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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    Lancaster, PA, USA
    Posts
    13

    Default Toxic smoker fuel?

    Ideally I would bailer twine however I've run out. I would like to use some cedar chips for smoker fuel. This is the kind used for small animal bedding. Is cedar smoke toxic at all? I heard someone say it was once... Thanks.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Troupsburg, NY
    Posts
    4,072

    Default

    It would only be toxic if there was some chemical added to the bedding. Baler twine on the other hand is...they add ronticide to it to keep the mice from chewing on the strings...you would need to let it weather some before you use it. I use wood pellets, they start hard, but once lit they last along time. Whatever you do, don't use Chinesee cardboard, the smoke will make you sick.
    "I reject your reality, and substitute my own." Adam Savage

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Pepperell, MA.
    Posts
    3,772

    Default

    I can't get cedar chips around here anymore....just non-cedar wood shavings, but I used to use cedar chips in the smoker all the time. Wish I could still get them.
    "My wife always wanted girls. Just not thousands and thousands of them......"

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Western N.C
    Posts
    53

    Default

    Hi Peggjam!
    What is Chinesee cardboard? I guess I am like everyone else and use what is available..for free. I am a parts clerk and have plenty of free cardboard boxs. It works real well for me and I have never heard of this. Don't tell me it's full of lead too!
    Worried
    Beewhisper

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    Brasher Falls, NY, USA
    Posts
    28,068

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by beewhisper
    Beewhisper
    Er, Beewhisper,

    Did you forget an E and an R? Were you going for Beewhisperer, like the Horsewhisperer? Or something else? What does a whispering bee sound like?

    No offense intended. Just curious.
    Mark Berninghausen
    Squeak Creek Apiaries



  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Location
    Oxford, Kansas
    Posts
    1,988

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by BigB View Post
    Ideally I would bailer twine however I've run out. I would like to use some cedar chips for smoker fuel. This is the kind used for small animal bedding. Is cedar smoke toxic at all? I heard someone say it was once... Thanks.
    I use cedar chips all the time with no problems

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    red lion, pa usa
    Posts
    38

    Default

    there used to be an article that i read that stated cedar chips would help knock off mites, and so in florida i would use cedar chips in the smoker and dust with powdered sugar, not sure if it worked but i never had a mite problem.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Location
    Batesburg-Leesville, South Carolina
    Posts
    1,443

    Smile

    Quote Originally Posted by sqkcrk View Post
    Er, Beewhisper,

    Did you forget an E and an R? Were you going for Beewhisperer, like the Horsewhisperer? Or something else? What does a whispering bee sound like?

    No offense intended. Just curious.

    man you are full of questions aren't you?
    S ome
    Q uestions
    K eep
    C oming,
    R ight
    K iddo?

    and no, I drive a HONDA!

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Troupsburg, NY
    Posts
    4,072

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by beewhisper View Post
    Hi Peggjam!
    What is Chinesee cardboard? I guess I am like everyone else and use what is available..for free. I am a parts clerk and have plenty of free cardboard boxs. It works real well for me and I have never heard of this. Don't tell me it's full of lead too!
    Worried
    Beewhisper
    It's that really cheap cardboard that everyone seems to use now, has kinda a greenish tint to it. A friend was using it in his smoker an I got downwind from him, and was breathing that stuff for a few hours, I didn't feel so great for the rest of the week.
    "I reject your reality, and substitute my own." Adam Savage

  10. #10
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Lincoln,Nebraska,USA
    Posts
    204

    Default

    Go to a farm supply place and buy the horse bedding that looks like wood pellets because that is what it is just make sure its natural it is cheap and works well.

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    Southern Oregon
    Posts
    1,165

    Default

    I have successfully used pine, alder, incense cedar, and Juniper chips and shavings. Basically whatever is available, my favorite is pine needles and then free burlap. Dried horse dung will do in an emergency, but I would not stop for an after work libation should that emergency arise...very stinky, but burned great and saved the day.
    John B Jacob www.oldsolbees.com

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    Hanover, MA, USA
    Posts
    49

    Default

    Pine needles are awsome for thick cool smoke but don't last long. Burlap is my first choice and then I often throw a handful of pine needles in just before I start working them.

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Western N.C
    Posts
    53

    Default

    Hi Peggjam!
    Thanks for the info.I believe the boxs I use are ok. They arn't green. I use card board, burlap, and poplar wood chips. I get it all at work.
    What is a SQKCRK ?

    Be One With The Bee
    The Beewhisper

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    Brown County, IN
    Posts
    2,034

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by peggjam View Post
    Baler twine on the other hand is...they add ronticide to it to keep the mice from chewing on the strings...you would need to let it weather some before you use it.
    Baler twine that is chemically treated is dyed; usually green or orange. If you have the plain twine, you're good to go.

  15. #15
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    Brazill, Indiana, U.S.
    Posts
    98

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by indypartridge View Post
    Baler twine that is chemically treated is dyed; usually green or orange. If you have the plain twine, you're good to go.
    Not true, nearly all sisal baler twine sold today is treated whether it is dyed or not. Look at the packaging, it should say, but it may not. If has a slightly oily residue don't risk it, it's likely treated. I would look for gardening twine in the garden department of a store, it is less likely to be treated.

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