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  1. #21
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    Apr 2005
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    College Station, Texas
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    casually it would seem to me that since honeybee races in america were imported to the us of a over a fairly long period of time this should suggest that there would only be insignificant (if that?) indiviudals that actually represent pure (not hybridized) stock. secondly since european honeybee originated out of africa in what is now though to be three migrations with each period punctunated by the hammer and anvil of natural selection (and a reduction in genetic diversity) that there should be signicantly more genetic diversity represented within the african honeybee than their european cousins.

  2. #22
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
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    Perkasie, PA
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    1,998

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    Quote Originally Posted by tecumseh View Post
    casually it would seem to me that since honeybee races in america were imported to the us of a over a fairly long period of time this should suggest that there would only be insignificant (if that?) indiviudals that actually represent pure (not hybridized) stock. secondly since european honeybee originated out of africa in what is now though to be three migrations with each period punctunated by the hammer and anvil of natural selection (and a reduction in genetic diversity) that there should be signicantly more genetic diversity represented within the african honeybee than their european cousins.
    Well, Africa seems to have quite a few trinomial named races of bees, which might be an indicator of African diversity. Unfortunately, we mostly seemed to have imported only aggressive strains into the U.S. I find it interesting that humans also had three supposed out-of africa events. Maybe they were related to similar climatic events.

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