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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Location
    Tallahassee, Florida
    Posts
    5

    Smile Hand Holds in Supers

    I am in the process of building some deep and medium boxes. I am leaning towards using cleats instead of the hand holds but was curious how the "big guys" make the inset hand holds. I would assume that it is routed ??? If so, they must use a special jig to get the cuts just right..

    Curious minds would like to know

  2. #2
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Hillsboro, Wisconsin, USA
    Posts
    1,672

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Location
    Wheatfield, IN
    Posts
    2,069

    Default

    Save yourself the trouble and use cleats!
    Dan Williamson
    B&C Honey Farm http://www.flickr.com/photos/9848229@N05/

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Location
    Loganville, GA
    Posts
    2,172

    Default

    A 3/4 cut works pretty good, so does cleats. But if you're referring to the pretty scalloped cuts, they are made with a custom blade on a custom saw table set up to do nothing else. I'm sure they could be made another way but way to much trouble.
    "Success is not final, failure is not fatal: it is the courage to continue that counts." Winston Churchill

  5. #5

    Smile Trouble for sure

    Quote Originally Posted by Bizzybee View Post
    way but way to much trouble.
    I agree too much trouble! I won’t go to the trouble even with the following:

    I built a fixture to do the fancy cuts on a standard table saw, The fixture was simple to make and it gets clamped down to the saw table. The fixture prevents the board from kicking out. It has a hinged lid that holds the board securely. Then I put a variable speed drill on the blade rotate wheel so I would not have to crank. This made it fast and safe to make the cuts. BUT it was way to much trouble. I will never do it again. From now on I'm making cleats from scrap, Just need an angle cut on top to keep rain from resting on top of the cleat.
    Mark Zeiner
    Mason Oh

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Location
    Jackson, MO
    Posts
    1,858

    Default

    I've built my own boxes and tried to use a router. What a pain, and very time consuming.

    I switched to cleats, and I like to do two special touches. First, my cleat runs the full width of the front and back of the hive, 16-1/4". Second, I cut my cleats with a slight angle on the lower edge. Basically, I cut a 1x4 into two equal strips. Instead of the conventional 90 degree angle, I make it 75 degrees.

    What I end up with is a strip that has a longer front and a shorter back, the back is toward the hive body and the front faces away from the hive. This configuration makes for a better grip. This way, your fingers are much, much less likely to slip with a conventional, straight 90 degree cut.

    If I had the power to draw a picture, I would. If this is not clear, I'll take pictures and post else where.

    Grant
    Jackson, MO http://www.25hives.homestead.com
    Beekeeping With Twenty-five Hives: https://www.createspace.com/4152725

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Location
    York, South Carolina
    Posts
    136

    Default Hand Holds

    I use a dado blade set to 3/4" width and cut slots 3/8" deep about 4" long. Works great!
    Barney
    What\'s smarter than a talking Parrot-----A spelling bee

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    College Station, Texas
    Posts
    6,973

    Default

    what mr williamson said...

    did you ever consider how odd the tradional hand holds really are?

    I mean picking stuff up with your thumb pointed straight away from the load being carried is extremely unnatural.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Location
    Wheatfield, IN
    Posts
    2,069

    Default

    Grant... I have a few cleats a guy put on some boxes he was assembling for me... He thought it would be a nice touch to cut the cleat at an angle to have more grip underneath.. While it theory its nice.... It actually puts more pressure on my fingers over a smaller spot when lifting heavy supers. I do not like it. Maybe your's aren't cut at as much of an angle as mine.

    It was a nice thought but not what I was wanting!
    Dan Williamson
    B&C Honey Farm http://www.flickr.com/photos/9848229@N05/

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    Ludington, Michigan
    Posts
    611

    Default hand holds

    This is the method I used. It will give you perfect scalloped handhold that wont collect water and snow. It not hard to set up. I only clamp one end and hold the other down by hand. You want the cut to be 5/8 inch deep. On my saw that is 1/4" per turn of blade height so I do the cut in 3 cuts. Two full cuts and one half. It does make alot on saw dust.


    http://forum.beemaster.com/index.php?topic=1526.0

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Pepperell, MA.
    Posts
    3,737

    Default

    I didn't like the cleats sticking out so I went with slots cut by a dado. Looks and works fine.
    "My wife always wanted girls. Just not thousands and thousands of them......"

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Location
    Jackson, MO
    Posts
    1,858

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Dan Williamson View Post
    Grant... It was a nice thought but not what I was wanting!
    I don't have an exact angle. Boxes from Rossman have this kind of an angle cut into their conventional hand holds. Yeah, not perfect.

    Grant
    Jackson, mO
    Beekeeping With Twenty-five Hives: https://www.createspace.com/4152725

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Location
    North Hills, CA USA
    Posts
    453

    Default

    On your table saw use a molding head with cove profile blades. Cut 5/8" deep AFTER box is assembled (you really have something to hold on to then).
    Make a plunge cut with a stop strip clamped to table top to control kick back. Moving box away from you using rip fence set to hight of handle wanted.
    Makes nice hand holds. If bought, Saw table insert, Molding head and Cutters cost aprox. $ 80.00.
    Walt

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    Madisonville KY
    Posts
    95

    Default

    After reading this tread I decided to try to make D hand hold, for fun. Here is how I done it and it worked out well for me. I have a set of Fosner type drill bits for clock making. I built me a little jig so that the hive side stands at a slight angle and then on my drill press I used a 4 1/2 dia clock bit. With the press on as slow of a speed as I can get itI just drill them.

  15. #15
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    VENTURA, California, USA
    Posts
    3,604

    Smile No Machined Hand Holds

    The hand hold can be the weakest part of a super shell.
    There is a trend away from the hand hold.
    If you want to place a migratory cleat flush with the top to prevent braking out the side next to the frame rest it does not match up with the factory cut hand hold. It's cut low for the additional expense of a telescoping cover.
    I had Dadant ship me 750 shells without the hand holds.
    One less place for black widow spiders to nest.
    Regards,
    Ernie
    Lucas Apiaries
    Ernie
    My websitehttp://bees4u.com/

  16. #16
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Location
    Lyons, CO
    Posts
    3,027

    Default

    Yeah, that's what's been holding me back. The handholds are too high to cleat with a telescoping cover, and I really want cleats but then there'll be a pocket up under the cleat. Black windows are exactly my concern.

    I am in the process of switching mainly to migratory lids so I can have my cleats and lift them too, but there's still the old telescoping lid colonies that wouldn't be able to cover those boxes.
    Bees, brews and fun
    in Lyons, CO

  17. #17
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Sparta, Tennessee
    Posts
    2,129

    Default

    I just cut my hand holds with a circular saw, I set the blade depth, mark the top of the hand hold, mark the lower part of the hand hold, put a center line down the middle....and lower the blade maybe 3/16 and do a pass, then drop the blade down a bit more and keep repeating until the rest is flush with the box.

    Works for me.

  18. #18
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Location
    tulsa, ok usa
    Posts
    2,264

    Smile

    Dan, I checked out your deboxer. I am going to have to make one!
    Home of the ventilated and sting resistant Ultra Breeze bee suits and jackets
    http://www.honeymoonapiaries.com

  19. #19
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Location
    Wheatfield, IN
    Posts
    2,069

    Default

    I can't take credit for the design... I got it from another beekeeper....the actual unit so I didn't have to build it... I ain't smart enough to think that stuff up on my own! LOL

    But it is darn handy for the small player!
    Dan Williamson
    B&C Honey Farm http://www.flickr.com/photos/9848229@N05/

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