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  1. #21
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    Lindsay Ontario
    Posts
    47

    Default non robbing

    Yes this is true, ccd boxes sit around unrobbed
    When the worms come, much delayed there is only 1 or 2
    Earwigs are immune, unaffected by ccd
    At least they are not repelled

    SoCal, Larry would you tell me if you see these physical
    symptoms in infected hives?

    STR (sore tummy rub)
    ankle rub
    (rear) feet too close

    in any reasonable numbers?

    Socal it sounds like the russians and carnis are
    somewhat resistant? Are they in same yard?

    Larry, a hunch, dust frames with sulphur powder
    to disinfect, worth a test and I'm sure you have
    the frames

    After all you are both in CA, I'm in the frozen north

    dave

  2. #22
    Join Date
    Nov 2003
    Location
    Camarillo, Ca. USA
    Posts
    17

    Default non robbing

    Dthompson, The Russians and Carni's are in the same breeder queen yard. As for resistance, I'm not sure if its the low mite counts and a vastly more hygenic behavior or something else. A higher might count in the fall/winter seems to be a precursor for destruction. Mites don't kill bees alone, however I do believe mites to be a most able VECTOR in the spread of most viral, fungal and bacterial infections.

    You did bring up sulphur? good point,I am doing some tests with sulphur, but in a syrup feed.
    Will also be using colloidal zinc, copper and silver in syrup feed. all of which are very good fungicides. But for frame treatments, it looks like fumigation or irradiation as a best bet.

    Wayne.

  3. #23
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    floyd county, georgia
    Posts
    53

    Smile additional information

    When I was cleaning the hive out, the inside felt moist and damp. When I took the top super off there was green mold growing inbetween the supers. Not much just an area about 1 inch. now earlier this fall I placed bales of pinestraw both behind and in front of each hive to help cut down on the wind that blew through each hive. We live on a mountain top and the wind gusts are high and I use sceenbottom boards. Now on this hive the front bale was up under the front apron tightly and the back had a 2 inch gap. THis was the only hove that the bale fit tightly. I'm beginning to think that the lack of air flow had a large part to play. We have had a warm wet, thanks for the rain, winter. Now for the frames I will toss them straight out. But the brood box I would like to keep. Does anyone know where I can get the 80% acid to use. I try to do thing naturally and really do not want to use chemicals and that does include antibiotics, so i'll try thymol this year. Thanks for all the help, does anyone have anymore thoughts?

    jeannie

  4. #24
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    Lindsay Ontario
    Posts
    47

    Default

    Wayne: I had thought to try collodial silver, its not
    just a fungicide. Also consider benzoic acid -- cranberry
    IMO ccd does not like vinegar. ie instead of H2O use vinegar(5%)
    (maybe the odor???)
    After thinking about it yes my Russians are a bit more
    resistant, show the infection but seem less bothered

    Jeannie: You could save the frames with bleach
    Tall bucket 3/4 full 50:50, soak each end 1d
    Flame the boxes
    For me acetic acid has been hard to find
    or very expensive

    dave

  5. #25
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    Manitoba Canada
    Posts
    5,479

    Default

    >>LSPender is right about the not robbing thing. Have several Italian colonies that "went away" douring the last rain, about ten days worth.the boxes, frames pollen and honey are still in the yard, and no robbing at all, it's been in the 80s the last week and still no robbing. Something is keeping the other bees away

    Is that a symtom of Nosema C or A? Have you had left over bees, equipment tested for the presence of Nosema? Perhaps last years tests, something to lead you to the conclusion that it is the Noseam C or A repelling your bees from the dead outs?

    We can keep talking ourselves round and round about, if we choose, but it will get us no where. Bring observations and opinions to the talbe as such, and let the science and studdied observations lead us to the facts.
    Ian Steppler >> Canadian Beekeeper's Blog
    www.stepplerfarms.com

  6. #26
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    43,406

    Default

    >Does anyone know where I can get the 80% acid to use.

    From a photo supply store (if any still exist). It's what is used for Stop Bath.
    Michael Bush bushfarms.com/bees.htm "Everything works if you let it." ThePracticalBeekeeper.com 40y 200h 37yTF

  7. #27
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    Knoxville, TN
    Posts
    1,933

    Default

    Jeannie: You could save the frames with bleach
    Tall bucket 3/4 full 50:50, soak each end 1d
    I've been trying to find a study that shows that bleach will
    kill Nosema spores. Seems like it would, but would feel
    better about taking the time to do it knowing that it would.

    An Important thing to note however is that if your bleach
    concentration is too high, this is known to NOT work against
    other spores. The bleach has to be dilute to break the surface
    of the spore. 5% solution is the number I've heard to use for
    general sterilization.

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