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  1. #21
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    Worcester County, Massachusetts
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    3,571

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    mmm, i think i said that i perfer the ras for "almost everything". i don't use it for ripping...but almost everything else is easier and safer (assuming the ras is properly aligned, and not a cheap sheet metal job).

    i have a 10" delta/rockwell turret head ras from the 60's that i bought in very good condition for $100...it has pretty good stops for 90 and 45 degree angle cuts, so i'm not shy about moving things around.

    ras get a bad rap because of the cheap ones...get a good one and you won't look back.

    deknow

  2. #22
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    Columbia, South Carolina USA
    Posts
    2,598

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    Quote Originally Posted by Barry View Post
    Keith, I thought you already bought yourself a saw. If not, I'd still push you to buy a used Delta/Rockwell.
    I didn't, some other things came up and got in the way. I still have a folder on my desktop with copies of our conversation because you gave me a ton of information. I have been checking out Craig's list in my immediate area for used Delta/Rockwell but so far what I've seen his other been in very poor shape or seems to get on the list and off the list in about three seconds. I get the impression that Craig's list is one of those things you have to check often they just be prepared to pull the trigger on.

    I still t have a storage issue though (hence my lusting over the Bosch unit - it folds up), but I've been suggesting to my lovely bride that a halfway decent table saw might just be the ticket to help me build a shed ... and therefore have increased storage... and I trashed my shoulder, so my grand plans of building a shed this winter for out the window. It seems like to get a solid a small footprint that is a really nice job you pay through the nose, and if you pay that kind of money you might as well get a really nice saw and find some other way to satisfy your storage issues etc. etc.

    Keith
    Last edited by Keith Benson; 03-25-2008 at 02:58 PM.
    Bee Sting Honey - So Good, It Hurts!

  3. #23
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Lincoln,Nebraska,USA
    Posts
    204

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    I have the ryobi like MB and just like him I wish the fence was a little longer but it has been a very sound saw and was needed very badly when bought and it served me very well and still does but if i had the cash I would buy a saw with a much longer fence and set the ryobi up for a single cut so to make things a little more streamed lined. It's been a good saw so why get rid of it. I also have a ryobi router and router table and it's just as reliable.

  4. #24
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    Alamo, TN (God's Country)
    Posts
    14

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    Just go ahead and buy the 80-99 dollar el-cheapo, you'll probably find that it is not enjoyable to operate, but it will get the job done. Also you won't have so much invested that you feel guilty when you upgrade down the road. In the meantime, if you're like me it will give you something to blame your sloppy craftsmanship on.

  5. #25
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    Reno, NV USA
    Posts
    2,310

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    Quote Originally Posted by Keith Benson View Post
    I didn't, some other things came up and got in the way. I still have a folder on my desktop with copies of our conversation because you gave me a ton of information. I have been checking out Craig's list in my immediate area for used Delta/Rockwell but so far what I've seen his other been in very poor shape or seems to get on the list and off the list in about three seconds. I get the impression that Craig's list is one of those things you have to check often they just be prepared to pull the trigger on.

    I still t have a storage issue though (hence my lusting over the Bosch unit - it folds up), but I've been suggesting to my lovely bride that a halfway decent table saw might just be the ticket to help me build a shed ... and therefore have increased storage... and I trashed my shoulder, so my grand plans of building a shed this winter for out the window. It seems like to get a solid a small footprint that is a really nice job you pay through the nose, and if you pay that kind of money you might as well get a really nice saw and find some other way to satisfy your storage issues etc. etc.

    Keith
    Keith,

    If I were in the market for a used saw I would be very happy to find one of the older Delta/Rockwells but I wouldn't limit my search to that saw. Some of the older Delta Unisaws, Powermatic#66, and Generals would do nicely. I'm sure others could add to the list to make the search even more exhaustive. The newer asian machines are expensive and the castings are thinner. If I were inexperienced and accident prone I might consider a SawStop table saws http://www.sawstop.com/. I have a Powermatic#66 and think it was one of the better saws made. If I ever get another crack at it I will look for an old Oliver 14/16" double arbor table saw, but I recognize a dream when I hear one.

  6. #26
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    Atlanta, GA
    Posts
    174

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    I'm waiting and saving up for SawStop to come out with the contractor model seen here>>> http://sawstop.com/products-contractor-saw.htm

    It will cost around $1,500 but it has a built in safety feature that makes it all but impossible to get severly hurt. That's just what my klutzy butt needs.

  7. #27
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    Reno, NV USA
    Posts
    2,310

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    Quote Originally Posted by Scut Farkas View Post
    I'm waiting and saving up for SawStop to come out with the contractor model seen here>>> http://sawstop.com/products-contractor-saw.htm

    It will cost around $1,500 but it has a built in safety feature that makes it all but impossible to get severly hurt. That's just what my klutzy butt needs.
    Just out of curiosity, why a contractor saw instead of the cabinet saw? For a few hundred bucks more you could get the heavier saw.

  8. #28
    Join Date
    Apr 2003
    Location
    Greenville, TX, USA
    Posts
    4,361

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    The difference is usually more than double, and contractor saws are usually more plentiful. Some guys wait a long time to pick up a PM66 (like mine). The difference in $350 or so and $800 and up is a chunk of change to many people.

