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Thread: Chilean Queens

  1. #1
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    Default Chilean Queens

    For all you Canadian beekeepers on this fourm, this might post some interest.

    www.oaknookhoney.com/ChileanQueens.html

    www.lynxseismicdata.com/chile/chile.htm
    Ian Steppler >> Canadian Beekeeper's Blog
    www.stepplerfarms.com

  2. #2
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    How much $$ are the Chilean royalty going for?
    John B Jacob www.oldsolbees.com

  3. #3
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    i've seen them offered for $15 some at 17. I was offered some for $11.00 then the guy backed out of the deal after I had reluctantly agrred to 3 of his conditions. Go figure.

    Jean-Marc

  4. #4
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    Ya, they are being brought in to Manitoba here, Mid of May to June, priced at 15-17$/queen. That beats out anything else that would be imported here into Canada.
    I wasnt given any conditions to follow,
    Ian Steppler >> Canadian Beekeeper's Blog
    www.stepplerfarms.com

  5. #5
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    I feel I'm missing something here. What's the advantage of bringing in Chilean queens? Just the jump in timing (Chile is entering winter as Canada is entering summer), or something else in addition?

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kieck View Post
    I feel I'm missing something here. What's the advantage of bringing in Chilean queens? Just the jump in timing (Chile is entering winter as Canada is entering summer), or something else in addition?
    I think I went over the entire website and googled to see if there was something to be found. The web does not mention selection, breeding efforts, and not even a mention of characteristics (honey production, gentleness, etc.) of the queens from Chile. If someone can pass on any beneficial information and a history of these queens I'd be interested in getting couple. But as of now, other than the fact they are from Chile, I don't see what going on either.

  7. #7
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    Just on the face of it I always get a little uncomfortable
    whenever we import any species. I know the honeybee
    came from Europe. I am just saying that caution should
    be exercised lest we let in some negative genetics.

    PS...... I don't like the Australian invasion either.

  8. #8
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    >>I don't like the Australian invasion either.

    The Australian bees sure got a bad rap.

    I import from Hawaii, Zew Zeland, and the US. Now I am from Chile.
    Id say probably the highest risk is from the US California queens.
    Ian Steppler >> Canadian Beekeeper's Blog
    www.stepplerfarms.com

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sundance View Post
    Just on the face of it I always get a little uncomfortable
    whenever we import any species. I know the honeybee
    came from Europe. I am just saying that caution should
    be exercised lest we let in some negative genetics.

    PS...... I don't like the Australian invasion either.

    And where was it that the AHB as we know it come from?
    Ed, KA9CTT profanity is IGNORANCE made audible
    you can`t fix stupid not even with duct tape

  10. #10
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    I'm just curious
    you couldn't import these into the US legally could you?
    I don't want any, I'm just curious about the rules

    Dave

  11. #11
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    So, Ian, why use queens imported from Chile? What advantage do you see in them over queens from New Zealand or Hawaii?

  12. #12
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    >>I am just saying that caution should
    be exercised lest we let in some negative genetics.


    Why is it that you expect these queens to have inferiour genetics? Possibley those beekeepers, have worked to keep thier hives as productive and ALIVE just as we are here in North America. Our beekeepers who visited the queen operations in Chile were quite impressed with the hives strength and precieved perfomances. Thier beekeeping industry is not as developed as North Americas, very little investment is put into thier hives. But in that regards, thier stock selection is narrowed and selection is for the finest and best perfoming, against diseases and mites. Kinda what some here are doing with thier hives, dont you think??

    Bjornbee, becasue of that, there hasnt been any study on thier performances quite yet. Guys here have gotten about 80 or so queens in late last year, too late to test for quality and mite and disease characteristics. But those observations and studdies are to be done. They havnt been done by Chilean beekeepers as far as I know. I dont really think anyone has ever ventured in their direction before. (except for us back in the 80's)

    Never the less, why from Chile?

    >>why use queens imported from Chile? What advantage do you see in them over queens from New Zealand or Hawaii?

    Kieck, I see a huge oportunity getting a queen production industry developed in Chile, comming from a Canadian beekeepers perspective. The queen production industry in Chile has huge potential for developing a market to supply Canadian Beekeepers with early spring queens. Its an industry we can work with, and help incorperate some of the high quality qenetics from breeders here in Canada with Chilean vigour, and resiliant queens to custom mold a line of queens perfect for our conditions. It gives us a place where we can capitalize on the work being done here in Canada.
    OUR breeding programs only allow for a LATE season breeding program to exist. If we can propagete the genetics in Chili, we can supply our beekeepers with what we need, at the exact time we need it.
    The climate of Chili is exaclty a queen breeders dream. Sunny, dry and sunny. It holds all the characteristics of California, except for the cool foggy spells that sometimes pluages the area at times the queens need sun!
    All in cooperation with the Chilean govnt, and beekeeping industry, it could prove to be a very lucrative venture for thier industry, and provide the Candian beekeeping industry with a huge advantage.

