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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Willington, CT USA
    Posts
    414

    Question Aggressive Hive?

    Anyone ever have a hive that is more aggressive than the others?

    I have one from a swarm (one of my hives) last year that has built up nicely. The queen is also laying like crazy. The problem is that from the beginning they have been more aggressive. I can't seem to do anything without them wanting to tear me up.

    It is getting a little nerve wracking. Any ideas?

    Thanks

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
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    45,481

    Default

    >Anyone ever have a hive that is more aggressive than the others?

    Of course.

    >I have one from a swarm (one of my hives) last year that has built up nicely. The queen is also laying like crazy. The problem is that from the beginning they have been more aggressive. I can't seem to do anything without them wanting to tear me up.
    >It is getting a little nerve wracking. Any ideas?

    If you have reasons to want to keep some of the genetics, remove her and see if her daughter isn't much nicer. If you don't care about the genetics, then put a different queen in.

    If they are too difficult to find the queen:
    http://www.bushfarms.com/beesrequeeninghot.htm
    Michael Bush bushfarms.com/bees.htm "Everything works if you let it." ThePracticalBeekeeper.com 40y 200h 37yTF

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Willington, CT USA
    Posts
    414

    Default

    I dont care about genetics or anything else as long as it calms them down. These things hit my veil like gravel on the under side of a car.

    I made a split out of this hive. Maybe I will pinch the queen from the aggresive hive and do a combine. I have never done this but have your information.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    45,481

    Default

    I would only go for the daughter queen is you want to keep some of the genes. Otherwise, I'd just buy a queen and requeen them to replace all the genetics.
    Michael Bush bushfarms.com/bees.htm "Everything works if you let it." ThePracticalBeekeeper.com 40y 200h 37yTF

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Location
    Buda, Texas
    Posts
    922

    Default

    I'd buy a queen from someone in your area. Bjornbee sells queens, and he probably has very good genetics as his bees survive own their own merits, instead of being kept alive with lots of chemicals. Come to think of it, Michael Bush also sells queens and lives in a cold, harsh, (to my way of thinking, at least) climate so may have bees well-adapted to your area. Neither he nor Bjornbee will come out and blow their own horns and try to sell a queen to you here. If I lived in a colder climate, I would definitely buy from them versus an unknown breeder from a magazine ad.
    "I am the Good Shepherd. The Good Shepherd lays down His life for the sheep. " John 10:11

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Apr 2003
    Location
    Greenville, TX, USA
    Posts
    4,341

    Default

    I would put a queen like that in a nuc to keep her colony small, and use her brood frames to supplement other hives. Why kill a prolific queen when you can manage her to help you?

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Willington, CT USA
    Posts
    414

    Default

    Ross, that is another good idea. That queen is a great layer. These bees have been aggressive since day one. I thought that they would eventually calm down.

    If I pull this queen for a nuc, would you let the hive rear their own queen? My other option is to take the queen from the split (from this same hive ) and do a combine.

    Or since these bees are aggressive, would I just be feeding the cycle by continuing this line of genetics and passing it to my other hives?

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Apr 2003
    Location
    Greenville, TX, USA
    Posts
    4,341

    Default

    Many times a daughter will be calmer than the mother. Give it a try. You can always re-queen then if you want. Sounds like good genetics other than the attitude.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    Santa Rosa, California
    Posts
    86

    Default I would keep the genetics, its local and doing well

    Benton,
    I think I would keep this Queen's genetics because of what you said

    >The queen is also laying like crazy. <

    This is a trate that may make you more honey/money... I would raise a "New Queen" from her brood and see what her gene pool is like... If the new Queen is good then she could be used to better your operation...
    Lee...

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Willington, CT USA
    Posts
    414

    Default

    Size and activity wise this is my best hive - other than the BA. I might even deal with it until after the first nectar flow in order to see how they do.

    This is all good advice - thank you.

  11. #11
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Murfreesboro, TN, USA
    Posts
    575

    Default

    Benton,
    I agree with the others who suggest you pinch the old queen and let your good hive raise their own new one. Just my humble opinion. Good luck and let us know what you decide.
    "My child, eat honey, for it is good." (Proverbs 24:13)

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Willington, CT USA
    Posts
    414

    Default timing

    We are on the edge of a nectar flow - any time now (weather permitting).

    How important is the timing of "removing" the queen? My thought is to remove her and let them rear their own. I read that doing this before a flow is actually good since more bees are out gathering nectar versus tending to the young and household duty.

    Beleive me i have been wrong before....all opinions are welcome.

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    45,481

    Default

    The rule of thumb for purposeful queenlessness is to remove her one to two weeks before the flow. Right at the flow works ok, but not quite as well, especially with a short flow. Basically you want them without any open brood when the flow starts.
    Michael Bush bushfarms.com/bees.htm "Everything works if you let it." ThePracticalBeekeeper.com 40y 200h 37yTF

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