  9. #29
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    Reno, NV USA
    Posts
    2,310

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    Quote Originally Posted by Ross View Post
    The difference is usually more than double, and contractor saws are usually more plentiful. Some guys wait a long time to pick up a PM66 (like mine). The difference in $350 or so and $800 and up is a chunk of change to many people.
    I think I have a serious tool fetish. I fall asleep during chick flicks, but got teary eyed when I heard that Powermatic became Jet, and PorterCable became B&D. We haven't had real solid tooling for years. When the 4.5X26 worm drive belt sanders were discontinued many years ago I thought, what a loss. Now the 3X24 locomotive is gone. You can't buy a router anymore that isn't plastic, and most of the larger shop equipment has lost some weight. I've used lighter contractor saws and just didn't enjoy the experience. I have the PM66 also and love the extra mass (should have bought the 12" or 14"). Since I had wood shop every year from 6th grade forward and then worked in commercial shops until I got out of college, I was used to the bigger machines. I am so grateful that I put most of my shop together before everything went to China. Even then, my tools don't have the heft that the old Olivers had in the early half of the 20th century. I just think it is sad that my son will never be able to purchase really good tools. Maybe I should watch my back next time I go backpacking with him.

  10. #30
    Join Date
    Apr 2003
    Location
    Greenville, TX, USA
    Posts
    4,361

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    You need to come play in my shop. 16" Northfield jointer (1830#), 18" Delta wedgebed planer (1200#), Crescent 32" bandsaw (1600#), an older Crescent 32" (1000#), Delta 20" bandsaw, PM66, PM60, PM10 mortiser, PM30 sander, PM45, PM90, PM141, Delta 17" drill press, (2) Delta HD shapers with feeders, etc, etc. And a South Bend 13" metal lathe to keep them all running. I'm looking for a mill. I'm a real tool junkie. I have several hundred handplanes, a dozen Emmert vises, timber frame boring machines, 16" Makita circular saw, Makita chain mortiser, 14" and (2) 12" Delta radial arm saws. Oh yea, this is a hobby.

  11. #31
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    Reno, NV USA
    Posts
    2,310

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    Now we're talking. Sounds like my kind of candy store. If I ever get some money (probably won't) I would like to buy a good inverter so I can get some of the larger 3-phase toys. Having two teenagers and a stay at home wife, my wallet will probably stay downsized for many years to come. Between the bees and my real job, I don't have time to work on older tools and don't have the money for newer ones. At least Vaseline is cheap.
    Last edited by HVH; 03-31-2008 at 06:35 PM.

  12. #32
    Join Date
    Apr 2003
    Location
    Greenville, TX, USA
    Posts
    4,361

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    I put in a 10 HP rotary converter a few years ago and love it.

  13. #33
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    Reno, NV USA
    Posts
    2,310

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    Quote Originally Posted by Ross View Post
    I put in a 10 HP rotary converter a few years ago and love it.
    With all the big boys you own, I am a bit surprised that you responded to the router post with a 1.5 hp model for a router table. I have a PM27 shaper and 1hp power feed, but I still prefer a big router in my table so I can purchase 1/2" shank router bits instead of shaper cutters. If you use a lot of insert tooling and grind your own knives, I can certainly understand where your router doesn't get much use, but for me, shaper knives are way too expensive for my budget unless they will get used a lot (i.e. cope and stick cutters and raised panel cutters). The reason I would like the three phase equipment is really for the same reason. It is not so much that I like big manly tools (OK - so I do) but rather, I like the clean cuts that they make without all the chatter and vibration. Small table saws like to move when you place a heavy board on them, then they feel like toys when you run your stock through them. Most of the three phase 7.5-hp or better tools stay put and don't fight you every step of the way. You can really appreciate the difference in tools that really need the juice, like a planer or TimeSaver. But, even the smaller shop tools, like routers seem to behave better with more mass.
    I'm sure I am preaching to the choir. I had to tell my wife about your shop just so she knows how frugal I have been.

  14. #34
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Hillsboro, Wisconsin, USA
    Posts
    1,672

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    Quote Originally Posted by Ross View Post
    You need to come play in my shop. 16" Northfield jointer (1830#), 18" Delta wedgebed planer (1200#), Crescent 32" bandsaw (1600#), an older Crescent 32" (1000#), Delta 20" bandsaw, PM66, PM60, PM10 mortiser, PM30 sander, PM45, PM90, PM141, Delta 17" drill press, (2) Delta HD shapers with feeders, etc, etc. And a South Bend 13" metal lathe to keep them all running. I'm looking for a mill. I'm a real tool junkie. I have several hundred handplanes, a dozen Emmert vises, timber frame boring machines, 16" Makita circular saw, Makita chain mortiser, 14" and (2) 12" Delta radial arm saws. Oh yea, this is a hobby.
    Sounds like a most excellent shop. I'll bet you make some nice furniture - you must either teach woodworking or have some wealthy clients, right? Me, I have some tools that get me by - one of these days I hope to be able to get a wider jointer and a large bandsaw that will resaw without deflecting the blade, like my puny 14. I have enough projects on the farm that take all of the financial resources I have available; can't buy new or old tools until I get into the "golden years", but most likely those years will see me less golden than now! College-aged children with 28K/yr tuition takes a bunch too. Thankfully they got good grades in HS and were/are able to get grants and scholarships to take care of most of the costs!

    MM

  15. #35
    Join Date
    Apr 2003
    Location
    Greenville, TX, USA
    Posts
    4,361

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    I don't do any commercial work really. It's really a hobby for me, but I wanted all my shop stuff setup before retirement. I also buy/sell to finance my hobby, so a lot of it was paid for by buying multiples at auction and selling off the excess. Buying 3 phase is generally cheaper too as many home shop guys are afraid of it.

    I really hate routers in general. They are too noisy and throw to much dust in the air. I have molding planes for a lot of profiles and a W&H molder too. I use the router where nothing else works or it saves me a bunch of time. I have the shapers for sticking rails and styles.

    I hear you about the college tuition. My daughter is a junior at Harvard. Law school is next. Someday I'll get to retire and play with bees and woodworking.

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