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  1. #1
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Bow, NH
    Posts
    93

    Default a clean break for wedges

    What's the choice of tool out there to get a top wedge to snap out cleanly? I've tried scoring with a utility blade (pretty good result) and a wide chisel (almost, but not quite as good). Of course no matter what you use, there's always some slivers left that must be scraped or planed away. Never a clean break; at least for me.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    Lincolnton Ga. USA.
    Posts
    1,725

    Default

    I just pop mine out with my fingers or a screw driver, never worried about popping them out clean, when I wedge it back in with foundation the Bosch staple gun will take care of any unclean strips I might have left.
    Ted

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    St. Albans, Vermont
    Posts
    5,252

    Default

    I gave up on wedges, and now use grooved top bars and hot wax.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Apr 2003
    Location
    Greenville, TX, USA
    Posts
    4,329

    Default

    fingers most of the time. Occasional wild grain will irritate you.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Location
    Lyons, CO
    Posts
    3,027

    Default

    Yeah, just don't worry about it. A quick scrape with a hive tool will get rough stuff off if it bothers you, but the bees don't seem to care; just staple/brad it in place.
    Bees, brews and fun
    in Lyons, CO

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Sparta, Tennessee
    Posts
    2,130

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Ben Brewcat View Post
    Yeah, just don't worry about it. A quick scrape with a hive tool will get rough stuff off if it bothers you, but the bees don't seem to care; just staple/brad it in place.
    I agree Ben, I just use the hive tool and scrape the rough stuff off. Works for me. For whatever reason, I do like to have a tight fit and so I scrape them down.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Location
    Oxford, Kansas
    Posts
    1,988

    Default

    I pop them off with my fingers then run a pocket knife over the edge to take it down

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    45,408

    Default

    I quit breaking them out and just wax the foundation in the groove with a wax tube fastener. But before I started doing that, I used to use a pocket knife.
    Michael Bush bushfarms.com/bees.htm "Everything works if you let it." ThePracticalBeekeeper.com 40y 200h 37yTF

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Location
    Jackson, MO
    Posts
    1,858

    Default

    I use a utility knife, then a hive tool to scrape the burr left behind. Then I start waxing my plastic pierco-style all-in-one frames.

    Grant
    Jackson, MO http://www.25hives.homestead.com
    Beekeeping With Twenty-five Hives: https://www.createspace.com/4152725

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Location
    North Carolina
    Posts
    581

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by coondogger View Post
    What's the choice of tool out there to get a top wedge to snap out cleanly? I've tried scoring with a utility blade (pretty good result) and a wide chisel (almost, but not quite as good). Of course no matter what you use, there's always some slivers left that must be scraped or planed away. Never a clean break; at least for me.
    Buy Kelley frames. I am amazed how clean the break is on these frames. When I used Dadant frames I had the same problems you describe. I use a utility knife that is used to cut carpet.

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Location
    Tucson, Arizona, USA
    Posts
    5,300

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Michael Palmer View Post
    I gave up on wedges, and now use grooved top bars and hot wax.
    I agree with Michael Palmer - whenever I use wax foundation or wax starter strips I just wax them into the groove in the top bar - when I use plastic foundation (even that cut out of all-plastic frames), it just snaps into the top and bottom grooves. Top bars with wedges are so much more difficult to use. They are also extremely difficult and time-consuming, especially if you ever develop the need to reuse them.
    48 years - 50 hives - TF
    Joseph Clemens -- Website Under Constructioni

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