Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 20 of 29
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    New York, USA
    Posts
    73

    Default How Much To Sell Honey For?

    I was wondering on how much to sell honey for. I just built my hive and am now thinking ahead. Thank You!
    BeeSilly

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    berkshire county MA
    Posts
    1,472

    Default good to see you're optimistic

    Beesilly, Cool name. It's nice to see you are optimistic. A lot of people will say don't expect to get any honey the first year and you can't really make much at this. I had the same attitude as you my first year and I think it made a world of differrence. What's the use of trying something if you don't intend to succeed?
    We keep around 150 lbs for our own use and sell any surplus above and beyond that, which is usually a few hundred pounds.
    We've created our own little niche market here and can easily sell all we have at $6 per pound. Right now it's all word of mouth and at the farmstand where we have hives
    There are a lot of variables, probably the biggest being what kind of market exists already in your area and how much time and effort you want to put into selling, and how you promote yourself. I'm passionate about my bees and it shows when I talk to people. I'll PM you with more.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Johnston, South Carolina, USA
    Posts
    554

    Default

    Here we go again! There has been a lot discusion on this last year... but it's a good topic, 'cuz prices have fluctuated and always will.

    I sell my honey by the pint, last year it was $6.50 but the drought has pushed it up to $7.00 for the upcoming year. I add a $1.00 onto that price for chunk honey, and than I sell quarts at $13.00ea.

    But that's in SC, if you take a look at a national honey pricing chart (ABJ, or Bee Culture) you'll find prices varry all over the country!

    -Nathanael
    Beaches' Bee-Haven Apiary http://beachesbeehaven.com
    Aiken Beekeepers Association http://aikenbeekeepers.org

  4. #4
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Johnston, South Carolina, USA
    Posts
    554

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by berkshire bee View Post
    Beesilly, Cool name. It's nice to see you are optimistic. A lot of people will say don't expect to get any honey the first year and you can't really make much at this. I had the same attitude as you my first year and I think it made a world of differrence. What's the use of trying something if you don't intend to succeed?
    I agree 100% berkshire... Our first year we started a 3lb. package in April, and had a whole deep super of surplus honey by Fall!
    Beaches' Bee-Haven Apiary http://beachesbeehaven.com
    Aiken Beekeepers Association http://aikenbeekeepers.org

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    VENTURA, California, USA
    Posts
    3,604

    Default Honey Economics 101

    PLEASE DO A COST OF PRODUCTION ANALYSIS.
    Cost of containers, labels ---
    Glass is nice. But, plastic bounces.
    Sell a top quality product.
    Sell to the local allergies group
    Consider pollen sales.
    See what your competetion is locally.
    I sell pollen to a local feed store because local dog owners seem to think that fido feels better when he is given local pollen.
    Consider comb honey .
    Check out your local ethnic demographics. A special holliday requires special honey. A red honey will sell rapidly in certain religious communities!
    Sell to your local bakeries and local restaurants.
    Buy some product liability insurance.
    How much time can you spend on sales?
    If you make some profit spend it on your honey 1st and the bees 2nd!
    Regards,
    Ernie

  6. #6

    Default

    It's pretty routine for Alaska honey to pull $12 for a 4oz jam-jar in a gift shop. I haven't closely priced anything else, up here, but I imagine a pint canning jar is going for pretty close to that $12 mark, but the jar is uglier and it's not in an already high-priced gift shop.
    The World Beehive Project - I build one of every popular beehive in the world!

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Dec 1999
    Location
    DuPage County, Illinois USA
    Posts
    9,647

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by BEES4U View Post
    If you make some profit spend it on your honey 1st and the bees 2nd!
    It's always a good idea to show appreciation to your spouse for putting up with all the time spent on beekeeping!

    - Barry

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Location
    Oxford, Kansas
    Posts
    1,988

    Default

    Your honey is worth only what the market will bare in your area. I would sugest going to some farmers markets, fairs, craft show's even the grocery store. Go anywhere local honey is sold in your area and see what they are charging. Chances are they will all be close with exception of the grocery store. Take a look at one of the bee mags they have average honey prices for every region in the USA. I get a little more than their average. I would start high its always easier to adjust your price down than it is to adjust up.

  9. #9

    Default wholesale prices

    What are beekeepers charging for there product sold to stores with your lable on it? I looked at the case price in the abj and that seems low???

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Location
    Macon, GA USA
    Posts
    953

    Default

    It is very low. But, I do give a decent discount to resellers because my time is precious and it saves a ton of time when they call you with orders and all you do is bottle and deliver. Taking the time to set up a stand and sit at a market all day is demands a high premium.

    I wouldn't pay much attention to the grocery store prices. The folks who are looking for local natural honey actually expect to pay more. Higher prices (within limits) actually elevate their perception of the quality. Cheap prices imply a lower quality product.

