Results 1 to 7 of 7
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Evansville, IN, USA
    Posts
    2,837

    Default Wanted: Damaged Mites

    Over the years, I have counted a lot of Varroa mites

    Never, not once, have I found any that looked like they had been damaged in any way.
    Some are dead, some alive, but never damaged.

    I would like to see a sample of "damaged mites".

    Would someone like to collect a few, maybe place them between clear "book tape" and mail them to me?

    Please reply by Private Mail.

    Thanx

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Latrobe, PA
    Posts
    377

    Default

    Dave W,

    I'm interested in what you want with them. I wish all of them were damaged to extent that they were dead!!

    Tanya

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Evansville, IN, USA
    Posts
    2,837

    Default

    Sr. Tanya . . .

    Guess I'm nuts but . . .
    I just want to SEE a mite that has been damaged by a bee(s) in the process of removal.

    I have lots of mites of my "own" (some under each arm, some in my hair ), but they are never damaged. I guess they have just fallen off on their own, or died of old age.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    46,782

    Default

    Last I looked I couldn't find one mite. I'll try again in the spring and see what I can find for you.
    Michael Bush bushfarms.com/bees.htm "Everything works if you let it." ThePracticalBeekeeper.com 40y 200h 37yTF

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Location
    Western Pennsylvania
    Posts
    2,071

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Dave W View Post
    I would like to see a sample of "damaged mites".
    Thanx
    My friend Rodger sent me this link awhile back.
    We occasionally discuss observations with ferals
    and grooming behaviors.
    Hope it helps.

    http://www.kilty.demon.co.uk/beekeeping/improvement.htm

    I also have an interesting article from the results of Rodgers study
    on what he termed ‘compression’ and it's influence on grooming.
    behavior,,, If I can still locate it, I will send it.

    In looking at Rodgers compression results and it’s affects on mite
    fall and grooming ie: increased damaged mites. I proposed a
    theory back to him based on my observations with open air
    feral bee nests:
    It is plausible that the screened bottom boards mode of
    action is, that it creates this compression in the colony and
    thus increases grooming behavior. And the popular belief
    that the mode of action is mites falling through the mesh
    and not able to return, actually NOT the real reason for their
    effectiveness, but instead, the increased compression the mode
    of action. Also, observations suggest, this compression Rodger
    describes exists in elongated type feral bee nests, and may be
    a contributing factor in their mite suppression, In my opinion.

    Best Wishes
    Joe

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Evansville, IN, USA
    Posts
    2,837

    Default

    Joe . . .

    Thanx for the info. Photos were very interesting

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Apr 2000
    Location
    Birmingham, West Midlands, UK
    Posts
    751

    Default

    My bees originated with nucs I bought from James. I've seen pupae being removed, as he describes, and I've experienced the biting behaviour many times. They grab a hair and pull, and it's surprisingly painful. It's very easy to see whether pupae are being removed. An area of newly capped cells should show a good solid pattern, as normal. Then a few days later, some cappings will be removed, revealing pupae at the pink eye stage (about the 14th day). After a few days, depending on the number of 'spare' bees present over and above the number needed to service the brood, these will be removed, either on one piece, or by chewing them away. This will then leave the older capped brood looking like a case of pepperpot brood.

    One thing I haven't yet done is put a lens on the dead mites; I'll have a look during the year.
    RSBrenchley@aol.com
    Birmingham UK

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
Ads