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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    Columbia, South Carolina USA
    Posts
    2,598

    Default another table saw thread

    hello,

    How many folks out there have job site style saws and feel that they are adequate for making things like beekeeping equipment etc.

    I have been Jonesing for a Bosche work site saw (http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00...YAMN2YRJRGZ9SH) for a while, but in reality it's probably 450+ bucks I don't really need to spend given what I'd be using it for. Then I go to Lowe's or Home Depot and I see these cheap little hundred dollar plastic gizmos and wonder if perhaps this is all I need to size pine boards, cut some frame rests , and maybe make some one third to one half length frames for some mini nucs. other than that I think are really talking about things like making birdhouses etc., unless I build a storage shed. I doubt I would ever give in to finish carpentry, I barely have enough time for the bees let alone destroying some very nice hardwood in an attempt to make an heirloom.

    I know the general tool purchasing dogma is get the best to you possibly can for the job because the joy of a low price doesn't last as long as the pain and anguish in buying a cheap tool or something to that effect. I understand that, I believe it, but at the same token there is a fairly decent chance that I'll build myself a small number of mini nucs and and that in itself may end my fascination with woodworking.

    So here is the question: if you have less than $200 to spend which tablesaw would you buy.

    Keith
    Bee Sting Honey - So Good, It Hurts!

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    46,208

    Default

    >So here is the question: if you have less than $200 to spend which tablesaw would you buy.

    I bought a Ryobi from Home Depot for about $75 or so. I've been pretty happy with it. The downsides are:

    I can only get a wobble dado blade and it only goes to 5/8" or so. That means two cuts to do 3/4" for a rabbet joint.

    The fence only goes to about a foot or so. That means I can't set it to cut 13 3/4" for an eight frame top let alone 19 7/8" for a side. It would be nice if I could.

    That said, I still think it was well worth buying and I'm sure I've already gotten my money's worth out of it.

    One up side is, I think you get less problems with kick back with a smaller motor.

    Another is, of course, the price.

    Another is the light weight. I don't have enough room in my garage to run it, so I haul it outside to use it and haul it back in to put it out of the weather. It's quite portable.
    Michael Bush bushfarms.com/bees.htm "Everything works if you let it." ThePracticalBeekeeper.com 40y 200h 37yTF

  3. #3
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    Raleigh, North Carolina
    Posts
    3,598

    Default

    MAN, stuff is expensive!!
    I have a delta similar to this

    http://www.cpowoodworking.com/table_saws/36-979r.html

    I paid about $200 for it 10 years ago new
    I really like the cast iron table to reduce vibration
    of course that makes it really hard to move
    look for second hand so you can splurge on quality and still get most of your money back if you decide you don't want to keep it

    Dave

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Sparta, Tennessee
    Posts
    2,137

    Default

    I have an inexpensive lightweight Craftsman, and its paid for itself many times over. It is lightweight, easy to move in and out of the garage, has its own stand and as long as I measure boards twice and cut once, I seem to be fairly successful...

  5. #5
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Liberty, Maine
    Posts
    197

    Default

    I have one of those light little Craftsman jobs and don't like it at all. I got it when I was building my house, needed something on site. It got most of the jobs done but is not my idea of a nice tool.

    Since then I've inherited my grandfather's old 10" Craftsman table saw. This is the oldie but goodie cast iron table jobs, nice sturdy saw. I replaced the fence with a Shop Fox Classic Fence and it's just an awesome machine now.

    I'm pretty spoiled, my dad has a UniSaw so that's what I was used to using. My current setup isn't quite as nice, but it's close enough for me!

    K

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Location
    avery county n.c.
    Posts
    240

    Default

    I have the Bosh for a job saw and like it.
    The fence of the cheap saws can be dangerous. Make sure it clamps securely and is parallel to the blade or a bit away from the back of the blade.
    Most important...get a good carbide tipped rip or combination blade. It may go $60 but the cheapness of the saw doesn't justify a cheap blade.
    Thanks for your time, Beehopper

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Location
    tulsa, ok usa
    Posts
    2,264

    Default

    You can't beat a Delta contractor saw. Lowes has what I believe is a Delta contractor saw for $449 without the fence.
    http://www.lowes.com/lowes/lkn?actio...979&lpage=none

    As for a fence I would recommend a Biesemeyer fence. You can easily clamp and drill holes in it. I have a unisaw fence and is great for furniture making, but it is hard to clamp things to.

    Regardless of what brand you get make sure it has an induction motor and not a universal motor. With the induction motor the saw is quite when it is running. It only makes noise when you are cutting lumber.

