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  1. #1
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    Lawrenceville, Ga.
    Posts
    13

    Smile Honey plants you have planted and their results

    Hello everyone,

    I have always thought that planting some acreage with honey plants such as the many that are named in the book "American Honey Plants" would be not only benificial but profitable also. Plants such as the various clovers, anise hyssop, sourwood trees, gallberry, blackberry, etc, etc.

    If anyone has done this would you mind informing us about:

    1) What you planted?
    2) Amount of acreage planted?
    3) What area (Location) did you do this in?
    4) What was the bloom date and duration of blooming and nector flow for your planting?
    5) What results did you obtain? (Gallons, lbs, none obtained, etc)
    6) Was there another source that interffered in production of your planting?
    7) What would you say is the max amount of colonies your planting would support?
    8) Additional comments you want to make?

    Maybe your input might help some of us increase our production or just learn something from all the beekeepers of the world.

    Thanks for your time,

    HoneySeeker

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    Cameron, MO
    Posts
    586

    Default I'm trying it this year

    Hi I am trying to plant for bee's this year also. In the past years my fruit tree's and garden didn't seem to perform very well and I didnt see many honey bee's. So I bought a hive(just about to start a nuc) and have planted 1acre of white clover, I have 2-3 acres of buckwheat, and have over 30 fruit tree's along with my flower and veggie garden so far. I plan on getting out more clovers but not red since I read the honey bee's can't pollinate it easily. Also will try some alfalfa and ???. I got my info from Missouri Conservationist. There are other types of plants to use but these will fare well in the hay later on and add on that cash crop! I am sourounded by over 1000 acres of open ground(native grasses mostly, with fescue also) w/ maybe 4-5 farm homes in the vicinity of me in Northwest Missouri. I have 15 acres ready to plant but need some dry weather to get it done. I'll let you know later this year how it faired!!! Any ideas on what to plant on that 15 would be greatful!
    Good luck!

  3. #3
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    Lawrenceville, Ga.
    Posts
    13

    Default Honey Plants

    Quote Originally Posted by Zane View Post
    Hi I am trying to plant for bee's this year also. In the past years my fruit tree's and garden didn't seem to perform very well and I didnt see many honey bee's. So I bought a hive(just about to start a nuc) and have planted 1acre of white clover, I have 2-3 acres of buckwheat, and have over 30 fruit tree's along with my flower and veggie garden so far. I plan on getting out more clovers but not red since I read the honey bee's can't pollinate it easily. Also will try some alfalfa and ???. I got my info from Missouri Conservationist. There are other types of plants to use but these will fare well in the hay later on and add on that cash crop! I am sourounded by over 1000 acres of open ground(native grasses mostly, with fescue also) w/ maybe 4-5 farm homes in the vicinity of me in Northwest Missouri. I have 15 acres ready to plant but need some dry weather to get it done. I'll let you know later this year how it faired!!! Any ideas on what to plant on that 15 would be greatful!
    Good luck!
    Zane,

    I have read good things about both sweet clover and according to the "American Honey Plants" book anise hyssop supposely will support 100 hives on one acre with a average yield of 100 lbs per hive. I have grown 15 or 20 of these plants around the house and most times find that wasps, bumble bees and all manner of flying stinging insect will work them from morning to late in the evening. But my honeybees seen to work them to some degree and I think they are actually mainly working clover or other things instead of the anise hyssop. But I want to plant several acres at sometime to get a true test.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    eastern Hanover, Virginia
    Posts
    361

    Default anise hyssop

    i didnt really notice wasps and things on mine, but the honey bees were all over it all the time.
    -M@

  5. #5
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    eastern Hanover, Virginia
    Posts
    361

    Default 100 hives

    --"...according to the "American Honey Plants" book anise hyssop supposely will support 100 hives on one acre with a average yield of 100 lbs per hive..."

    could that be true? seems excessively high, not that i would mind if it works !!
    -M@

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Burlington NC
    Posts
    125

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by newbeematt View Post
    --"...according to the "American Honey Plants" book anise hyssop supposely will support 100 hives on one acre with a average yield of 100 lbs per hive..."

    could that be true? seems excessively high, not that i would mind if it works !!
    Thats 10,000 lbs of honey from 1 acre. Wow, someone has a wild imagination.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Darrington, WA, USA
    Posts
    544

    Default

    When is the best time to throw some clover seed? Do you have to worry about frost? I was thinking of throwing some white clover in my pield.

    JoeMcc
    "Slow Down and Taste the Vanilla" - My Grandma

  8. #8
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    Lawrenceville, Ga.
    Posts
    13

    Default Honey Plants For Honey production

    Quote Originally Posted by newbeematt View Post
    i didnt really notice wasps and things on mine, but the honey bees were all over it all the time.
    Do you happen to know which anise hyysop (Blue Fortune, white, pink or gaint) you had planted? Do you happen to know what yield you got?

  9. #9

    Default

    November thru March is the best time to plant any clover. No frost is not a concern. The frost will work the seed down to just about the right depth, soil just covering the seed. Has anyone had any luck with alsike clover for a honey plant?

