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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Bangor, PA
    Posts
    24

    Default What kind of bees?? These kind of bees

    I'm very, very new to this and everyone talks about Italian and Russian Queens and so forth. My question is, when I find a wild hive like the monster I found last year in N.J., what kind of bees are they?? Are all bees from Europe or were there bees that were always in the US?? Maybee a dumb question, but I have to know.

    Thanks


    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5xRtH2LO7vY

    That's the same kind of hive I found except 5 times the size at least! But right out in the open like that...
    Last edited by pauvil; 01-31-2008 at 09:13 AM. Reason: added link

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    Salem, Oregon
    Posts
    942

    Wild Question!

    Actually, the wild hive that you captured is no wilder than any other managed hives in the area.
    Where ever honey bee hives are present, there will be hollow trees or old shed walls that will become homes from swarms cast.
    The genus is always apis, and the species: melifera, the race is whatever the beekeeper last purchaced or bred.
    To identify the race, grab a senior beekeeper in your area and give a look.
    I have exactly ONE hive more than you.
    That makes my opinion beyond question.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Bangor, PA
    Posts
    24

    Default

    I guess my question is: are there "American Bees"? The hive I found was big and it was about 3 feet off the ground and maybee 6ft. tall and 4ft. wide with a ton of comb right in the open. The bees were very gentle as I was able to sit right in there and eat a little comb without getting stung once. I'm asking because Instead of buying bees for my new hive I'd like to try to capture a swarm. Any thoughts???

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Bangor, PA
    Posts
    24

    Default

    couldn't edit: I know that there are no known bee keepers in the area and as I said, this hive was out in the open, not in a tree or house or anything, built on the outsid of a small tree.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    Pineville Missouri
    Posts
    222

    Big Grin

    WELL DARN !!!!! There is the start for you . Local , hardy and free , nothing better

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    Volga, SD
    Posts
    2,790

    Default

    All honey bees (Apis mellifera) were introduced to North America by human activities.

    As far as "known" beekeepers in N. J., I suspect even if no beekeepers are registered in the area, someone is or has been keeping bees within flying range of this unmanaged colony you found. And the fact that the honeycomb is apparently exposed (you said "on the outside of a small tree") suggests that these bees may not have been there very long. I'm not sure how cold that area gets in winter, but I would question whether an exposed colony like that could overwinter successfully if temperatures drop below freezing for more than a few days at a time.

    If they're still there in the spring, I say take 'em!

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