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  1. #21
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    Brewster, NY USA
    Posts
    52

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    I made a sled for doing high volume box joints. You can see it here and here.

    I've been asked a couple of times for plans for this. Unfortunately, I tend to build things out of my head so I don't have any.
    Whatever you believe you can or cannot do, you're right. - RusticElementBees.com

  2. #22
    Join Date
    Apr 2003
    Location
    Greenville, TX, USA
    Posts
    4,366

    Default

    Interesting, but without the accuracy of your mill to do the layout, you'd never get it dialed in. The advantage of the loose pin board is you can tune the joint until it fits. After that, you leave it setup. Just hang it on a nail until you need it again.

  3. #23
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    Northeast Missouri
    Posts
    93

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    Quote Originally Posted by Ross View Post
    I'm bringing this one back to the top for the newbees.

    Since spring is fast approaching and a lot of new beekeepers come here looking for help, I thought I would start a thread with ideas that work for me. They are free to anyone that wants to use them.

    Bottom Board construction
    http://www.myoldtools.com/Bees/botto...ottomboard.htm

    Frame construction jig (yes, that one)
    http://www.myoldtools.com/Bees/framejig/framejig.htm

    Foundationless frames -- cutting the top bars
    http://www.myoldtools.com/Bees/frames/

    A couple of nucs
    http://www.myoldtools.com/Bees/nuc/

    A sled for cutting box joints (there are tons out there on the web)
    http://www.myoldtools.com/Bees/sled/

    Open feeder (hint, place gravel, sawdust, sponge, etc in the bowl to prevent drowning.
    http://www.myoldtools.com/Bees/beefeeder.jpg

    Queen cell incubator
    http://www.myoldtools.com/Bees/incubator/
    You"re are a gem, I am making some of your bottom boards now. Thanks for the ideas and plans.

  4. #24
    Join Date
    Apr 2003
    Location
    Greenville, TX, USA
    Posts
    4,366

    Default

    I didn't orginate all of them. The incubator bar came from a member here several years ago. I'm not sure if they are still around. Same with the frame assembly jig (everybody should build one). The box joint jig is pretty similar to dozens on the woodworking sites. The bottom board I worked out, and I'm still working on it trying to simplify.

  5. #25
    Join Date
    Apr 2003
    Location
    Greenville, TX, USA
    Posts
    4,366

    Default

    Spring has sprung, time to get to work....

  6. #26
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Liberty, Maine
    Posts
    197

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Ross View Post
    Spring has sprung, time to get to work....
    Just was downstairs working on a box joint jig. I can't finish is though has my new stack dado set didn't come with shims and I can't get it zeroed in to 3/4". Yeah, I'm being picky but I can't stand sloppy joints.

    Who makes a dado set that doesn't cut 3/4" anyway?

    Anyway, shims are on the way.

    K

  7. #27
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    Raleigh, North Carolina
    Posts
    3,598

    Default

    >>Who makes a dado set that doesn't cut 3/4" anyway?

    umm?? China maybe

    good luck on your boxes

    Dave

  8. #28
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Location
    Boston, Georgia
    Posts
    466

    Default

    I use an egg incubator:

    http://www.eggcartons.com/product-ex...ncubator_2362N

    You can take an old couch cushion: Cut the outer cover off, Saturate it in water, Freeze it, then drill holes while its frozen.

    It takes a few tweaks to get the temp right. I put a hygrometer in mine so I know what the humidity is.
    I am holding on to the hope I have inside... Kutless

  9. #29
    Join Date
    Apr 2003
    Location
    Greenville, TX, USA
    Posts
    4,366

    Default

    Box joints don't have to be 3/4", they just have to be a match. You can make the any dimension you want, just cut the pin to match.

  10. #30
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Liberty, Maine
    Posts
    197

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Ross View Post
    Box joints don't have to be 3/4", they just have to be a match. You can make the any dimension you want, just cut the pin to match.
    I know, last year I made a box with this dado set and was just adjusted for them being off a bit. I didn't like my jig last year so I made a sled this time and want to make it right. That and I need true 3/4" dados for non-beekeeping projects. :-P

    China, probably. It's a Delta set, wasn't the most expensive by any means but cuts really nice.