    It took me a long time to figure it out, but people who shop solely on price you probably don't want as customers.

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Location
    Jackson, MO
    Posts
    1,858

    Default

    I find the prices quoted in the magazines vary quite a bit, too much for me to use as these prices define my price, but they give you a range. You could start at the top of the range as a good quality product commands quality prices. You might visit a farmer's market to get an idea of what local honey commands. Be sure and cover your costs of production.

    I price my pints at $5 and quarts at $8.50

    I have one old boy who remembers producing honey for $1 a gallon back in the depression and $8.50 for a quart "is just too high." I offered to just give him a free quart, which he refused. So he pays me $5 for a quart as a consolation.

    People are funny.

    Grant
    Jackson, MO http://www.25hives.homestead.com
    Beekeeping With Twenty-five Hives: https://www.createspace.com/4152725

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Fuquay Varina, NC
    Posts
    261

    Default

    i did not have any problems selling 12oz bears for $5, pints for $8 and quarts for $13 in 2007 at a local farm stand. I also sold 6oz teaser size bears for $3. Initially the 6oz was the most popular size at the beginning of the year then by the end of the season the pints and 12oz bears were neck to neck. At our state farmers market the 1lb queenlines go for 8-$10 depending on type. Wildflower is usually at the low end while the Sourwood and Tupelo honey command higher prices.
    Hughes Honey Apiary
    http://www.hugheshoney.com

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Apr 2003
    Location
    Greenville, TX, USA
    Posts
    4,416

    Default

    Pints $8. Quarts $15. Local, raw, lightly filtered.

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Location
    Sawyer, Michigan, USA
    Posts
    2,115

    Default

    How do you know what to sell your honey for? That is a question that a lot my costumers have asked, I get the regional prices from American Bee Journal and Bee Culture. They will have a price range for your area. I once had a co-worker accuse me of price gouging when someone brought in a bottle of honey they bought from Wal-Mart. After I showed them what prevailing prices were for our region and he seen that I am actually on the lower end and let him know that the bulk honey he got from Wal-Mart might not even be real honey, he didnít think I was so over priced.
    I do sell my honey by weight, I sell it for $3.25 per pound.
    The Busy Bee teaches two lessons: One is not to be idle and the other is not to get stung.

  15. #15
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Location
    Oxford, Kansas
    Posts
    1,988

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Brent Bean View Post
    I do sell my honey by weight, I sell it for $3.25 per pound.
    at 3.25 a pound The guy was complaining. I dont see where you can make much money I get $5.00 a pound for mine

  16. #16
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    Lees Summit, MO
    Posts
    56

    Default

    1/4 pints $3.00, 1/2 pints $4.00, pints $6.00, Qrts $11.00. Cunk comb honey $1.00 more pints & quarts.
    Ric

  17. #17
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Location
    Sawyer, Michigan, USA
    Posts
    2,115

    Smile

    Riverrat:

    Your right I donít make a lot of money but I do make a profit, but then I really donít do it for the money.
    People will complain about anything, if you gave it away some would complain that you need to spread it on their toast for them.
    My main reason for beekeeping is the enjoyment of working with such a interesting creature, and the pollination I need for our blueberries. I started with two hives but soon found out that twenty five was a lot more fun.
    The Busy Bee teaches two lessons: One is not to be idle and the other is not to get stung.

  18. #18
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    Brasher Falls, NY, USA
    Posts
    28,271

    Default

    I'd love to get $3.25 per lb. I wholesale my 1 lb jars for $27.00 per case of 12, which comes out to $2.25 per jar. Minus the cost of the jar, the cap and the labels I'm getting maybe $1.75 for the honey itself.
    Mark Berninghausen
    The answers are the end. The questions are the journey. Journey on.



  19. #19
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Erin, NY /Florence SC
    Posts
    3,361

    Default

    A few can sell limited amounts of honey at high prices. In the long haul we found it best to keep in touch with what the local market dictates and always took the attitude we want the common man (people like us) to be able to afford to have our honey on their table. We sold nearly 18,000 lbs of great honey last year one jar at a time, face to face with every customer. That strategy has worked well for us for many years.

  20. #20
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Faulkner Manitoba, Canada
    Posts
    1,700

    Default

    We sell $2.50 a pound + the cost of the container and $3.00/lb for creamed. A couple of beekeepers around here sell for $2.00/lb, so when we started at $2.5 did we get flack. At farmers markets and sales some say cheap some say to pricy. They get it for a buck. Ask what flavor or flower and their reply is all honey is the same. I give them a sample taste, "no different than what i get". So I say "have a nice day" with a smile of course.

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
Ads