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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
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    SW Virginia
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    38

    Default Nozevit - Nosema

    I found this product http://nozevit.com/ which is mentioned in Randy Oliver's latest article: http://www.scientificbeekeeping.com/...ask=view&id=56

    Does anyone have any additional info on this product? Has anyone used this product?

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    Anchorage, Alaska
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    1,649

    Default

    Nozevit has been briefly mentioned a few times on Bee-L. You can read the comments at:

    http://listserv.albany.edu:8080/cgi-bin/wa?S1=bee-l

    type the word nozevit in the ‘Search for:’ box.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    Lima, Ohio, USA
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    720

    Default

    Bee-L was the first place I've seen it. to quote Bee-L:
    the latest study in Europe that I am aware of and a part of finds that the PH of the honey bee changes with Nosema. We have tested with NOZEVIT and found that it corrects the PH imbalance which allows the inner intestinal tract to regain it's elasticity and therefore inhibiting the Nosema from joining or "impaling" the inner wall. After just a short period the Nosema starts passing through the Honey Bee and the spore count drops precipitously.

    We treated the second time 10 days later and found an amazing difference in spore count. We are hesitant to claim"therapeutic" results. Our tests and on going test show in the field and in the lab an extremely effective and different approach to the Nosema situation.

    Field results in Italy, Slovenia, Croatia, Bosnia, Serbia, Hungary, and Austria show identical results. We have beekeepers suffering substantial,(up to 100%) never before realized losses in these countries, while those using NOZEVIT - in close proximity to those previously mentioned - are seeing little to no winter losses as of this week.

    These studies mirror the previous studies conducted by a private chemical company that has since passed from the scene because of the Bosnian war.

    I saw at the meeting in Wooster this month that Simpsons Beekeeping Supplies also now sells it.

    -Tim



  4. #4
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    SW Virginia
    Posts
    38

    Default

    Thank you Dick and Tim. This is good info. I would be tempted to try this product if I knew what exactly it is. The info is pretty sketchy on the actual contents.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    Anchorage, Alaska
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    1,649

    Default

    yes, the information is pretty sketchy. apparantly the stuff is used in eastern europe according to dr. joe carson who says he's the distributor for it. likely, it is not officially approved for treatment of hives in the u.s.

    there are a few alaska beekeepers on beesource. maybe dr. carson is among them and can shed some more light on this stuff. while i don't know dr. carson on a personal basis, i have seen him at a local beekeeping meeting a couple of times.

    incidentally, the dr., if i'm correct, is not a medical or phd dr., he is a minister or pastor in one of the local chuches.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    Knoxville, Tennessee,USA
    Posts
    207

    Default

    Why not use Fumigilin-B. With all its benefits, curing nosema is just a side affect. "A pancea for nosema"

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    Camarillo, CA, USA
    Posts
    308

    Default Why use antibiotic

    Quote Originally Posted by CSbees View Post
    Why not use Fumigilin-B. With all its benefits, curing nosema is just a side affect. "A pancea for nosema"
    Do you need to use an antibiotic on everything ?

    Would be nice to have other options, hope this product pans out.

    What do you mean by benifits of Fum-B ?

    Note. myself and other beeks, that have used Fumigilin-B get a side effect, chalk brood. The Fum-B does not get rid of nosema, only controls growth in bee gut. Solve one problem, get another.


    Larry

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Location
    Jackson, MO
    Posts
    1,858

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Dick Allen View Post
    yes, incidentally, the dr., if i'm correct, is not a medical or phd dr., he is a minister or pastor in one of the local chuches.
    Reminds me of a mother who introduced her son, a Ph.D., and said, "Yes, this is my son the doctor, but not the kind that helps people."

    "Dr." Grant, D. Min.
    Beekeeping With Twenty-five Hives: https://www.createspace.com/4152725

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    LA Co, Calif, USA
    Posts
    86

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by LSPender View Post

    Note. myself and other beeks, that have used Fumigilin-B get a side effect, chalk brood. The Fum-B does not get rid of nosema, only controls growth in bee gut. Solve one problem, get another.


