should try to keep up good apperances to avoid this exactly impression amoungst some beekeepers.

    Make a suggestion to your local extentions office! My inspector wears a clean suit, why shouldnt yours?
    Ian Steppler >> Canadian Beekeeper's Blog
    www.stepplerfarms.com

  7. #7
    gingerivers Guest

    Arrow

    Our inspector in NC is as nice a fellow as you'd ever want to meet, helpful and friendly, not overbearing or dirty. Uses your hive tool rather than his to minimize spread of disease. Knows his stuff, examined hives, friendly, looked at used equipment for presence of AFB.

    I'd want to know rather than not and take the chance of losing colonies. We don't have to register here but I wouldn't hesitate to have him in my beeyard. Welcome anytime.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Hancock County, TN
    Posts
    82

    Default

    Guess its time an inspector jumps in on this discussion.
    Now here in TN. we have the right by law to go on your property and do an inspection of your bees whether you are registered or not. If not registered we will fill out a form for you and send it in to Nashville. But in the case of the three inspectors in our Assoc. we don't go on an inspection unless we are asked by the beekeeper, I for one don't want anyone walking around my property either without an invite. So we always set up an appointment with the beek before we go there. Also we don't do anything except look at frames after the beekeeper has taken his own hive apart for us, now I carry extra jars in case we need to send anything off to Knoxville to get checked, such as tracheal mite problem or such. We carry alcohol to clean anything we use but the beekeeper is supposed to use his own equipment while we are doing any inspection. I personally don't take any of my tools with me to do an inspection except jacket and nitral gloves . Those get thrown away after use of them. Jacket is washed more often than necessary but worth the time and effort to keep Uncle Sam haters off our back.
    Sideline beekeeper /State Certified Inspector
    Bee Friends CO-OP

  9. #9
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    Concord, CA
    Posts
    4,119

    Default

    From what I understand here in CA, we don't have an inspector or registration. I think it would be nice if we did incase I suspected a problem.

    Correct me if I'm wrong about CA inspectors.

    Dan

  10. #10
    Join Date
    May 2002
    Location
    San Mateo, CA
    Posts
    4,844

    Default None in San Mateo County

    We have not had registration or inspections here for about twenty years. The guy who inspected back then knew little about beekeeping, they did it for the money the state would send them for doing it, he now the Ag Commisioner.

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Location
    Greensboro, N.C.
    Posts
    5,080

    Default

    Another NC beek reporting in.

    We have a group of VERY knowledgeable beeks inspecting and they are headed up by Don Hopkins, about the friendliest, most helpful, courteous, ETC. person you would ever want to meet. I just wish he weren't so busy that I feel like I'm imposing if I ask him to come by when i don't really have a problem. He is just a pleasure to have in the beeyard.

  12. #12
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    Campobello, SC, USA
    Posts
    195

    Default

    I would actually prefer if our state had them, although I wouldn't like the idea of registering hives if it were just a way to charge taxes. By the way, does anyone know if we do have a way to register hives or get inspections in SC?
    I've not found anywhere on the internet that mentions it in our state. If so, is it required? Who do you contact?

    -Thanks, Daniel

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Location
    Greensboro, N.C.
    Posts
    5,080

    Default

    dhood, this may help.

    http://www.scstatebeekeepers.org/

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    piperton,Tennessee,usa
    Posts
    369

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by deantn View Post
    Guess its time an inspector jumps in on this discussion.
    Now here in TN. we have the right by law to go on your property and do an inspection of your bees whether you are registered or not. If not registered we will fill out a form for you and send it in to Nashville. But in the case of the three inspectors in our Assoc. we don't go on an inspection unless we are asked by the beekeeper, I for one don't want anyone walking around my property either without an invite. So we always set up an appointment with the beek before we go there. Also we don't do anything except look at frames after the beekeeper has taken his own hive apart for us, now I carry extra jars in case we need to send anything off to Knoxville to get checked, such as tracheal mite problem or such. We carry alcohol to clean anything we use but the beekeeper is supposed to use his own equipment while we are doing any inspection. I personally don't take any of my tools with me to do an inspection except jacket and nitral gloves . Those get thrown away after use of them. Jacket is washed more often than necessary but worth the time and effort to keep Uncle Sam haters off our back.

    Failed to mention the fine for unregistered hives. What is it now $500.00?

  15. #15
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    Salem, Oregon
    Posts
    948

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by MrGreenThumb View Post
    ".....and I never treated any of them. "

    Thats all I needed to read.
    I really hope your inspector has his book of matches handy.
    :P
    I have exactly ONE hive more than you.
    That makes my opinion beyond question.

  16. #16
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    Cuyahoga Falls, Ohio USA
    Posts
    312

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by HarryVanderpool View Post
    Thats all I needed to read.
    I really hope your inspector has his book of matches handy.
    :P
    I can spot AFB and EFB...non of my hives have them. So, no need to burn them Harry.

  17. #17
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    hamburg, new york, usa
    Posts
    440

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by MrGreenThumb View Post
    Non of my colonies are sick, all made it through winter and I never treated any of them. My bees are located in the hills of Carrol county...away from the city, pesticides and pollution and doing fine. I fear that if a bee inspector pays my bees a visit they will then come down with 'something' bad...its like going to the hospital for a check up but leaving there in a body bag.

    I seen beekeepers and inspectors wearing dirty [edit by mod] cloths covered with bee goo from numerous other colonies. Some of these colonies were healthy while others were sick.
    In Europe we had a veterinarian come and inspect our hives. In Europe vets are trained in these things. It was good that knowledgeable person come in and have a look at our colonies. He always wore new clean disposable bee suit. Nobody ever complained of cross contamination.
    Last edited by Barry; 06-04-2008 at 07:41 AM.

  18. #18
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    Brown County, IN
    Posts
    2,025

    Default

    Here in Indiana we have a very competent and knowledgeable Apiary Inspector, Kathleen Prough. Her primary focus has always been teaching and helping beekeepers keep healthy hives. I try to take advantage of every opportunity to learn from her. She's an ally, not an adversary.

  19. #19
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Location
    Columbus, Ohio
    Posts
    546

    Default

    Do up an Ohio non-consent form found here:

    http://www.ohioagriculture.gov/oda3/...t_4201-001.pdf
    Find A Beekeeper - Swarm List
    "There's nothing wrong with me, it's the rest of the world that has a problem"

  20. #20
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    Brasher Falls, NY, USA
    Posts
    26,743

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by dhood View Post
    I would actually prefer if our state had them, although I wouldn't like the idea of registering hives if it were just a way to charge taxes. By the way, does anyone know if we do have a way to register hives or get inspections in SC?
    I've not found anywhere on the internet that mentions it in our state. If so, is it required? Who do you contact?

    -Thanks, Daniel
    Contact Fred Singleton at 1-843-670-2481. He is a SC Apiary Inspector. He checks my hives every spring before they go back to NY.
    Mark Berninghausen "That which works, persists."

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