Results 1 to 5 of 5
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    Fairfield, Connecticut
    Posts
    597

    Default Capped Queen Cell Question

    I inspected one of my hives after finding some varroa on the IPM board. This is a strong hive and I also found A capped queen cell. The queen is laying well but they are plugging everything up with syrup.
    It is a 5 frame nuc that I got 2 weeks ago and put in 10 frame deep hive and they haven't drawn out 70% yet. Its almost there a couple of days and I will put another medium super on for them to draw and lay in.
    Should I cut out the Queen cells or should I just let them be? I got these bees 16 days ago. I could also do a small split into a nuc or I could put the frame with the Queen cell into a observation hive.(1 deep frame) It would not hurt the hive and I could watch the queen be born with any luck. The Queen cell frame has pollen honey and all stages of brood.
    If it isn't broken, don't try to fix it. If you build it, they will fill it.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    College Station, Texas
    Posts
    6,973

    Default

    It is sounds like the nuc got a bit stessed and built a queen cell... the reason for this are numerous (although lack of places to lay would be my first thought). It is your call... although there would be nothing really wrong with removing this cell (plus frame) and placing this in an observation hive. If you did remove this cell I would definitely mark this nuc to be reinspected in a week or so to just make certain that it was not repeated, which would suggest some flaw in the queen.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    Fairfield, Connecticut
    Posts
    597

    Default

    I think it is lack of a place to lay as they have been plugging up the brood nest with syrup and I have stopped feeding because there is a flow here.
    If it isn't broken, don't try to fix it. If you build it, they will fill it.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    College Station, Texas
    Posts
    6,973

    Default

    if you are new to bee keeping then having some 'feel' for the flow is one of the most difficult things to learn. 40+ years later sometimes I am still left scratching my head since a flow can come and go like the flip of a light switch.

    with the first appearance of a queen cell you didn't automatically think the queen was flaw it does appear you have figured some things out (which is... in bee keeping there is rarely one cause for one reaction). pat yourself on the back... by all appearce you are proceeding down the proper path.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    46,212

    Default

    Define "strong hive". If it's really crowded or if it's the equivalent of a double deep, they may be trying to swarm. The backfilling with nectar leads me that direction.

    If it's not that crowded, then it's probably a supersedure.

    Either way I would not destroy the queen cells. I'd split if you think it's a swarm. I'd leave them alone if it's a supersedure.
    Michael Bush bushfarms.com/bees.htm "Everything works if you let it." ThePracticalBeekeeper.com 40y 200h 37yTF

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
Ads