Results 1 to 4 of 4
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    Camarillo, CA, USA
    Posts
    308

    Default Nosema, new questions

    How does an antibiotic, fumagillian, controll a microsporidan (fungus), further defined as a unicellular parasite ? I have always been under the understanding that antibiotics were to fight bacteria.

    I was rereading the definitions on WIKIPEDIA of nosema A & C. and saw under treatment for Nosema A. a product called PROTOFIL which was teasted in Romania and presented to Apimondia. Does anyone have any experiance with or insights on this?

    Larry Pender

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    Cleveland, Texas
    Posts
    1,378

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by LSPender View Post
    How does an antibiotic, fumagillian, controll a microsporidan (fungus), further defined as a unicellular parasite ? I have always been under the understanding that antibiotics were to fight bacteria.

    I was rereading the definitions on WIKIPEDIA of nosema A & C. and saw under treatment for Nosema A. a product called PROTOFIL which was teasted in Romania and presented to Apimondia. Does anyone have any experiance with or insights on this?

    Larry Pender
    Here is a link to the Apimondia writeup:

    http://www.apimondia.org/apiacta/art...hioveanu_1.pdf

    If you look at the contents of Protofil, you will find it contains extracts from several plants, among which is thymus vulgaris (the source plant for thymol).
    "The UNKNOWN, huh? That would be SNORBERT ZANGOX over in Waycross."

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    Manitoba Canada
    Posts
    5,787

    Default

    My understanding is that the antibiotic, fumagillian, only controls the Nosema as its in its active state of growth, the sprores are unaffected by the treatment. A treatment of funagillian only goes as far as to delay the eruption of the infection. And with Nosema A, it proved useful as the bees were able to hold on til spring, when they could help themselves releave the Nosema during good flight.
    But with Nosema C, they are suggesting further treatment in spring, to further aid the bees, becasue they cant releave themselves as easily on Nosema C as they could with A.

    In my eye this could present a huge problem with residues. It would be very important to have a spring time treatment that gets completely used up within the early spring period.
    It also is going to make our operational cost rise quit a bit.
    Ian Steppler >> Canadian Beekeeper's Blog
    www.stepplerfarms.com

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    45,458

    Default

    It interferes with methionine aminopeptidase 2 utilization. Probably not that enlightening, but that's how it works.
    Michael Bush bushfarms.com/bees.htm "Everything works if you let it." ThePracticalBeekeeper.com 40y 200h 37yTF

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
Ads