    K

  11. #31
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Location
    Brenham, Texas
    Posts
    208

    Default

    Ross,

    I set out to build a couple of screened bottom boards following your design yesterday afternoon. It took about two hours to finish two of them and I am NOT a carpenter.

    I got motivated and built 8 more in the next two hours.

    While that may not be cost effective, by the time you figure in the shipping, I am VERY happy with what I did.

    Besides, I used exterior wood glue and 14 - 2 1/4 inch wood screws on each bottom board so I know that this is a lot better and sturdier than the ones you order from the supply houses. I know.....I tend to overdo. I also put 4 coats of oil-based paint on everything! I am building these for my grandchildren to use when they retire.

    The only thing that I don't really like about the design is the way the wire has to be stapled to the side of the railing instead of straight down on the base.

    You notice, however, that that didn't stop me from making 10 of them and probably more as soon as I get some time......whatever "time" is!

    Thanks for sharing. I have been looking for a screened bottom board that has a slide-in bottom for when I need it.

    Fuzzybeekeeper

  12. #32
    Join Date
    Apr 2003
    Location
    Greenville, TX, USA
    Posts
    4,366

    Default

    I have another simplier design I'm building and using now. I'll try to put together a quick page on it soon.

  13. #33
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Location
    Land O Lakes, FL
    Posts
    264

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    Ross
    I used your idea with 2x4s to make some screen bottom boards with a sticky board. It appeared to be going well until assembly. The boards just were not straight enough. I did 45 degree angles at the back corners and some were not even close. Then the board across the front caused spacing issues...

    So next time, I think I will joint and plane them to be straight and adjust the dimensions.

  14. #34
    Join Date
    Apr 2003
    Location
    Greenville, TX, USA
    Posts
    4,366

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    I never have to plane it, but I do select for reasonably straight sticks. I don't do 45s, those are for picture frames. That's why I use all straight cuts. The only critical dimension is the length of the front and back cross bars. Some warping over the 2 foot length shouldn't cause a problem as the sides are 3/4" on each side, allowing for an inch and a half of variance before it doesn't serve its purpose.

  15. #35
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    Russellville, Alabama
    Posts
    112

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    I build my bottom boards somewhat like the one you show. Rather than cutting the grove for a sticky pad, I remove the rest of the 2x4 and put a solid board on the bottom. I then take a flat alum. pan (disposible) and glue it to a thin board ( I use a politician sign) cut to slide in the bottom board. I pour veg. oil in the pan and it works great for killing mites and SHB. Just make sure the hive is level.
    Michael
    2nd year beek, 3 hives!

  16. #36
    Join Date
    Apr 2003
    Location
    Greenville, TX, USA
    Posts
    4,366

    Default

    Good idea. I have never actually used the groove at all. It just seemed like a good idea at the time.

  17. #37
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Location
    Galt, CA
    Posts
    881

    Default

    Just wanted to say thanks for the great post, I have been going back and forth between making my own stuff or buying it unassymbled and finishing it myself. I have enjoyed assymbling my frames so far and think that building everything from scratch might just add to the fun of this hobby. Little pride never hurt anyone right?

  18. #38
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    Issaquah,WA,USA
    Posts
    2,344

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Batman View Post
    I have enjoyed assymbling my frames so far and think that building everything from scratch might just add to the fun of this hobby. Little pride never hurt anyone right?
    I am having alot of fun building top, bottom, supers and more hives from scratch. I bought a bunch of pre-cut supers 6 for 41 bucks. I can't make them that cheap but, it is more fun cutting them myself. Had to spend 100 on a set of dateo blades, plus nails for the nail gun clamps etc but, I will use them for something else someday.

  19. #39
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Location
    Land O Lakes, FL
    Posts
    264

    Default

    I too enjoy building from scratch but I only do tops, bottoms and nucs now. I can't get the wood cheap enough to make doing supers and deeps worth while especially since I recently found a close enough source to avoid shipping costs.
    Last edited by Bizzybee; 06-08-2009 at 09:48 AM. Reason: remove quote

  20. #40
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    Issaquah,WA,USA
    Posts
    2,344

    Default

    My club has a source in Eastern WA that is about 6-7 bucks a super. I can make a super with wood from HD for 7-8 bucks. So it is not that much different but, it keeps me away from annoying the wifey for a bit. And the honey doo's.
    Last edited by EastSideBuzz; 06-08-2009 at 12:01 PM.

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