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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Albuquerque, New Mexico
    Posts
    137

    Default What to do with 8 queen cells?

    I did a walk away split last Saturday taking a deep that had four frames of brood (two open and two capped) and the rest were being filled with nectar. I checked them this Wednesday and they have started 8 queen cells.

    I am correct in thinking that if I let nature run its course I will have some swarms issue with that many queens emerging? The cells are started mid frame on Pierco foundation so I don't know how to cut a few out. Four of the cells are all in a row 'fused' together. Any thoughts on how I could remove some of these cells? Thanks

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Indian Valley, Virginia
    Posts
    587

    Default

    the first queen out will dispatch the rest.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Albuquerque, New Mexico
    Posts
    137

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by randydrivesabus View Post
    the first queen out will dispatch the rest.
    I thought I read that sometimes she can miss one and then a swarm may occur?

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Location
    Arundel, Maine USA
    Posts
    1,207

    Default

    I'm pretty new at this, but usually nucs won't really send off swarms will they? How many bees you got in that nuc? I thought nucs were small, and didn't have enough bees to swarm...
    Let's BEE friends

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Albuquerque, New Mexico
    Posts
    137

    Default

    It's a ten frame deep with enough bees to fill 8/10 frames with the other two starting to be worked.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Location
    Lee\'s Summit, MO
    Posts
    1,300

    Default

    I wouldn't be worried about a swarm. They are just trying to make sure they have a queen. randydrivesabus is right, the first to hatch will dispatch the others. If that queen misses one the two will smell each other upon the second one's hatching and a fight to determine which one survives will ensue.
    Ninja, is not in the dictionary. Well played Ninja's, well played...

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    Kiel WI, USA
    Posts
    2,368

    Default

    If the cells are on separate frames and capped, I would strongly consider splitting it in half so you get two virgins in case of mating problems. Re-combine when you know which queen you want to keep.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
    Posts
    276

    Default

    What kind of bees are these? If they are Russian bees ... they are known for having queen cells present most of the time. It`s normal for them and not necessarily a sign of swarming.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Albuquerque, New Mexico
    Posts
    137

    Default

    They started as Italians and have been open mated for several years. A local beek has brought in Russians for a long time to this whole area so they may have some |Russian but are still very yellow. Never new Russians keep queen cells around all the time.

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