Results 1 to 20 of 20
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Location
    colo springs,CO,U.S.A.
    Posts
    57

    Default re-liquifying honey

    does anyone use a microwave oven to re-liquify their honey?
    practice random acts of kindness; for emily

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    College Station, Texas
    Posts
    6,973

    Default

    yes...

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    Owen, WI, USA
    Posts
    2,550

    Default

    yes...

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Location
    johnstown N.Y.
    Posts
    131

    Default honey warmer

    If it is already in jars put it in the oven on warn setting. It will be lquid in a cuple hours Dan

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    Anchorage, Alaska
    Posts
    1,649

    Default

    yes...

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Location
    Grifton, NC
    Posts
    1,302

    Default

    You just want to use a low power setting and don't let it boil or scorch. I nuke my plastic dispenser bottle if it cyrstallizes. The microwave will melt a plastic honey dispenser(don't ask...)
    Banjos and bees... how sweet it is!

  7. #7
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    Raleigh, North Carolina
    Posts
    3,598

    Default

    dashboard of the truck on a hot day with the windows rolled up
    I'm cheap

    Dave

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Location
    colo springs,CO,U.S.A.
    Posts
    57

    Default do we try to sell our honey as having good nutrients?

    do we also tell our customers that our honey is better than buying it at the store because the enzymes that are there provide a good immune booster? If so we really need to delve into this subject deeper. I have always been told that if you use a microwave oven to re-liquify your honey that you are destroying the good nutrient in it after some research i found this site.
    http://www.newton.dep.anl.gov/askasc...1/gen01565.htm
    try to find out more and post it here please
    practice random acts of kindness; for emily

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Location
    Buda, Texas
    Posts
    922

    Default

    yes . . . but . . .
    "I am the Good Shepherd. The Good Shepherd lays down His life for the sheep. " John 10:11

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Fuquay Varina, NC
    Posts
    261

    Default

    I use a seedling mat inside a Styrofoam cooler for 12 hours. works well for a couple dozen bottles and gradually reliquifies granulated honey.
    Hughes Honey Apiary
    http://www.hugheshoney.com

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    Brown County, IN
    Posts
    2,025

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by drobbins View Post
    dashboard of the truck on a hot day with the windows rolled up
    I'm cheap

    Dave
    Another vote for the dashboard!

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Apr 2003
    Location
    Greenville, TX, USA
    Posts
    4,204

    Default

    A case of bottles in the trunk works too

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    Standish, Maine USA
    Posts
    57

    Default

    Yes, on a small scale. A bottle at a time. I try not to over do it, but it's easier and faster then putting it in hot water.

    Larry

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    Worthington, Pennsylvania USA
    Posts
    1,848

    Smile

    Sixty watt bulb in old stripped out refrigerator works great for jars, supers, five gallon buckets.
    "Younz" have a great day, I will.

  15. #15
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    Battle Ground , Washington, USA
    Posts
    704

    Default

    We had this come up a couple months ago, a thread to ask a scientist.com.
    If I remember right, they tested heating and anything above 100 degrees can change the taste and over 120 starts to kills enzymes. It stated heat is heat, if you micro do it on defrost and dont let it get hot spots.

    Told my wife to heat it for 1 minute, she didnt put it on defrost, it was a plastic blob.

    Like others, I'll do a jar at a time for my own use but use a slow, light bulb type approch for selling honey.
    I'm not tense, Just terribly, terribly alert!

  16. #16
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Location
    Wheatfield, IN
    Posts
    2,069

    Default

    you betcha
    Dan Williamson
    B&C Honey Farm http://www.flickr.com/photos/9848229@N05/

  17. #17
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    Owen, WI, USA
    Posts
    2,550

    Default

    It doesn't help that the National Honey Board has incomplete/misleading directions such as this in their "honey handling tips" section. On high microwave settings, honey can overheat within 30 seconds.

    http://www.honey.com/consumers/honeyinfo/tips.asp
    "If your honey crystallizes, simply place the honey jar in warm water and stir until the crystals dissolve. Or, place the honey in a microwave-safe container with the lid off and microwave it, stirring every 30 seconds, until the crystals dissolve. Be careful not to boil or scorch the honey." (my emphasis)

    The instructions should recommend a low power setting.
    I tell my customers to use defrost for 30 seconds at a time.
    Sheri

  18. #18
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    Lancaster CA
    Posts
    410

    Default Bottle black sage it doesn't crystalize

    I saved a bucket of orange for an englishman that liked crystalized honey. It was nicly crystalized when I gave it to him. He put it in the cab of his truck and then went to the beach for the day. The next day he calls to complains that the honey was liquid.

  19. #19
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    Anchorage, Alaska
    Posts
    1,649

    Default

    Good point Sheri. Microwaving a plastic bottle of crystallized honey for 30 seconds on high power will only partially reliquify it. Some of it can still remain solid while the stuff at the top will be thin liquid, and boiling. The plastic will become soft and deform where it is in contact with the boiling honey. Ask me how I know.....

    Low power and stirring is the key.

  20. #20
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Tompkins County, New York
    Posts
    118

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by beegee View Post
    You just want to use a low power setting and don't let it boil or scorch. I nuke my plastic dispenser bottle if it cyrstallizes. The microwave will melt a plastic honey dispenser(don't ask...)
    My husband melted a bottle of honey in the microwave at work. Ouch.
    My beekeeping blog: The Bee Yard

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
Ads