Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 20 of 23
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    VENTURA, California, USA
    Posts
    3,604

    Smile Honeybees Removing Varroa Mites Through Grooming Video

    FYI:
    Thanks for modern technology!

    http://globalswarminghoneybees.blogs...e-through.html

    Regards,

    Ernie

    Lucas Apiaries
    ( My breeder queens are purchased from Glenn Apiaries and I do have their Russian and VHS stock.)
    Ernie
    My websitehttp://bees4u.com/

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    Manitoba Canada
    Posts
    5,992

    Default

    Cool video. Did I see that right. Did those bees tear the mites apart after grooming them off?
    Ian Steppler >> Canadian Beekeeper's Blog
    www.stepplerfarms.com

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Location
    Jackson, Ga USA
    Posts
    146

    Smile Fgmo

    That is why I use fog with FGMO regularly. It stimulates the bees to groom.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    Manitoba Canada
    Posts
    5,992

    Default

    Or you can save all your time fogging, and incorperate hygenic stock,
    Ian Steppler >> Canadian Beekeeper's Blog
    www.stepplerfarms.com

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    VENTURA, California, USA
    Posts
    3,604

    Smile What does the bees do with the brushed off mite?

    I have looked at that video several times and it appears that the bee is chewing the mite. I just can not see at that angle.
    I like the slow motion in the video as it really helps to view the actual grooming.
    There is another concept about a grooming dance so that another bee can bite the mite.
    Foggers: If you want your lungs to deteriorate use them. The jury is due back in court.

    It is time to incorporate modern proven research into your operation and buy at least the SMR stock.
    My russian breeder stock is instrumentally inseminated with SMR stock.
    Regards,
    Ernie
    Lucas Apiaries
    Ernie
    My websitehttp://bees4u.com/

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    Manitoba Canada
    Posts
    5,992

    Default

    As I was watching, I just could help but think that bee was doing a lot of work trying to take that mite off. Wouldnt it be soo much easier if the others would help!!
    Ian Steppler >> Canadian Beekeeper's Blog
    www.stepplerfarms.com

  7. #7
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Hillsboro, Wisconsin, USA
    Posts
    1,672

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Ian View Post
    As I was watching, I just could help but think that bee was doing a lot of work trying to take that mite off. Wouldnt it be soo much easier if the others would help!!
    Yes, maybe we should breed bees with longer legs! Sort of like that itch I often get in the middle of my back, and I just can't reach it with my arms.

    MM

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Indiana, Clay County
    Posts
    568

    Big Grin bees

    Thanks for sharing; after watching that video , you can easily see how the powered sugar dusting would aid the bees in removing mites.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    Manitoba Canada
    Posts
    5,992

    Default

    >>should breed bees with longer legs

    Exactly what I was thinking!!
    Ian Steppler >> Canadian Beekeeper's Blog
    www.stepplerfarms.com

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    Cracow, Poland
    Posts
    3

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by BEES4U View Post
    It is time to incorporate modern proven research into your operation and buy at least the SMR stock.
    My russian breeder stock is instrumentally inseminated with SMR stock.
    Regards,
    Ernie
    Lucas Apiaries
    I started regressing my bees last year and I'm still looking for my way of doing things right. What is your opinion: is small cell enough to induce the bees to groom and generally co-exist with varroa, or would you recommend SMR / VSH stock?

    I personally tend to distrust instrumental insemination and inbreeding as you can never be sure what negative traits it reinforces alongside the desirable ones. Isn't it better if the bees are local stock, acclimatized to the area? What do you think?

    Regards,
    Ewa (Poland)

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    Manitoba Canada
    Posts
    5,992

    Default

    >>What is your opinion: is small cell enough to induce the bees to groom and generally co-exist with varroa

    Ewa, if I could ask,

    is it the "small cell" that is adding the characteristic of grooming,or is it the actual genetics of the bee that inturn demistrates the act of grooming? I might buy the fact of supressed reproduction of the mite due to cell size and what ever, but I dont think I can buy the claim of the cell size inducing the bees to increase groom ing of the mite.
    Ian Steppler >> Canadian Beekeeper's Blog
    www.stepplerfarms.com

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    Cleveland, Texas
    Posts
    1,378

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Ian View Post
    As I was watching, I just could help but think that bee was doing a lot of work trying to take that mite off. Wouldnt it be soo much easier if the others would help!!
    Ian,

    That's known as "allo-grooming" and some bees do it (Apis cerana is one of them, and probably explains part of their resistance to varroa). I have several feral colonies that I have observed allo-grooming, it really is a hoot to watch, the bee that is getting all the grooming attention from her hivemates really gets a through "going over". You can almost hear her complaining "Aw come on gals, enough already!".
    "The UNKNOWN, huh? That would be SNORBERT ZANGOX over in Waycross."

