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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Location
    Fredericksburg, Va
    Posts
    795

    Question flipping frames in brood nest

    I saw a practice in the Dee Lusby videos (Biological Beekeeping: http://www.beesource.com/forums/show...ighlight=lusby) that I do not understand. While they were manipulating frames there was a comment that they were flipping the frame to keep the arrow pointed toward the center of the brood nest. This was done when moving a frame from one side of the hive to the other.

    What is the purpose of doing this?
    Bee all you can Bee!
    http://www.hamiltonapiary.net

  2. #2
    Join Date
    May 2002
    Location
    San Mateo, CA
    Posts
    4,804

    Default

    If I had bees that wild I would be flipping out, not flipping frames.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    South San Ysidro, NM
    Posts
    503

    Default

    She is practicing Housel positioning. There have been several discussions on it here.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    Worcester County, Massachusetts
    Posts
    3,543

    Default

    ...if you look at a piece of backlit comb, look in an empty cell...you will see either a "Y" or an "upsidedown Y"...flip the frame and you will see the opposite.

    it appears that in many cases, when building a nest, the bees will consistantly put the "upsidedown Y" facing the center of the nest. all 7 swarm traps we hived were setup like this.

    dee marks the tops of the topbars so she doesn't need to look at the comb to see if it is correct.

    the idea is that when moving a frame from 1 side of the nest to the other, the comb must be flipped in order to maintain this orientation.

    dee claims that she was unable to get the hives to build up more than 3 deep boxes until she started paying attention to this.

    deknow

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Location
    Fredericksburg, Va
    Posts
    795

    Default

    Thanks. After doing the search I found the link to Dee's discussion of the technique.
    http://www.beesource.com/pov/lusby/housel.htm
    Bee all you can Bee!
    http://www.hamiltonapiary.net

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    Fort Worth, Texas, USA
    Posts
    224

    Default

    Hmmm...I started reading about this too, after stumbling across this thread. What I don't quite get is the center comb she (Lusby) describes as having the "Y's" oriented the same direction on both sides. Maybe I'm a little slow, but it doesn't seem to be physically possible. :confused: At any rate I suppose this "center" comb doesn't really exist in a man-made (or woman-made) hive?

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    Columbia, South Carolina USA
    Posts
    2,598

    Default What would Housel Do?

    Does anyone know if Mr. Housel practices Housel Positioning?

    Keith
    Bee Sting Honey - So Good, It Hurts!

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    Fort Worth, Texas, USA
    Posts
    224

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Tim Hall View Post
    Maybe I'm a little slow...
    I am a little slow. I had to sketch it out (hey I'm an illustrator, not an engineer!) before it occurred to me that two hexagons, one being rotated 90 degrees, are not concurrent geometries (like a square or octagon would be).

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    Orlando, FL
    Posts
    1,313

    Default

    Mr. Housel is a member of our local bee club and I have spoken to him about this "Housel positioning".

    Though he did not say whether he does or does not practice it, he did say that he wasn't too pleased with all of the controversy it stirred up. He got a lot of hate mail and nasty emails following this "observation"

    I guess I will have to quiz him more thoroughly on this.

    I have hived a few swarm trapped colonies and I tried to ascertain if this were true and could not confirm the notion. Even if it were confirmed, I question whether following the convention makes any difference to the bees.

    It's just my opinion - but this idea is nothing more than an observation until someone does a double blind study on this feature alone.
    Troy

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    Orlando, FL
    Posts
    1,313

    Default

    It's best just to look at some natural comb to see what they are talking about.

    Here is a good description: http://www.bushfarms.com/beesnaturalcell.htm#housel

    Here is a good picture:
    http://www.bushfarms.com/images/Conf...ombCloseup.JPG

    Maybe I'm slow, but I don't think a square nor an octagon are concurrent when turned thru 90 deg either. In this discussion what is really meant by the word concurrent?

    Did you mean 180 deg?
    Troy

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    Columbia, South Carolina USA
    Posts
    2,598

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Troy View Post
    He got a lot of hate mail and nasty emails following this "observation".
    That is a shame, I don't recall that it was he that was beating the "housel positioning" drum. I guess that is what I was wondering about, does he feel his name is being taken in vain.

    Keith
    Bee Sting Honey - So Good, It Hurts!

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