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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Iowa
    Posts
    94

    Default Painting hive parts

    Ihave been using exterior latex paint on my hive bodies etc.. But if i put them into service in less than a month the surfaces seem to stick together from the uncured paint. I was wondering looking for some suggestions on keeping them from sticking

    Dan

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    Lake county, Indiana 46408-4109
    Posts
    3,536

    Default

    I have one gal of paint that does that, seams like it don`t dry, won`t buy any more of that.
    Ed, KA9CTT profanity is IGNORANCE made audible
    you can`t fix stupid not even with duct tape

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    Anchorage, Alaska
    Posts
    1,649

    Default

    off the top of my head, i too will say it's probably the paint. i get the $5.00 gallon color mis-mixed paint at the hardware store when i see it. i had a gallon of it once that never seemed to quite completely dry.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Apr 2003
    Location
    Greenville, TX, USA
    Posts
    4,327

    Default

    Tractor supply has paint hardener. I don't know what type of paint it will work in.

  5. #5

    Default

    A lot of latex paint take a full 30 days to fully cure. I would bet that this what is going on. I wouldn't worry about it just use your hive tool to get them apart. Speaking as a painting contractor.
    My-smokepole

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    SE Texas
    Posts
    82

    Default

    I let it dry for a week or two to make sure all the smell is gone, then I put beeswax on the top and bottom surfaces. Problem solved.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    VENTURA, California, USA
    Posts
    3,604

    Smile Try the acrylic exterior paints.

    They dry to the touch in 30-40 minutes with low humidity.
    I painted the primer and two cover coats in one day. Two days later the bees were the hives.
    I painted the bottoms with the hive body upside down and they were flipped over to paint the covers.
    Regards,
    Ernie Lucas Apiaries
    Ernie
    My websitehttp://bees4u.com/

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Sparta, Tennessee
    Posts
    2,129

    Default

    I have had the same problem with boxes sticking to one another after painting and I would imagine the majority of those that paint have also.

    I just pry them apart or pop them apart and use them. If a big chuck of paint comes off touch it up...

    I like the suggestion of putting bees wax over the paint...

    However, I switched from painting to hot dipping my equipment in paraffin and rosin....and I love it! No more painting of woodenware.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    Columbia, South Carolina USA
    Posts
    2,598

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Jeffzhear View Post
    However, I switched from painting to hot dipping my equipment in paraffin and rosin....and I love it! No more painting of woodenware.
    I would love to be set up to do that - but I am such small potatoes that I would never benefit from the economy of scale. If someone in my area was offering it as a service though - I would take advantage. I have never been a fan of painting.

    Keith
    Bee Sting Honey - So Good, It Hurts!

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    Syracuse, NY (upstate)
    Posts
    247

    Default Exterior vs Interior

    I have had the same problem with latex paint sticking together even a few weeks after painting. After looking into the issue, it turns out that exterior paint is designed to stay elastic (and thus stick together if held in contact long enough). The reason exterior latex is designed this way is the extreme changes in temperature and humidity cause wood siding to expand and contract and the paint needs to move with the wood, otherwise it would crack and chip like the old oil based paints.

    -ekrouse

  11. #11
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    Snowmass, Colorado, USA
    Posts
    2,497

    Default Why White?

    Maybe because its easier to see, cheaper, or for whatever reason, but is there anything that shows that white paint is better then others for bees and production or would a good weatherproof stain or other colors be just as effective?

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Pepperell, MA.
    Posts
    3,737

    Default

    White is traditional. I suppose that it might be a little better in hot, sunny areas to keep the hives from over-heating and a little worse than a darker paint when you want the sun to heat the hives up. I chose white because my house and barn is white. They're over 200 years old so I'm always painting something around the house and it's nice to use the same paint on the hives.
    "My wife always wanted girls. Just not thousands and thousands of them......"

  13. #13
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    Snowmass, Colorado, USA
    Posts
    2,497

    Default

    Thats kind of what I figured. I went to the photos forums on this site and they are a rainbow of colors...some very nice. Reason I asked is that I stained mine instead of painting because I had lots on hand and I hate covering up wood grain with paint if I don't have too.

    Thanks for the response.

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Sparta, Tennessee
    Posts
    2,129

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Keith Benson View Post
    I would love to be set up to do that - but I am such small potatoes that I would never benefit from the economy of scale. If someone in my area was offering it as a service though - I would take advantage. I have never been a fan of painting.

    Keith
    Keith, maybe someone on this forum does it in your area...maybe you'll hear something! It really is such the time savings...

  15. #15
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    Catawba, Wisconsin
    Posts
    291

    Default

    I'm a painter by trade. I just prime and apply 2 coats of100% acrylic exterior latex and do not have a problem. Could it be you are trying to put to heavy a coat on at one time? If this happens the paint will form a dry film on the outside but will take a long time to cure out. With oil base it's called solvent entrapment,film forms and solvent can't evaporate, same can happen with latex, moisture can't get out. Just a thought.

    Eddie

  16. #16
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    Pasco, Wa.
    Posts
    109

    Default parafin wax

    I had the same problem when painting my two hives.

    Let the paint dry, of course. Then, got a stick of parafin wax, available in any decent food or dept. store. No need to heat it up, just wax the top/bottom edges of each hive body. No further sticking problems.

    Hope this helps.

  17. #17
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    Cedar Bluff, Virginia, USA
    Posts
    141

    Default

    I use the White Barn and Fence latex paint from lowes. It's nice and cheap and works well. Plus it's made by Valspar so ya know it's good stuff. Give it a try i have had good service out of it and it doesn't break the bank.

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