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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    Cuyahoga Falls, Ohio USA
    Posts
    312

    Default Buying a tablesaw...some input

    Hello

    I plan on buying a tablesaw. It will mainly be used to build beehives. I need the tablesaw to be able to cut Rabbet, Crosscut, Ripsaw, Miter and some Mortise and Tenon work..small scale.

    I do not want to spend over $350.00 and would like a new one. What type should I look for? Options?

    thx

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    Atlanta, GA
    Posts
    174

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by MrGreenThumb View Post
    Hello

    I plan on buying a tablesaw. It will mainly be used to build beehives. I need the tablesaw to be able to cut Rabbet, Crosscut, Ripsaw, Miter and some Mortise and Tenon work..small scale.

    I do not want to spend over $350.00 and would like a new one. What type should I look for? Options?

    thx
    It'll cost you $1,500 for the contractor model (soon to be introduced) but you'll always be known as Mr. GreenThumb if you buy the SawStop model which pretty much cannot cut your finger off. Check out the demonstration video at sawstop.com where they TRY to cut a hot dog with the saw - they can't!

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    Stillwater, OK
    Posts
    36

    Default

    Get the biggest *table* you can find. . .and watch garage sales. If you can find an old, heavy belt driven saw at a garage sale, you'll be quite pleased.

    Edit: By "table" I mean just that. The little "tablesaws" that Lowe's sells work fine. . .as long as you don't need more than about two (2) feet of table space.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Dec 1999
    Location
    DuPage County, Illinois USA
    Posts
    9,419

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Northern VA USA
    Posts
    137

    Default

    FWIW, my opinion is that you cannot buy a good table saw for $350. You will do yourself a disservice in the long run. I would recommend buying a nice used table saw with a cast iron top.

    The second piece of info you need...do not buy cheap blades.

    Craigslist is often a good place to keep an eye out for good used tools. Check your area for any local woodworking clubs that might have members posted their saw for sale. Or even check stores such as Woodcraft and inquire about any local woodworkers trying to unload a saw.

    Might take a little patience, but it'll be worth it.

    Matt

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    St. Albans, Vermont
    Posts
    5,368

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Matt Guyrd View Post
    FWIW, my opinion is that you cannot buy a good table saw for $350. You will do yourself a disservice in the long run. I would recommend buying a nice used table saw with a cast iron top. Matt
    I agree with Matt. I bought my saw in 1972. It's a Rockwell contractor's model...with a
    V-belt, not the cogged belt. Some time after that, Rockwell was bought by Delta.

    Delta has a web site, and I'm still able to buy parts for my old saw. I've built thousands of bee boxes, bottoms, and covers. Built all the windows in the original section of my house, and all the cabinets, etc. I've found it to be an excellent saw over the years. I looked at new saws recently. I'd like to have two, so I can leave one setup with dado blades, and the other with saw blade for ripping and crosscutting. The new saws seem too big, and would make me bend over too much to be close enough to the work.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Apr 2003
    Location
    Greenville, TX, USA
    Posts
    4,374

    Default

    A used Rockwell/Delta contractor is your best bet. The Model 10 was the best of them. The next purchase should be a Biesemeyer on clone fence. Watch Craigslist in your area and check pawn shops. Winter is when a lot of them get sold, then when the weather warms they get re-bought.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Location
    Murphy, NC, USA
    Posts
    67

    Default

    I've been using Dewalt tools for years with no complaints. They make a model no. DW745 that is carried at Lowe's and Home Depot that is in your price range. If all you'll be using it for is making hives it will do all you need. They just came out with this saw recently, and the only setback I see is that it has the max rip is 16". This is only a problem if you rip your plywood for your telescoping covers on it, as it is around 19" X 21". I have the model no. DW744X which has a max rip of 24 1/2" . This is nice if you have someone to help you, as you can rip a sheet of plywood in half. If you've never tried to rip a full sheet of plywood by yourself, don't. It's much easier to strike your lines and rip it with a circular saw.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    Ludington, Michigan
    Posts
    638

    Default saw

    my rigid is AMERICAN MADE, very strong and solid

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Northern VA USA
    Posts
    137

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by danno View Post
    my rigid is AMERICAN MADE, very strong and solid
    Really?

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Location
    Murphy, NC, USA
    Posts
    67

    Default

    I have no complaints with Ridgid tools either. I have a Ridgid Joiner/Planer I use to make my rabbets and it does a great job.

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Northern VA USA
    Posts
    137

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Matt Guyrd View Post
    Really?
    Let me clarify...I like Ridgid tools too...just questioning the "AMERICAN MADE" part.

    Regarding Ridgid table saws, if you can get your hands on one of the Ridgid Contractor saws with the full-size cast iron top, that would be a good choice.

    Matt

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    Ludington, Michigan
    Posts
    638

    Default saw

    A couple of the nice features of the portable Rigid is it breaks down so if I need it up at the barn I can load it in my pickup and on nice days I can wheel it outside the shop
    Last edited by danno; 02-15-2008 at 12:21 PM.

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Location
    Tucson, Arizona, USA
    Posts
    5,346

    Default

    Here is a link to a review that helped me to choose my portable tablesaw.

    http://www.taunton.com/finehomebuild...px?ac=ts&ra=fp
    48 years - 50 hives - TF
    Joseph Clemens -- Website Under Constructioni

  15. #15
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    Cuyahoga Falls, Ohio USA
    Posts
    312

    Default

    Can the DW745 be used with dado blades? I looked at specs and not see the option listed.

    thx

  16. #16
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Location
    Tucson, Arizona, USA
    Posts
    5,346

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by MrGreenThumb View Post
    Can the DW745 be used with dado blades? I looked at specs and not see the option listed.

    thx
    http://www.forums.woodnet.net/ubbthr...lapsed&sb=3&o=
    48 years - 50 hives - TF
    Joseph Clemens -- Website Under Constructioni

  17. #17
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    Battle Ground , Washington, USA
    Posts
    752

    Default

    I bought a powermatic tablesaw, It came with a biesmeyer fence. Love it. I was undecided between full tablesaw and kinda portable. From what I read the bosch had the most power in the "mini table saws". I went for the not that moveable saw and am happy. I dont move it much, If I did it over might of spent a couple of hundred more and got the cabnet style."very heavy"

    Good luck, Get a good dado blade....
    I'm not tense, Just terribly, terribly alert!

  18. #18
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Location
    Loganville, GA
    Posts
    2,172

    Default

    Your $350 budget just ain't going to get it. You should go hock your car and get a BIG un so everybody will be happy!
    "Success is not final, failure is not fatal: it is the courage to continue that counts." Winston Churchill

  19. #19
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Sparta, Tennessee
    Posts
    2,136

    Default

    I have a fairly inexpensive budget table saw, a Craftsman which is light weight and belt driven. I have a very good carbide blade on it which makes a huge difference. It takes me longer to make precision cuts, because I have to measure everything twice and go slow to make sure I cut accurately along my markings. I make my boxes, covers, bottom-boards, reducers, etc. Someday I hope to get a really high end table-saw but am grateful for the saw that I have.

    Thanks for the tips, I'll keep an eye out at garage sales...

  20. #20
    Join Date
    Apr 2003
    Location
    Greenville, TX, USA
    Posts
    4,374

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