    Larry
    Are you saying that you used Fumigilin-B to treat nosema, and THEN ended up with chalkbrood?? I thought I had read that the presence of chalkbrood could be an indicator of nosema?

    (I have appreciated out open you have been with your posts and your personal experiences.)

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Location
    Crown Point , (NW) Indiana
    Posts
    529

    Default

    [to quote Bee-L:

    the latest study in Europe that I am aware of and a part of finds that the PH of the honey bee changes with Nosema. We have tested with NOZEVIT and found that it corrects the PH imbalance which allows the inner intestinal tract to regain it's elasticity and therefore inhibiting the Nosema from joining or "impaling" the inner wall. After just a short period the Nosema starts passing through the Honey Bee and the spore count drops precipitously.]

    This is not an argument against you Tim, I understand you were repeating a post from elsewhere. But what I understand is:

    Adjusting pH alone is not enough to prevent infection.
    This has been proven in a couple studies using vinegar (acetic acid) in feed.
    There was no improvement in the prevention of the disease.

    Fum.B. inhibits the digestive juices that rupture the spores.
    Short of attacking the spore directly, there is no better way.
    Spores can be attacked directly by acids or essential oils in proper doses.

    I am highly suspect that the studies may appear to improve health, but are flawed because ANY feeding will increase gut motility and pass spores quicker. This results in fewer spores per portion of feces and makes the infection look like it is improved or cured. But likely, a low level infection remains. A low level infection will still serious impact a queen laying capability and still be a reservoir for infection later.

    The same results can had by feeding syrup and pollen supplements. Many will tell you that they see no signs of disease or that assume they are cured, but I assure you a low level infection remains. Spores can remain active in live or dead bees for 2 years. Any real treatment has to have a protocol for no less than that time period.

    Fum.B. is no better. It "cures" nosema only from season to season. But there is a lull in the infection over the summer (when we can not feed Fum.B.). The infecting spores can remain in a proximity that allow for reinfection. This is why it is important to treat in a manner that actually destroys the spore itself. There are natural occurring substances that are not illegal to have residual in honey and can continue to work over the summer to kill the spore.
    There is always more than one way to skin a cat, that's of course if you're into eating cats.

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
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    Default

    >There are natural occurring substances that are not illegal to have residual in honey and can continue to work over the summer to kill the spore.

    And those are...?
    Michael Bush bushfarms.com/bees.htm "Everything works if you let it." ThePracticalBeekeeper.com 40y 200h 37yTF

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    SW Virginia
    Posts
    38

    Default Vita Feed Gold

    [QUOTE=NW IN Beekeeper;301276][to quote Bee-L:

    "I am highly suspect that the studies may appear to improve health, but are flawed because ANY feeding will increase gut motility and pass spores quicker. "

    I had this same thought when I saw Vita Feed Gold: http://www.vita-europe.com/index.htm

    Perhaps it's just a feeding stimulant.

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    Fort Worth, Texas, USA
    Posts
    224

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by NW IN Beekeeper View Post
    Adjusting pH alone is not enough to prevent infection.
    This has been proven in a couple studies using vinegar (acetic acid) in feed.
    There was no improvement in the prevention of the disease.
    I just posted about this on a different thread: http://beesource.com/forums/showthre...=216617&page=3 post #26.

    I realize that pH alone may not be the answer, but acetic acid and vinegar are two different things. Even though they may have the same inherent pH they do not necessarily have the same pH-altering effect on physiology when consumed. Whole foods and isolated active ingredients don't meet the body the same way. This study does not prove what you're saying, it simply proves acetic acid alone doesn't help

  14. #14
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    Sep 2004
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    Anchorage, Alaska
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    Default

    I guess the questions that are begging to be asked is: What Studies and done by Whom?!?!

