Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 20 of 25
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Location
    Springfield New Jersey
    Posts
    119

    Default Excalibur hive tool

    Saw a new hive tool in one of the bee mags and was wondering if anyone knew of where to get one . The excalibur hive tool it is called.Checked most os the big suppliers with no luck.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jan 2001
    Location
    New York City
    Posts
    3,401

    Default

    They are still messing around with the tooling at the factory.

    It is amazingly difficult to make something out of tool steel, when
    one must use one type of tool steel to cut the other type of tool steel.

    Hang in there, we've got too many advance orders to not be
    pushing hard on this little project.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Location
    North Carolina
    Posts
    581

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Jim Fischer View Post
    They are still messing around with the tooling at the factory.

    It is amazingly difficult to make something out of tool steel, when
    one must use one type of tool steel to cut the other type of tool steel.

    Hang in there, we've got too many advance orders to not be
    pushing hard on this little project.
    How difficult would it be to make the hive tool out of stainless steel? The best hive tool that I have is a stainless hive tool from Bee Works.

    http://www.beeworks.com/catalog/inde...&products_id=9

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jan 2001
    Location
    New York City
    Posts
    3,401

    Default

    Excalibur is stainless steel.

    A very nice grade of stainless - less "soft" than the one sold by BeeWorks
    (who buy theirs from Thorne, who have them made in Red China).
    I can bend one of those with my bare hands, and likely so can you if
    you put your mind to it.

    Excalibur ain't gonna bend.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    45,408

    Default

    http://www.beeworks.com/catalog/inde...&products_id=8

    I like this one better. I had one, but I lost it. I like the Italian ones from Brushy Mt. the best.

    http://www.beeequipment.com/products.asp?pcode=591
    Michael Bush bushfarms.com/bees.htm "Everything works if you let it." ThePracticalBeekeeper.com 40y 200h 37yTF

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Location
    North Carolina
    Posts
    581

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Michael Bush View Post
    http://www.beeworks.com/catalog/inde...&products_id=8

    I like this one better. I had one, but I lost it. I like the Italian ones from Brushy Mt. the best.

    http://www.beeequipment.com/products.asp?pcode=591
    I like the Italian hive tool for separating the supers since the Italian hive tool is thinner than other hive tools. Howver, I do not use it for anything else. Do you use the Italian hive tool for all your manipulations? Please explain.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    45,408

    Default

    >Do you use the Italian hive tool for all your manipulations? Please explain.

    Yes. You have to learn how to use it effectively since it is different. You can use the flat end as you do any hive tool, except you get more leverage. You use the hook any of several ways. You can hook it under the end of the frames (and being a smaller hook it goes in much easier than the Maxant version) and then you can actually pry against the rabbet as the force is in a downward direction unlike a regular hive tool which will break out the rabbet. Or you can pry against the frame next to it, if you prefer. The hook is small enough to get into tight places.

    The one from beeworks is the Thorne version of the Maxant type. But it has a smaller hook (though not as small as the Italian) and it's stainless steel (unlike the Italian or the Maxant).
    Michael Bush bushfarms.com/bees.htm "Everything works if you let it." ThePracticalBeekeeper.com 40y 200h 37yTF

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Dec 1999
    Location
    DuPage County, Illinois USA
    Posts
    9,319

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Michael Bush View Post
    I agree Mike. I've had mine a long time. What it would take to bend it from use would be enormous, beyond any of my hive management practices.

    Although, mine is from Maxant and if I understand you correctly, it's not stainless but steel? Hard for me to imagine the need for stainless as mine always has a thin coating of wax from use so rust isn't an issue.
    Last edited by Barry; 04-20-2008 at 01:35 PM.
    Regards, Barry

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Location
    North Carolina
    Posts
    581

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Michael Bush View Post
    >Do you use the Italian hive tool for all your manipulations? Please explain.

    Yes. You have to learn how to use it effectively since it is different. You can use the flat end as you do any hive tool, except you get more leverage. You use the hook any of several ways. You can hook it under the end of the frames (and being a smaller hook it goes in much easier than the Maxant version) and then you can actually pry against the rabbet as the force is in a downward direction unlike a regular hive tool which will break out the rabbet. Or you can pry against the frame next to it, if you prefer. The hook is small enough to get into tight places.

    The one from beeworks is the Thorne version of the Maxant type. But it has a smaller hook (though not as small as the Italian) and it's stainless steel (unlike the Italian or the Maxant).
    Thanks for the information. I will start using my Italian hive tool more. The Italian hive tool and the stainless steel hive tools from Bee Works beat all of the other hive tools hands down!

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Location
    North Carolina
    Posts
    581

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Barry View Post
    I agree Mike. I've had mine a long time. What it would take to bend it from use would be enormous, beyond any of my hive management practices.