  13. #13
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    Raleigh, North Carolina
    Posts
    3,598

    Default

    Ian,

    I think if you read here enough you can find suggestions from observations in o-hives that SC bees seem to demonstrate high hygienic tendencies
    you'll notice I used "suggestions" and "seem" liberally
    I'm not aware of any studies suggesting this but there does seem to be some anecdotal evidence of it
    I know I've watch the bees in my o-hive (SC) groom mites off each other but I don't have enough experience to say they do it any more than bees on LC comb

    but on the subject of hygienic bees, I thought this could be accomplished just from selective breeding
    some folks do this test where they kill a patch of brood on a brood comb with liquid nitrogen and then see how much of the dead brood the bees clean up in 24 hours
    if they clean it all up you breed from them
    no II involved
    a little beyond my means but not really that hard to do

    Dave

  14. #14
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    Raleigh, North Carolina
    Posts
    3,598

    Default

    Gene,

    that's interesting
    the bees in my o-hive I watched do this were SMRxRussian
    so it may have nothing to do with SC in my case

    Dave

    [edit]check this out

    http://www.honeybeeworld.com/misc/hygienic.htm

  15. #15
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    Manitoba Canada
    Posts
    5,992

    Default

    >>I know I've watch the bees in my o-hive (SC) groom mites off each other but I don't have enough experience to say they do it any more than bees on LC comb
    >>notice I used "suggestions" and "seem"

    So then I guess we could say its a hygenic trait expressing the grooming behaviour rather than the size of cell the bee developed in,
    I too have hives that I observed to have a grooming behaviour, and they were raised in regular sized foudation.
    Ian Steppler >> Canadian Beekeeper's Blog
    www.stepplerfarms.com

  16. #16
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    VENTURA, California, USA
    Posts
    3,604

  17. #17
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    VENTURA, California, USA
    Posts
    3,604

    Cool Genetics of legs.

    FYI:
    Here is an example of good genetics:

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yNvOPN1LoQ4

    Ernie
    Lucas Apiaries
    Ernie
    My websitehttp://bees4u.com/

  18. #18
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    Cracow, Poland
    Posts
    3

    Default

    [QUOTE=Ian;294091]
    is it the "small cell" that is adding the characteristic of grooming,or is it the actual genetics of the bee

    Ian,
    It seems to me to be both... or either. Genetics surely has some bearing, but I also remember reading here about experiments with regressing and then un-regresing the bees. Dennis Murrell also writes about it on his website: http://www.bwrangler.com/bee/sunr.htm

    When the bees that after regression demostrated hygienic behaviour and could cope with varroa while living on SC comb were put back on LC, there was no mite cleansing or mite biting, in the second season all LC hives required treatment to survive.
    Dennis writes, "Cell size is everything for varroa mite tolerance. The same bees which were mite tolerant when on small cell comb, had no mite tolerance when they were un-regressed on large cell comb."
    If I remember correctly, he experimented with all sorts of US commercially available bees, not necessarily the hygienic stock.

    You can say this isn't scientific research so it isn't reliable enough, but I haven't heard of any more academic research into the influence of SC on hygenic behaviour. Have any of you?

    Regards,
    Ewa

  19. #19
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    Manitoba Canada
    Posts
    5,992

    Default

    Kinda reminds me, of my 2 year old boy. He has a bad cold, and caughs every night this week just before going to sleep. My wife told him rubbing Vics on his feet before bed would make his caugh better. So we did every night for a few nights, it didnt help his caugh as far as I could gather, but my little boy requested his feet to be rubbed with Vics, because he figured it helped.

    If it seemed to help him, I guess it worked,
    Ian Steppler >> Canadian Beekeeper's Blog
    www.stepplerfarms.com

  20. #20
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    Cleveland, Texas
    Posts
    1,378

    Default

    I am just thinking out loud here but, it seems to me that maybe SC bees being slightly smaller might be more successful at reaching the mite on its back with its legs without help from its hivemates as apposed to LC bees. In LC bees with hygienic traits, the help that the bees get from their hivemates may help to equalize this disadvantage. Another possibility is that some of the advantage of hygienic bees may be morphometric (ie slightly longer legs to reach the mites). As I said I am just thinking out loud here, I don't have any data to back any of this up with.
    "The UNKNOWN, huh? That would be SNORBERT ZANGOX over in Waycross."

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
Ads