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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Sep 2016
    Location
    Poland
    Posts
    4

    Default How to protect hives?

    Dear Beekeepers,

    I would like to ask you for favor:

    I am doing some research related to hives and bees safety. Could you tell me:

    1) What is the most common problem with beehives protection and, according to you, what would be the best solution for those issues?

    2) What would be the average net income from one beehive per year? (commercial scale)

    Apologies, if I repeat the question, please let me know the link to similar posts.

    Thank you.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    May 2016
    Location
    Deer Lodge MT
    Posts
    451

    Default Re: How to protect hives?

    What do you mean by protection? Are you referring to protecting from preditors such as bears and skunks or are you asking what it takes to make a hive successful. The latter involves basic management to guard against mites, beetles, other honey bees; called robbing etc.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    May 2015
    Location
    Champaign, Illinois
    Posts
    1,540

    Default Re: How to protect hives?

    1) Lots of pests (both micro and macro)
    2) It's not as simple as x hives times y income per hive to get the yield z. Bee math is not a perfect science because it is agriculture and highly dependent upon weather and environment. Get the weather figured out perfectly and call me.
    Internet credibility is an oxymoron

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    Location
    Sacramento, CA, USA
    Posts
    5,651

    Default Re: How to protect hives?

    You mean to insert a GPS device under the hive to avoid
    it from being stolen? Or recover the hives after they are gone? Is this
    how you call a protected hive? Please be more specific in your research questions.
    Don't mix foreign bees into a virgin hive. She might get balled 100% of the time! When will you ever learn, huh?

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Sep 2016
    Location
    Poland
    Posts
    4

    Default Re: How to protect hives?

    Quote Originally Posted by beepro View Post
    You mean to insert a GPS device under the hive to avoid
    it from being stolen?
    Beepro, yes that is what I meant. What do you do to protect them against, for example, theft.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Sep 2016
    Location
    Poland
    Posts
    4

    Default Re: How to protect hives?

    For example, theft.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    Ojai, California
    Posts
    2,115

    Default Re: How to protect hives?

    1) Get your branding irons. Brand you hives inside and out. Brand every frame with your county identification number. YOU may want brands in several languages - Polish, Russian, German, French, Latvian, Estonian, Lithuanian, Suomi, Swedish, but that would be difficult to get all on one hive. Maybe just Polish, German, and French or Russian?

    2) Do not paint the hives white, leave them natural wood colored, which is much more difficult to spot from the air. You can dip them in 240 degree F wax for 10 minutes to give weather resistance instead of painting them. They will last for perhaps 40 years. Boiled linseed oil also works. Both leave the hive much more difficult to spot.

    3) Take photos of your equipment. Difficult for him to explain why YOU have photos of "his" bee equipment...also makes a good addition to your post of stolen equipment here on Beesource, on Beemaster.com, World of Beekeeping.com, all the newspapers willing to publish your photos, etc. More eyes are NOT his best friend.

    4) Place them far from the road, out of sight from passing vehicles. Remember to check for the sight line of taller trucks.

    5) Before assembling hive bodies, drill a small hole sideways into the gap below a finger box joint. Drop in a flake of sheet metal with your initials stamped in it. If you spot you stolen hives, the police can identify one with an X-ray. Remember not to staple that finger.

    6) The GPS device is expensive, but works about like a Lo-Jack device on an automobile. That is cheap insurance compared to having your bees stolen right before almond pollination. This is perhaps the best way to get your hives back. Don't try to recover them yourself. Call the sheriff and go with him. Bring him a bee suit for him to wear. Consider wearing a Kevlar or Spectra vest while recovering your hives - you wouldn't want to get shot over bees, but they know they are guilty and could be hostile.

    7) A vibration sensor inside a box to trip a cell phone dialed to your phone number, but not yet dialed, will alert you to hive activity, be it due to bears, raccoons, thieves, or drunken idiots who shoot bee hives. Check the computer screen to see if the GPS device is moving. If it moves down the highway, call the sheriff and stay on the phone and help guide the chopper or the patrol truck to the bee rustler.

    8) Do make plaster casts of the tire tracks of the thieves' truck, forklift, and any shoe prints. You may need it for evidence. A thief who claims they are his will look pretty silly trying to explain what his tire prints and boot tracks are doing on your bee drop.

    9) Write your legislators encouraging laws that have HARSH punishment for bee colony theft. I say minimum 5 years without possibility of parole plus 1 year per colony and pay 5 times the value of the hive plus 5 times the fees of the highest paying crop pollination fees during the time the were missing plus 5 times the value of the state's average honey yield per colony .

    Many other ideas are out there. Let's hear them. Put the BIG HURT on bee rustlers!

    ***************

    Income per hive is dependent on the skill of the beekeeper, the annual rainfall, the type of hive, how many of the right flower seeds got left last year, how close to the ideal number of bees on a drop location, how many beekeepers set up nearby, etc., etc., etc... Too many variables to consider, even before we get to the years prices for liquid honey, organic honey, honey-in-the-comb, beeswax, propolis, nucleus colonies, queens, etc., etc., etc., and the cost of fuel, how far you have to travel to get to a nectar flow, hotel and camp costs, tires, food on the road. All affect the bottom line on the profit-or-loss statement.

    Income and costs are all over the place. We do a dance and think about the situation full-time, even though we may only work at it part-time. The beekeeper is a business manager, farmer, salesman, scientist, carpenter, truck driver, research reader, stategist, etc...
    Last edited by kilocharlie; 09-04-2016 at 07:02 PM.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Sep 2016
    Location
    Poland
    Posts
    4

    Default Re: How to protect hives?

    Thank you so much kilocharlie for very inspiring ideas!

  9. #9
    Join Date
    May 2015
    Location
    Champaign, Illinois
    Posts
    1,540

    Default Re: How to protect hives?

    Find a tall building with limited access and keep your bees on the rooftop.
    The logistic problems that you'll have are the same problems that will prevent theft.
    Internet credibility is an oxymoron

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jun 2014
    Location
    San Mateo, CA
    Posts
    602

    Default Re: How to protect hives?

    A claymore placed under the bottom board generally works pretty well to prevent theft
    The bees are good at fixing my mistakes

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    Location
    Sacramento, CA, USA
    Posts
    5,651

    Default Re: How to protect hives?

    Trail cams set up nearby and concealed from sight.
    Chain the hives on the hive pallet.
    Weight the hive pallets down with heavy bricks/weight irons (both are free on CL.)
    Put the heavy free weight under the screen bottom board. And put up the razor blades barb wire fence around
    the hive perimeter. Set up a double bull-horn alarm system that you can hear miles away. Put up a security vid system with cams facing the entrance gate. Have it connected to your smart phone to monitor it 24/7. Subscribed to a security service to come out and check on your hives. Put 2 German Shepard inside the fence to guard your hives using a double fenced in set up.
    Motion sensor and dogs don't mix too well so use either or.
    Don't mix foreign bees into a virgin hive. She might get balled 100% of the time! When will you ever learn, huh?

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