    I use my saw to make inner covers, top covers and bottom boards. That is where you can save money with the saw. You can't save money making boxes or frames. You have to make an awful lot of them too to pay back the cost of the saw, blades, etc.
    Home of the ventilated and sting resistant Ultra Breeze bee suits and jackets
    http://www.honeymoonapiaries.com

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Troupsburg, NY
    Posts
    4,074

    Default

    I wouldn't buy anything with the "Craftsman" name on it. Can you say elcheapo? Spend your money on a good saw, and you won't regret it, but buy a cheap one, and you will soon say "boy, someone should smack me up side my head:mad:."
    "I reject your reality, and substitute my own." Adam Savage

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    Denton, N.C.
    Posts
    68

    Default

    [QUOTE=peggjam;302595]I wouldn't buy anything with the "Craftsman" name on it.

    I have one my wife bought for me 38 years ago. Only replaced the on-off switch on it. I used it to build 2 houses with out any problems.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    St. Albans, Vermont
    Posts
    5,390

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Keith Benson View Post
    So here is the question: if you have less than $200 to spend which tablesaw would you buy.
    Keith
    Buy a used Rockwell, or Delta. I see them in the paper from time to time. Usually $100-200. They last for just about ever...mine is almost 40..and you can get parts at delta.com

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Location
    tulsa, ok usa
    Posts
    2,264

    Default

    Delta or Rockwell (same company but at different times) do hold their value.
    Home of the ventilated and sting resistant Ultra Breeze bee suits and jackets
    http://www.honeymoonapiaries.com

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Troupsburg, NY
    Posts
    4,074

    Default

    [quote=Tommy;302610]
    Quote Originally Posted by peggjam View Post
    I wouldn't buy anything with the "Craftsman" name on it.

    I have one my wife bought for me 38 years ago. Only replaced the on-off switch on it. I used it to build 2 houses with out any problems.
    That was before they discovered "China".
    "I reject your reality, and substitute my own." Adam Savage

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Apr 2003
    Location
    Greenville, TX, USA
    Posts
    4,380

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    berkshire county MA
    Posts
    1,472

    Default

    As with many things, sometimes you can get something used that is better quality and for less money than new. You do have to shop around and know what to look for. Both of my table saws were bought used. Both are Craftsman saws with very heavy cast iron tables and I got the first one in 1975, ran a craft business for a few years, remodeled my house and it's still going strong.

  15. #15
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    Raleigh, North Carolina
    Posts
    3,598

    Default

    Ross posted this one

    http://atlanta.craigslist.org/tls/591967998.html

    it's exactly like mine which I like a lot
    it's also the same price I paid for mine 10 years ago

    Dave

  16. #16
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    Pasco, Wa.
    Posts
    109

    Default

    A friend of mine has a beautiful table saw he inherited from his father. It's probably 50 years old, cast iron table, all kinds of adjustments. Probably 500lbs.

    I do have a cheapo "Delta", from Lowes or Home Depot, can't remember. It was definitely cheap. But also LIGHT, and PORTABLE!!!!!

    I've made all kinds of stuff with it. Root cellar, large greenhouse and shed, projects. I've used dado blades and made some nice joints. Haven't made any hiveware with it, yet.

    One thing that really helped the accuracy of my low end saw....a "sled". It's easy to make, and makes your table saw much more accurate, and safer. You make it with odds and ends in a couple hours. Google it and you will see free plans at many places on the net.

  17. #17
    Join Date
    Dec 1999
    Location
    DuPage County, Illinois USA
    Posts
    9,459

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Keith Benson View Post
    I have been Jonesing for a Bosche work site saw
    Keith, I thought you already bought yourself a saw. If not, I'd still push you to buy a used Delta/Rockwell.
    Regards, Barry

  18. #18
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    Worcester County, Massachusetts
    Posts
    3,640

    Default

    ...i've found that i'm much happier with a good, old radial arm saw for almost everything. lots of advantages over a table saw:

    you can see the blade cutting
    the direction of force on the workpiece is down and away from you (rather than up and towards you)

    ...but i wouldn't buy a new one, or the easily available craftsmans...an old cast iron thing is what you want in an ras.

    deknow

  19. #19
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    Syracuse, NY
    Posts
    93

    Default Delta Contractor Saw

    I used a Delta contractor (USA made!) saw for all of the equipment I have (frames included) Worked great. Dado stacks to 3/4" plus for great joints. I just got a General cabinet saw with a Biesmeyer fence and the only difference is fit and finish.

    The Delta is sitting in my basement right now (Syracuse) Anyone have bees they want to trade. (Sorry if I'm out of line here....bump me if you must :confused

    Eamon (Chefbeek)

  20. #20
    Join Date
    Apr 2003
    Location
    Greenville, TX, USA
    Posts
    4,380

    Default

    It's impossible to rip to the center of a sheet of plywood on a radial arm. It's very dangerous to rip at all. I keep one for crosscuts only. Get it to a perfect 90 degrees, lock it down and leave it.

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