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Thread: table saw blade

  1. #1
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    Default table saw blade

    Hi I finally got myself a table saw. A grizzly! model 1022. found a deal on a used saw on craigslist.
    my question is what do you experienced guys suggest regarding a 10" blade? I don't want to spend too much, 20$ maybe?
    The saw works fine has a decent fence a very strong motor but has a small 8" blade at this time and when I tried to make a rabbet for a bottom board I noticed that it was burning the surface lightly.
    Any tips, suggestions for this first time table saw owner?
    Thanks for all the help.
    There is no greater satisfaction than the satisfaction of a job well done.

  2. #2
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    Get a shaper blade. I buy mine from grizzely, but 10" blades can be pricey, so even if it's an 8" blade, it should still cut what you need to cut. Just needs to be shaper.
    "I reject your reality, and substitute my own." Adam Savage

  3. #3
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    i suggest getting a carbide tipped blade...they hold the sharp edge longer. I'm sure you can find a 10" carbide tipped blade at Lowes or HD for $20 or less.

  4. #4
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    Thanks guys,
    sorry for being so ignorant Peggjam, but what's a shaper blade? I've heard crosscutting and ripping blades..

    and Randy what name brand should I go for? Also how many teeth?
    sorry for so many questions
    There is no greater satisfaction than the satisfaction of a job well done.

  5. #5
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    Carbide will stay sharp longer. More teeth makes a smoother cut.
    Michael Bush bushfarms.com/bees.htm "Everything works if you let it." ThePracticalBeekeeper.com 40y 200h 37yTF

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by balhanapi View Post
    Thanks guys,
    sorry for being so ignorant Peggjam, but what's a shaper blade? I've heard crosscutting and ripping blades..

    and Randy what name brand should I go for? Also how many teeth?
    sorry for so many questions

    Sorry, I ment "sharper" blade. Most times when you start burning wood, it is because your blade is dull. Carbide teeth will definitly last longer.
    "I reject your reality, and substitute my own." Adam Savage

  7. #7
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    I'd get a 10 inch, decent cross cut (about 60 teeth), thin kerf (thinner blade -- requires less power/wastes less wood -- more suitable for a contractor style saw like the Griz 1022). If you're not doing a lot of ripping in greater than 1 inch stock, it'll be suitable for ripping as well as giving an excellent finish on cross cuts.

    Suitable suppliers -- any of the big box places or general hardware stores. Dewalt & Freud have been good blades for me.

    In addition to the sharpness of the blade already mention, the burning is also likely to come from binding. Your fence may be misaligned or more likely, the wood may be bowing back into the blade and closing up the saw kerf. This binding and possible kickback, are two good reasons to run a saw with a splitter installed. Splitters are removed for partial depth cuts and then frequently left off.

    The 1022 is a good value contractor's saw. The number 0ne addition in my opinion after a decent blade is a dado blade (I'd avoid the wobble type and get a stacked dado).

    Have fun and use a push stick.
    Scott
    "If you're doing all the dos, you ain't got time to do the don'ts"

  8. #8
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    Thanks for all the responses esp Beekeep for the detailed answer.
    Quite possible that this blade is dull, But may also be possible that my fence is not minutely aligned. I tried to hold a 1' long 1"x1" tightly along the blade to see if it goes to one side along the fence. looked aligned and parallel to the fence to my novice eyes. Is there a better way to tell if the blade is well aligned to the fence?

    any tips to prevent kickback?
    Thanks for reminding about the push stick. I just made one out of wood. I appreciate your taking the time.
    There is no greater satisfaction than the satisfaction of a job well done.

  9. #9
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    I'd spend more like $40 for a good Freud combination blade, 40 tooth most likely. It will do both crosscut and rip. Align the blade to the miter slots. Chalk one tooth on the blade and check that tooth both at the front and rear of the blade. Measure from the tooth to the miter slot at the front, then rotate the blade so that tooth is at the rear and measure again. The measurements should be the same.

  10. #10
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    >any tips to prevent kickback?

    Don't ever stand directly behind. It doesn't prevent them but it minimizes the damage. Don't get in a bind, of course. Don't let it get any momentum backwards. Use a cheap saw with less power.
    Michael Bush bushfarms.com/bees.htm "Everything works if you let it." ThePracticalBeekeeper.com 40y 200h 37yTF

  11. #11
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    Check to see if your fence is square when locked to your miter groove, then check to make sure your blade is square with your miter groove. If one it off adjust accordingly.

    K

  12. #12
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    I've got the owner's manual. If you want I'll make a copy & snail mail it to you . . . It'll tell you how to align the blade to the miter & then fence to the blade / etc . .

    PM me your address if you want . .
    Scott
    "If you're doing all the dos, you ain't got time to do the don'ts"

  13. #13
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    I'll second (third?) the carbide blade option.

    my advice.. WEAR GLASSES OR GOGGLES. And mind your fingers AT ALL TIMES .

