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  1. #1
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    Haddenham:Buckinghamshire:UK
    Posts
    6

    Question Raising a nuc from a queen cell

    I am a new breeder and recently purchased two complete hives. One hive appeared to be overcrowded and was creating a lot of queen cells. We removed 2 frames with queen cells and placed them in NUc boxes with frames of brood and food. We also moved a large numbe rof house bees and some flying bees at the same time. We dusted all bees in the NUCs with icing sugar and left them shut away for 48hrs. When we opened the NUCS flying bees started to forage and continue to do so. This was done on the advice of another bee keeper. Will new queens emerge from the queen cells in the NUCs? How long before they emerge and take a mating flight? How long should I leave the NUCs before inspecting for new queens. Any advice/criticism welcome

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Troupsburg, NY
    Posts
    4,074

    Default

    Leave them alone for at least 3 weeks.
    "I reject your reality, and substitute my own." Adam Savage

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    45,408

    Default

    Michael Bush bushfarms.com/bees.htm "Everything works if you let it." ThePracticalBeekeeper.com 40y 200h 37yTF

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    lewisberry, Pa, usa
    Posts
    6,080

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by peggjam View Post
    Leave them alone for at least 3 weeks.
    This is not to argue. But I find it much more productive to find out sooner than three weeks if the queen is ok, is laying, a drone layer, etc. I open my nucs to check if all cells are open, etc. I don't see any loss for doing such. Not sure why some say you should not take a peek.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Willington, CT USA
    Posts
    414

    Default

    I try and wait a few weeks only because I used to have a tendancy to look more times than not. I was also told that you can tell quite a bit by observing the outside activity versus digging in every time.

    Michael Bush has lots of great information. I started keeping track of the dates I look, what I see and per Michael's information, what I should expect and when I should expect it. This way, when I do check I have way to gauge things. It works for me.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    owensboro,ky
    Posts
    2,240

    Smile looking

    you can also tell a lot( and i specifically do this to see if swarm cells are present or if queen cells are open) by lifting the nuc/hive body up from the rear off the bottom board and look up into the frames. most times you don't even smoke'em, you just get a quick increase in the tone of thier buzz. i don't think this kind of inspection disturbs them at all. i hope i'm clear- you tilt the hive body minus the bottom board up 90 degrees from the rear look between the frames. good luck, mike
    "Wine is a constant proof that God loves us and loves to see us happy" Ben Franklin

  7. #7
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    Haddenham:Buckinghamshire:UK
    Posts
    6

    Smile Thank You All

    Thank you to all of you who have taken the time to reply to my questions.
    I really do appreciate all your advice and will keenly watch the site in future.

    I am going to curb my enthusiasm and wait until 24th May before taking a peek. If all has gone well I should have a mated queen by then. I can play hunt the queen which I find difficult.

    FYI my colonies are Buckfast /Greek crosses. Very hard working and prolific queens

    Thanks again

    Brian

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