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    Dresden ,Tn 38225
    Posts
    109

    Default

    I usually plant crimson clover for deer food plots and for the bees.Last year I had as much as 10 acres but the late freeze nailed it as it was just starting to bloom good.It did come back out and bloomed some.The bees really work it and I like the flavor of the honey.It will usually have a two to three week period of blooming.I can't give any figures for yields.It usually comes into bloom here in west Tn after some of the early trees and before the poplar and blackberry.It is an annual,but will reseed itself if you let the seed mature and then mow later.It is also a good soil builder when turned under as a green crop.

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Limestone, Alabama
    Posts
    577

    Default Honey Plants

    I have planted the following plants, both annual and perennial: Clovers, Vetch,
    Anise Hyssop, Vitex Negundo, Catnip, Mountain Mint, Buckwheat, Marigolds, Thistle, Tulip Poplar, Sourwood, Southern Catalpa, Gallberry, Pussy Willow, Willow, Red Maple, Evodia, Peach, Apple, Plum, Cherry, Pear and Butterfly Bush and Pieris Japonica. Probably a few others I forgot to mention. All the above plants are good sources for bees at various times of the spring and summer.

    I live on 20 acres and my family owns another adjoining 20 acres, so there is ample room to plant things. I also give seeds or seedlings to neighbors who will plant them. This benefits my own bees as well as feral colonies and native bee species. If we all did this, the country's bees would be much better off!

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    Cameron, MO
    Posts
    586

    Default Anise Hysop

    I planted some Anise Hysop bush's right next to my deck steps last year. I like the smell when you brush into them. They might be a little close for my liitle friends!! I wont bite and hope they wont!lol
    What is "sourwood"? I have room for it if it would grow here?

  13. #13
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    Lawrenceville, Ga.
    Posts
    13

    Default Honey Plants

    Quote Originally Posted by Zane View Post
    I planted some Anise Hysop bush's right next to my deck steps last year. I like the smell when you brush into them. They might be a little close for my liitle friends!! I wont bite and hope they wont!lol
    What is "sourwood"? I have room for it if it would grow here?
    Hey Zane,

    Sourwood is a tree that grows throughtout the eastern part of the country. Other names are Sorrel tree or Oxydendrum arboreum. I planted 8 of them last lear and so far only one has budded out and I am hopeful that the others will bud out in the next few weeks. I think it is also called Lily of the valley tree because the blooms are like the Lily of the valley plant.

    The description i found was:
    It is native to eastern North America, from southern Pennsylvania south to northwest Florida and west to southern Illinois; it is most common in the lower chain of the Appalachian Mountains.

    Sourwood is a small tree or large shrub, growing to 10-20 m tall with a trunk up to 50 cm diameter. The leaves are spirally arranged, deciduous, 8-20 cm long and 4-9 cm broad, with a finely serrated margin; they are dark green in summer but turn vivid red in fall. The flowers are white, bell-shaped, 6-9 mm long, produced on 15-25 cm long panicles. The fruit is a small woody capsule. The roots are shallow, and the tree grows best when there is little root competition; it also requires acidic soils for successful growth. The leaves can be chewed (but should not be swallowed) to help alleviate a dry feeling mouth. As the name of the tree implies, the effect is similar to chewing a sour piece of gum. (1 Meter = 3.28084 Feet)

    I have also put out some "Chaste Trees" (Vitex agnus-castus) which have a rather amusing history which is suppost to be a good honey plant. about 15 ft tall and can be trained as a tree or bush and is sometimes called the poor man's lilac. I found a very hard to get one called "Salina Pink" and the bees work them nicely. The aromatic leaves are palmate, with five to seven leaflets and are sometimes mistaken for marijuana so don't be surprised by neighbors interest.

  14. #14
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    Lawrenceville, Ga.
    Posts
    13

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by BeeAware View Post
    I have planted the following plants, both annual and perennial: Clovers, Vetch,
    Anise Hyssop, Vitex Negundo, Catnip, Mountain Mint, Buckwheat, Marigolds, Thistle, Tulip Poplar, Sourwood, Southern Catalpa, Gallberry, Pussy Willow, Willow, Red Maple, Evodia, Peach, Apple, Plum, Cherry, Pear and Butterfly Bush and Pieris Japonica. Probably a few others I forgot to mention. All the above plants are good sources for bees at various times of the spring and summer.

    I live on 20 acres and my family owns another adjoining 20 acres, so there is ample room to plant things. I also give seeds or seedlings to neighbors who will plant them. This benefits my own bees as well as feral colonies and native bee species. If we all did this, the country's bees would be much better off!
    So BeeAware out of the list what has proven to be the best honey producer for you. I would like to hear about all the different ones you listed but the top two I would like to hear about are the Sourwood and the Gallberry. How many Souirwoods did you plant and how many Gallberry bushes did you plant. What part of the country are you located in?

  15. #15
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Location
    Prince Albert, Saskatchewan, Canada
    Posts
    46

    Default flowers

    Hey,

    I got a couple of lbs of butterfly/hummingbird wild flower seed from http://www.americanmeadows.com

    Good price too I thought. It contains

    baby snapdragon, baby's breath, black eyed susan, chinese forget me not, crimson clover, dame's rocket, lemon mint, morning glory, nasturtium, none so pretty, purple coneflower, red poppy, rose mallow, scarlet sage, wild annual lupine, and wild cosmos.

    Looking forward to seeing how it grows.

    cheers

    peter

  16. #16
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    YANCEY CO., NC
    Posts
    639

    Default Re: Honey plants you have planted and their results

    Well how did it go?

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