    Maybe that's just me.. but I tend to be accident prone
    to bee or not to bee ~ that is the question

  14. #14
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    I beleive that someone from beesource gave some good tablesaw advice. It went something like: if the wood wasn't there where would your fingers be relative to the blade.

  15. #15
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    That's very good advice astrobeee.
    I just made a splitter for the saw. The factory installed blade guard/splitter is too big plus I will have to remove it everytime I am trying to cut a rabbet. so I made a .75 inch high splitter and screwed it behind the blade. The cut is much more stable now. I think..

    I'll have to do something about the fence it has wobble at the rear end not very pleasant when you are trying to save sometime. You have to measure each time you move the fence.. then adjust and measure again..

    I did get goggles..

    thanks for all the info. You guys are great!
    There is no greater satisfaction than the satisfaction of a job well done.

  16. #16
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    I have an old sears table saw and use a 7 inch skill saw blade for 90% of my cutting when I do not have to cut over 1 inch thick. The thin kerf blades take a lot less power and for tops and bottoms they go through cedar or redwood like butter. At less than $10.00 you are not out much if you are using old fence boards and hit a nail or staple.
    Dan

  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by balhanapi View Post
    Hi I finally got myself a table saw. A grizzly! model 1022. found a deal on a used saw on craigslist.
    my question is what do you experienced guys suggest regarding a 10" blade? I don't want to spend too much, 20$ maybe?
    The saw works fine has a decent fence a very strong motor but has a small 8" blade at this time and when I tried to make a rabbet for a bottom board I noticed that it was burning the surface lightly.
    Any tips, suggestions for this first time table saw owner?
    Thanks for all the help.
    I never spend less than $90-100 on a 10" table saw blade for my cabinet saw. Sure, I watch my spending, but I draw the line at getting cheap blades, unless I am using them as "throw away" blades on construction projects. I have blades which I bought many years ago, and they still work great, as I bought them considering them as part of the machine, not as a disposable accessory.

    To explain, I buy woodworking blades with thick carbide tips. I have had some blades sharpened a dozen or more times (some tips have been replaced). Yep, you will pay more for blades when the tips are heavier in carbide, but you can resharpen the blades numerous times, so your investment over time is minimized.

    That said, you might not want to invest heavily in carbide right now. But, I'd still recommend you get a $50-60 blade. You won't regret spending a bit more, take my word for it. To start, get a combination - or multipurpose/general purpose - blade, 40-50T ATB if possible, with deep gullets. As you get more cash, then invest in a good ripping blade.

    Excellent brands, but pricey:

    $90, thin kerf Tenryu GM25540 (the factory will sharpen your blade for a nominal fee)

    $100, full kerf Freud P410

    $100 Infinity full kerf 010-044


    Less expensive, but okay blades:

    $60, thin kerf Systimatic 37437

    $55, full kerf Amana 610400


    Thin kerf will work better on lower-powered tablesaws, especially when using 110 instead of 220. You should be okay, as I think you have a 2hp on the Grizzly, but it is probably set up for 110.

    Also, clean your blades often, especially with pine - blades gum up a lot making boxes out of pine! Soaking in Simple Green or another degreaser-type cleaner works great.


    MM

  18. #18
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    Our local big box store (Menards) handles Oldham saw blades. If memory serves 10 in. carbide run around $20. I have had very good results with these blades and they seem to hold up well.
    Besides watching out for your eyes and fingers, watch out for your hearing as well!
    Building your own stuff is fun!

  19. #19
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    Jan 2004
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    Berkey, OH, USA
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    Hi guys. Some really good advice here.

    Here are my blades:

    Full kerf carbide tip Freud rip blade
    Full kerf Jesada 80 tooth cross cut

    Thin kerf Freud rip
    THin kerf Amana

    Oldham dado blade - stack not wobble. Essential to have a dado blade for bee equipment.

    If I was in the market now for a blade I would try the Forest blades. They get real good ratings.

    Like the guys said, if you keep away from nails, keep the blades clean, and align your fence you will be shocked at how long you can run a blade without sharpening. Years and years.

    I really like the thin kerf rip blades, use them a lot.

    I use the 80 tooth mostly for plywood and fine furniture work that is cross cut.

    If I had to get 2 blades on a budget I would get a freud thin kerf and an oldham stack dado.

  20. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by BerkeyDavid View Post
    Hi guys. Some really good advice here.

    If I was in the market now for a blade I would try the Forest blades. They get real good ratings.


    If I had to get 2 blades on a budget I would get a freud thin kerf and an oldham stack dado.
    I have a couple of the Forrest Woodworker II blades, they are maybe 8.25/10. I'd rate the Tenryu GM25540 higher at 9.5/10 and Freud P410 about 8.75/10. I have only tried the Infinity 010-044 on someone else's machine - it was very smooth, though.

    Freud also makes a very affordable 8" dado stack - the SD208, which is very good for the money with excellent square bottom cuts ~$80-100. For starting out, you don't need a 10" dado set.

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