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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
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    McKean County, Pennsylvania, USA
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    Default Honey locust trees as a nectar source?

    Hello. I looked in my 1945 ABC & XYZ and The Hive and the Honey Bee and I can find black locust which is what I wanted to plant, but the grower isn't offering them this year. The grower is only showing honey locust, which I can't find mention of in the above books. So I was wondering, is honey locust a good nectar source? I am clearing around 5 acres of brushy woods ground and I know the blackberries and raspberries that will come in will provide nectar but I would like to plant trees that provide nectar. Thank you.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
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    Troupsburg, NY
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    You come up and you can dig all the black locust trees you want....at a reasonable price. You only need about 10 good ones started to start a locust forest.....things almost grow like weeds.
    "I reject your reality, and substitute my own." Adam Savage

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Location
    Princeton, West Virginia
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    478

    Default Not to knock Peggjam out of getting some land cleared :)

    If you are in an area that has mining, talk to some of the reclaimation companies. They sometimes put black locust seed on the land they are reclaiming. The way those things grow here, there is only a year between a seed and a sapling you can transplant
    What I Smoke has a Sting to it

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Location
    Oxford, Kansas
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    Default

    I have read honey locust produced very little nectar. it gets its name from the color of the wood

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    McKean County, Pennsylvania, USA
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    Default

    Thanks all. I checked Musser forest website and they are selling Black locust seedlings. I like them for fenceposts and a little honey would be grand as well. Thanks for the offer peggjam, I'll be in touch.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    Erie, PA
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    Just be careful where you plant them. I've got a ravine full of them, and my spring house has been crushed twice by black locusts blown over by wind (soft soil) or splitting out of a cluster.

    But the honey is worth it!

    Anybody available to help me cut some locust logs into posts? Wishing I had a saw mill...
    Last edited by Hobie; 03-20-2008 at 10:15 AM.
    “The keeping of bees is like the direction of sunbeams.” -Henry David Thoreau

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Apr 2003
    Location
    Greenville, TX, USA
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    Make sure any locust you get is thornless. The honey locust around here have thorns you can drive through an oak plank.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    red lion, pa usa
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    38

    Default

    locust honey is one of the best, its hard to get a good crop every year it doesnt bloom long and the weather has to cooperate, it seems to bloom in abundance every 3 years or so, but when you get a good crop it will bring top dollar.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Sparta, Tennessee
    Posts
    2,137

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Ross View Post
    Make sure any locust you get is thornless. The honey locust around here have thorns you can drive through an oak plank.
    Made me laugh at your comment "thorns you can drive through an oak plank!" The young black locust I have on my property have wicked thorns, but the older ones don't, from what I can tell. Last year was a great year for honey from them though!

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Apr 2003
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    Greenville, TX, USA
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    Honey locust usually have the worst thorns around here.

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Location
    Loganville, GA
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    I surely do hope there are folks cashing in on the locust up around Baltimore! It's insane, the number of those things up there!!!!!!

    Locust honey and me go back to my childhood. Holds a place in my heart for sure! Yum!
    "Success is not final, failure is not fatal: it is the courage to continue that counts." Winston Churchill

  12. #12
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    Erie, PA
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    Just remember: the locust honey is generally from black locust, not honey locust.

    If you ever try to get rid of locust trees, heed this true story: I had one, rotten and full of ants. leaning toward the house. I had it cut down, then went on a 2 week vacation. When I got back, the entire yard was covered with hundreds of locust trees, literally about a foot tall, that had sprung up from the root system. I cut and pulled and dug and chopped, but the only way to get them to stop was to choose one in a reasonable location (farther from the house), and let it grow. Then, all the little sprouts stopped. It just wanted to live.
    “The keeping of bees is like the direction of sunbeams.” -Henry David Thoreau

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
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    Troupsburg, NY
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    I've had them grow back from the stump too.
    "I reject your reality, and substitute my own." Adam Savage

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Location
    Princeton, West Virginia
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    Quote Originally Posted by peggjam View Post
    I've had them grow back from the stump too.
    Around here they cut the posts to length and set them for fence posts. One time I saw a green branch and leaves shoot out from a newly set post. It didn't live but a few weeks but it tried.
    What I Smoke has a Sting to it

  15. #15

    Default The name is misleading

    Honey locust trees produce no nectar or pollen.

    Black locust is what you want. Not very reliable production wise but they are beutiful when they bloom with those hanging, chandilear type blossums.

    Make good firewood too if one happens to blow down.
    BEE-L snob since 1999
    What's a swarm in April worth?

  16. #16
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    Lake county, Indiana 46408-4109
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by kc in wv View Post
    Around here they cut the posts to length and set them for fence posts. One time I saw a green branch and leaves shoot out from a newly set post. It didn't live but a few weeks but it tried.
    Thats why the old timers skined the bark off of fence post so they didnt grow, thats the way they did it when I was a lottle shaver and that was a WHILE BACK
    Ed, KA9CTT profanity is IGNORANCE made audible
    you can`t fix stupid not even with duct tape

  17. #17
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    McKean County, Pennsylvania, USA
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    Default

    The multi-use possibility is why I wanted to go with the black locust. I'm glad I asked here and didn't just buy the honey locust. I am always in need of good fence posts and have been buying locust posts so it's time to plant for my own use. That they will also produce good bee forage on occasion is a bonus. Thank you for the info.

  18. #18
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
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    Troupsburg, NY
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by kc in wv View Post
    Around here they cut the posts to length and set them for fence posts. One time I saw a green branch and leaves shoot out from a newly set post. It didn't live but a few weeks but it tried.
    I had a maple post do that, didn't last very long. Few weeks is all.
    "I reject your reality, and substitute my own." Adam Savage

  19. #19
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    Lancaster CA
    Posts
    410

    Default Off subject but what kind of locust is this?

    On subject. Bees do visit honey locust for pollen, not good nectar source. I know honey and black locust, but what is the name of the locust that has a huge curly seed pod. The pod is 8 in log and curly. The seeds are as large as a bean. Now flower like black locust and no thorns. Seeds germinate readily.

  20. #20
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Location
    Goshen, IN, USA
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    70

    Default

    that tree sounds "like" a honey locust to me. the pod is right, although a little small compared to the wild honey locust around here. also, a cultivar of the tree is grown without the thorns. I love this tree. shame it doesn't do so well for nectar.

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