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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    torrington,ct, usa
    Posts
    20

    Default pierco foundation color

    How important is the pierco foundation color?

    Do the bees really care, particularly if the foundation is new and has to be drawn out?
    backerbees

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    Fairfield, Connecticut
    Posts
    597

    Default

    I would think black brood foundation is easier to see laid eggs in. do they care? They will work with what you give them.
    If it isn't broken, don't try to fix it. If you build it, they will fill it.

  3. #3

    Default

    I agree Grimbee, Color doesn't matter to the bees, BUT it is a lot easier to see eggs and such on black. I have used strictly black for years. Oh, and a fresh capped frame of honey on black foundation looks Ohhhh so pretty!
    If you see me runnin' you'd better keep up!
    http://hillshivery.blogspot.com/

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    Moravian Falls, NC
    Posts
    67

    Default

    My experience has been that the bees will work black before the white. A customer didn't believe there was a difference so as a test he put 5 white and 5 black in 10 colonies. We then installed packages on the new frames. After 2 weeks they were working the all the black but hadn't touched the white in all the colonies. I don't know why.

    Cheers,
    Shane

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    GASTON SOUTH CAROLINA USA
    Posts
    8

    Smile

    I use the black (pierco) for the deep and the white for the shallow super. I like the pierco but i had a problem with burr comb but i solved the problem this year by appling more wax on the frames with a paint roller and a crock pot to keep it warm enough to apply. I also spray each frame with a solution of HBH and sugar solution(1/1). the only thing that i dont like about the pierco frames are all the void spaces that are around the frames hive beetles love to hide in these voids but if the hive is strong they can handle them somewhat.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Location
    Wheatfield, IN
    Posts
    2,068

    Default

    Frankly I tend to agree with Shane..... I haven't done any scientific tests... but when installing black next to white in several colonies... it appeared that nearly everytime the black was drawn out more quickly.... I don't know why... it just seemed that was the way it worked out.

    That said... they do draw out white pierco very well... so don't put a ton of stock into color for speed of drawning frames. It has more to do with seeing eggs in my opinion.
    Dan Williamson
    B&C Honey Farm http://www.flickr.com/photos/9848229@N05/

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    Lake county, Indiana 46408-4109
    Posts
    3,540

    Default

    THINK ABOUT THIS

    It is a lot easier to see wax on the black than white but it "seams" that they draw black first

    Just something to think about!
    Ed, KA9CTT profanity is IGNORANCE made audible
    you can`t fix stupid not even with duct tape

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    Devils Lake, North Dakota
    Posts
    9,123

    Default

    With my old eyes.......... Black is a no brainier. Eggs are easy
    to see.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Location
    Wheatfield, IN
    Posts
    2,068

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by honeyman46408 View Post
    THINK ABOUT THIS

    It is a lot easier to see wax on the black than white but it "seams" that they draw black first

    Just something to think about!
    I would agree that its easier to see the wax being drawn on black first. However, I was refering to the completed drawn out comb which is easy to distinguish.
    Dan Williamson
    B&C Honey Farm http://www.flickr.com/photos/9848229@N05/

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Location
    Perkasie, PA
    Posts
    1,998

    Default

    The only thing good about the white is that it allows the keeper to see where the pollen is located. Aside from that, I always prefer the black as is is easy to see the eggs and larvae. The bees don't seem to care.

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