    Although, mine is from Maxant and if I understand you correctly, it's not stainless but steel? Hard for me to imagine the need for stainless as mine always has a thin coating of wax from use so rust isn't an issue.
    The stainless steel hive tool from Bee Works is thinner and a joy to use!

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Jan 2001
    Location
    New York City
    Posts
    3,401

    Default

    > mine always has a thin coating of wax from use so rust isn't an issue.

    Hey! You are supposed to clean your hive tool at least
    every so often, ya know!

    The idea behind stainless is that it will not rust, not pit, nor
    present a rough surface that would allow gunk to stick or stay in
    a nook or cranny. The other idea is that it can stand being autoclaved
    or tossed in dishwasher for sterilization.

    The "lifters" on the Maxant, the Bee Works (Thorne) and the
    very long "Italian" tools are just not small enough to get between
    frames and left them out of sticky propolis and/or bridge comb,
    hence the much smaller lifter end on Excalibur. But, to each his
    own.

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Dec 1999
    Location
    DuPage County, Illinois USA
    Posts
    9,319

    Default

    Interesting, I've never had any problems with the Maxant getting the hook between the frames and under the frame ends to lift them up.
    Regards, Barry

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Apr 2003
    Location
    Greenville, TX, USA
    Posts
    4,329

    Default

    Nor have I. I keep two of the Maxant tools in my bucket and like using them.

  14. #14
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Hays, Kansas, USA
    Posts
    1,080

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Jim Fischer View Post
    >
    The other idea is that it can stand being autoclaved or tossed in dishwasher for sterilization.
    The autoclave my wife got at WalMart broke, so now I just wipe it off real well.
    I haven't seen (only a catalog photo) or used the Italian hive tool, but it would have to be pretty special to replace my Maxant.

  15. #15
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    45,408

    Default

    >The "lifters" on the Maxant, the Bee Works (Thorne) and the
    very long "Italian" tools are just not small enough to get between
    frames and left them out of sticky propolis and/or bridge comb,
    hence the much smaller lifter end on Excalibur.

    I have trouble with the Maxant being too big, the Thorne is better, but still a bit too big, the Italian works fine for me. I am curious to see the Excalibur.

    >Interesting, I've never had any problems with the Maxant getting the hook between the frames and under the frame ends to lift them up.

    I have. I gave my Maxant ones away.
    Michael Bush bushfarms.com/bees.htm "Everything works if you let it." ThePracticalBeekeeper.com 40y 200h 37yTF

  16. #16
    Join Date
    Dec 1999
    Location
    DuPage County, Illinois USA
    Posts
    9,319

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Michael Bush View Post
    I gave my Maxant ones away.
    I wish you would have told me before doing that. I'd have made a case for you to give them to me.
    I could use another one.
    After all this talk about Maxant being too big on the lifter, I went and thinned mine down just a tad on the grinder. Now it slips in real easy!
    Regards, Barry

  17. #17
    Join Date
    Dec 1999
    Location
    DuPage County, Illinois USA
    Posts
    9,319

    Default

    This talk about Maxant's hive tool has peaked my interest. I couldn't relate to those saying their tool is not "as thin". I went back and looked closely to the image on Bee Works website and realized that mine has a much finer (thinner) edge. Oh yea, now I remember customizing it on my grinder, shortly after I got it. I do this to all my flat bars as I find them to be too thick and blunt on the edges.
    Regards, Barry

  18. #18
    Join Date
    Oct 2003
    Location
    Jenison, MI
    Posts
    1,514

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Barry View Post
    This talk about Maxant's hive tool has peaked my interest. I couldn't relate to those saying their tool is not "as thin". I went back and looked closely to the image on Bee Works website and realized that mine has a much finer (thinner) edge. Oh yea, now I remember customizing it on my grinder, shortly after I got it. I do this to all my flat bars as I find them to be too thick and blunt on the edges.
    That is why I use both the Maxant and a standard hive tool when inspecting. I don't have a grinder.

  19. #19
    Join Date
    Apr 2003
    Location
    Greenville, TX, USA
    Posts
    4,329

    Default

    Where exactly are you grinding? Mine came with a sharp end that makes it easy to separate frames, then the hook has plenty of room.

  20. #20
    Join Date
    Dec 1999
    Location
    DuPage County, Illinois USA
    Posts
    9,319

    Default

    The Maxant tool has an "edge" on two sides of the end. On both of these edges, I made the angle more gradual by grinding further back towards the middle.

    http://www.beesource.com/imgs/tooledge.jpg

    The bottom figure is how mine looks. It is very sharp.
    Regards, Barry

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
Ads