  15. #15
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    Sep 2007
    Location
    Fort Worth, Texas, USA
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    224

  16. #16
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Western Interior Alaska
    Posts
    3

    Default Nozevit Reply

    Nozevit is in use in the U. S. and Canada by many Bee Keepers and they are pleased with the results. I do not know any of the previous post authors; none have seen or used Nozevit and therefore have no personal experience with it. We are always happy to answer any questions concerning Nozevit. Personal remarks or innuendo are not productive. Nozevit is a natural tree bark extract that has indeed been in use as a traditional recipe for many, many years in Central Europe. We do not claim Nozevit as a cure all for any honey bee malady, condition, or disease. We can share customers personal experiences and testimonies with the product. Nozevit is a standardized 20% oak tree bark (specific to a region in Europe) and 80% water extract - there are no chemicals used in the extraction process which is preformed in Zagreb, Croatia. Many have tested Salicin (obviously from the bark of the Willow) which is not found in Nozevit, to be ineffective. I believe there are going to be many new discoveries, but not necessarily new products, coming forth in the near future which will be of great benefit to bee keepers around the world, of which in my opinion, Nozevit is one.

    As to my education, qualifications, and religious convictions - a requirement I was unaware of on this forum - to elucidate would not change Nozevit as I am not the bee keeper who originally came up with the recipe (decades old) nor the scientist who standardized the product. I am one who was an Engineering Consultant (P. E. and M. E.) for many years throughout many parts of the world. I completed my student teaching in the late 70's, did extensive work in Anthropology, Archeology, Sociology, among other disciplines. I have attended 11 colleges and universities in addition to many private corporate schools. I was certified and qualified with three distinct medical organizations in the field of emergency medical training and am a certified Family Counselor. I make my living as a Bee Keeper today and travel the world extensively looking for ideas, answers, and products that might just have an impact on the bee keeping world. Having traveled to many parts of South East Asia, Western, Central, and Easter Europe, Scandinavia, UK, and other parts of the world, I realize more each day that there is much to learn and much out there to be shared. I do not know it all and hesitate to criticize, condemn or complain about anyones products, procedures, or positions concerning their personal bee keeping habits. My religious convictions are mine.

    A vituperative runaway rant unbridled by reason or factuality accomplishes nothing.

    Luke 6:39 And he spake a parable unto them, Can the blind lead the blind? shall they not both fall into the ditch?
    Dr. Carson

  17. #17
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Troupsburg, NY
    Posts
    4,074

    Default

    "But there is a lull in the infection over the summer (when we can not feed Fum.B.). The infecting spores can remain in a proximity that allow for reinfection. This is why it is important to treat in a manner that actually destroys the spore itself. There are natural occurring substances that are not illegal to have residual in honey and can continue to work over the summer to kill the spore."

    There is no lull when dealing with nosema ceranae. It is active year round, which is what makes it so deadly.
    "I reject your reality, and substitute my own." Adam Savage

  18. #18
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    45,340

    Default

    >"Acidic Food & Nosema Disease"

    Interesting. Since sugar syrup is alkali and honey is acidic and Nosema does better in an alkali environment...
    Michael Bush bushfarms.com/bees.htm "Everything works if you let it." ThePracticalBeekeeper.com 40y 200h 37yTF

  19. #19
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Location
    White County, Arkansas
    Posts
    874

    Default

    Again my ignorance shows through.

    Is nectar acidic or alkali or does it depend on the source?

    Or has it never been studied?

    Is stored sugar syrup still alkali in the comb?

    If it is, then wouldn't it be best to alter the ph of sugar syrup to a more acidic state?

  20. #20
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Grass Valley, California
    Posts
    18

    Default

    Hi Dick,

    This thread was brought to my attention by a friend.

    Nosevit is an extract of the bark of a species of oak.
    I do not know the mode of action, but in general, the tannins in oak barks denature proteins, which is why they are used to "tan" skins into leather. Placing a tea bag on a canker sore does the same thing.

    Perhaps the tanning action toughens the bee gut???

    Nozevit is used at a very low concentration, so I have no idea if it is strong enough to do so.

    In any case, I am trialling the product currently (in fact, am doing the third application today). Will report results soon.

    Randy Oliver

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