    Also, as the importation of Zew Zealand, and Hawaii queens, it gives us more a taste of more diversity of honeybee genetics. Dont discount the Chilean bees quality, might be something underestimated. It seems all so often I here here on this fourm(not mean specifically you Kieck) the concern about narrowing honeybee genetics. Too few lines being propagated, and followed. Just for a moment, think along my open market views here, wouldnt the incorperation of new stock, and new genetics be good for the industry. Bees coming from a part of the world where disease has been managed somewhat naturally, and secluded from the boom and bust economic pressures of the world. They might have something as precious as the Russian programs being preformed currently. Time will tell, and the possibilities building on those bees are exciting.
    Last edited by Ian; 02-19-2008 at 04:25 PM.
    Ian Steppler >> Canadian Beekeeper's Blog
    www.stepplerfarms.com

  13. #13
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    " Why is it that you expect these queens to have inferiour genetics?"

    Inferior is relative...... AHB are in reality, superior bees in most
    respects (other than human perspectives).

    At my age, I have come to learn to expect, the unexpected. Not
    being cautious has led to multiple horror stories in the plant and
    animal world. All with good intent, and all with their own level
    of "caution".

  14. #14
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    >>Inferior is relative...... AHB are in reality, superior bees in most
    respects (other than human perspectives).

    These arnt Africaized bees, they are our good old well known European type The Mountains help with the problem in Argentina.

    >>Inferior is relative...... AHB are in reality, superior bees in most
    respects (other than human perspectives).


    But also , lets look at reality. Much of what we grow in North America has been imported. there has been huge advantage brought to us by allowing such to happen.
    Ian Steppler >> Canadian Beekeeper's Blog
    www.stepplerfarms.com

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kieck View Post
    So, Ian, why use queens imported from Chile? What advantage do you see in them over queens from New Zealand or Hawaii?
    Or over queens raised in the US, or Canada. Why risk another infestation of whatever, or rely on whomever from wherever, to grow the queens we need. We have good stocks here already. Is it just a timing issue?

  16. #16
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    >>We have good stocks here already

    Michael, its easy to say when you have access to all the genetic programs currently being performed in the US, with out any restrictions.
    Ian Steppler >> Canadian Beekeeper's Blog
    www.stepplerfarms.com

  17. #17
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    The timing I understand. I suspected as much, and it makes some sense to me. Queens produced later in the season seem superior to queens produced early in the season, and queens from Chile would be produced late in their season and very early in Canada's season. Makes sense.

    I wonder how Chilean queens would compare to overwintered queens in Canada, though?

    As far as the "genetic diversity" aspects, I've been the one saying that I'm not sure that we're suffering from as great a loss of diversity as has been suggested by others. I'm still not convinced by that one. So the "narrowing of genetic diversity" is not really an issue, in my opinion. (For comparison, look at AHB; virtually all AHB in South and North America are descendants of 26 colonies, yet they seem to be suffering no effects of a lack of genetic diversity.)

    Canada doesn't allow importation of queens from the U. S.?

  18. #18
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    >>Canada doesn't allow importation of queens from the U. S.?

    Two operations in California have permits to ship North. Stracten, and Oliverez.

    >>I wonder how Chilean queens would compare to overwintered queens in Canada, though?

    Thats a good question. But lets not forget costs. If you can find someone that will be able to over winter queens for less than $15, Id be supprised.
    There are some guys throughout the west here that do a good job of it. Using modified equipment and wintering something like 8 queens in the size of a standard box. Takes alot of time and care to sucessfully winter them into April. It works, it has its advantages, but it has its challenges. Id say buying from Zew Zealand or Hawaii buys alot of time to do other types of beekeeping activities through out the year.
    Ian Steppler >> Canadian Beekeeper's Blog
    www.stepplerfarms.com

  19. #19
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    Default I find it ironic

    That the same people importing these queens from Chile were the first to organize a Manitoba QUEEN breeding association, to breed Manitoba QUEENS.They also managed to get thousands of dollars out of the Manitoba Beekeepers Association in the name of research FOR queen breeding in manitoba.There agenda seems to have changed.

  20. #20
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    >>There agenda seems to have changed.


    Bringing in queens from Chili will not hinder the work being done within the Associations. Thier work is still focused on producing the best queen for our climate. The potential of the Manitoba provinial queen production industry has its limitations, and it has probably worked to its full potential already. Queens comming in from Chile are going to producers who would buy queen off shore anyway.

    Where I see the potential with Chilean queen production, is to get our "Manitoba select" genetics propagating down there, to be able to sell back into our provence, selling to the beekeeper who want that early queen, who would otherwise buy an off shore queen, and then have the ability to have a choice of locally selected stock.

    I truely see potential here, "IF" that is the direction the association is taking, I am not one of the current working members. Alot of this talk of mine still depends on the cooperation with the Chilean government. They are real tight on importation of bees.

    If this is the direction they association is taking, would you then expect the association to re-pay the money? Do you not feel they have spent the money into current worth while breeding projects?
    Ian Steppler >> Canadian Beekeeper's Blog
    www.stepplerfarms.com

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